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Endmill trims more via conventional cut

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  • Endmill trims more via conventional cut

    So I was minding my own business, cutting a slot in Aluminum the other day. It's one of those times where you slowly make the slot a little bigger a bit at a time until something fits in. I noticed, when passing the endmill back and forth over one edge of the slot, that it would tend to trim more if it was a conventional cut vs climb cut. Why is that? I thought that a climb cut has better geometry for the cutting edge to dig in instead of rub. This was with a carbide endmill, by the way.

  • #2
    Sounds to me like your gibs may be a little loose and the table is shifting in one direction more than in the other direction.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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    • #3
      If you were using a small diameter endmill it was most likely the endmill deflecting.Conventional milling defects the cutter in climb milling defects it out.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        cutting aluminum i always cut with faster spindle and climb for each pass . non climbing leaves a bad finish , chip marks and tends to clog up .

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        • #5
          I think with climb cutting, the tendency is to be "pushing" the stock away from the cutter ( 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock position) while conventional cutting "pulls" the work towards the cutter (12 o'clock to 3 o'clock position.) So any dullness in the cutter, or deflection of the bit, or slop in the machine ways is exaggerated one way or the other.
          Gary


          Appearance is Everything...

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