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  • Spindle Head stock repair

    This one found today on PM that I had to for other tools in past years that looks like it will cost and may take long time to fix. The fix is low cost and most of time will take less than week to have done.

    [Hone the bore and have the spinlde hard chrome and ground This type work in done ever day and auto shops in most towns. They do a great job and low cost.]


    ***
    I pulled the spindle out for inspection and this is what I found. Is there any way to repair this? Should I even try? Maybe just replace the head stock and spindle. I was hoping I could press in a brass sleve and turn down the spindle slightly. What do you Guys think. I am a big time rookie. ****


  • #2
    I cannot get your pic to be bigger so i cannot see the damage. But I have seen people weld onto a shaft and re-turn it,but im not too sure i would w a headstock spindle cause i dont know if itll cause any warping or not. I am new also,so theres gotta b a better way. Hopefully someone will chime in.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Gunsmithing View Post
      This one found today on PM that I had to for other tools in past years that looks like it will cost and may take long time to fix. The fix is low cost and most of time will take less than week to have done.

      [Hone the bore and have the spindle hard chrome and ground This type work in done ever day and auto shops in most towns. They do a great job and low cost.]

      This thread: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-toast-253601/
      in the SB fanatics forum.
      Your suggestion of chroming and grinding is a good one, a proper repair. Someone who just spent a pile of cash on an elderly SB is unlikely to spend more money on that type of repair work. The best answer given in the thread was: clean up the scoring, slap it back together and run it.

      Comment


      • #4
        This how crank shafts and cam shaft on done. clean scoring is a tem fix only. The other way is to grind the spindle and bore out the spinlde and use bronze bushing

        Dave

        Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
        This thread: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-toast-253601/
        in the SB fanatics forum.
        Your suggestion of chroming and grinding is a good one, a proper repair. Someone who just spent a pile of cash on an elderly SB is unlikely to spend more money on that type of repair work. The best answer given in the thread was: clean up the scoring, slap it back together and run it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gunsmithing View Post
          This how crank shafts and cam shaft on done. clean scoring is a tem fix only. The other way is to grind the spindle and bore out the spinlde and use bronze bushing

          Dave
          I don't disagree. It's a case of how good is good enough? It's a 40, 50, 60 year old lathe, clean it up, get it running and use it for a while. Get to know its limitations and issues. Then decide if the headstock spindle and bore are flawed to the point where the machine can't meet your needs.

          Comment


          • #6
            GS- good job cutting out all the context by not providing a link to the original thread.

            Quite simply, that is a model 405 spindle. Small bore, small (uncommon) threads, and a headstock with no tumbler reverse and non-segmented bearings. If the OP wants to spend some cash, he should do it to upgrade the headstock. But, if the burrs are removed, and the oiling is looked after, it will work just fine for years of hobbyist use. If there were any group of people that would argue for a fix, it would be the SB restorers over at PM. But they are not calling for it- that should tell you something.

            allan

            Comment


            • #7
              He is the link
              http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-toast-253601/
              It is sad most of the imports are not very good in comparison to lathe that are over 50 years old. For some money you have very good lathe.

              Dave


              Originally posted by kitno455 View Post
              GS- good job cutting out all the context by not providing a link to the original thread.

              Quite simply, that is a model 405 spindle. Small bore, small (uncommon) threads, and a headstock with no tumbler reverse and non-segmented bearings. If the OP wants to spend some cash, he should do it to upgrade the headstock. But, if the burrs are removed, and the oiling is looked after, it will work just fine for years of hobbyist use. If there were any group of people that would argue for a fix, it would be the SB restorers over at PM. But they are not calling for it- that should tell you something.

              allan

              Comment

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