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Chrome like paint for my Lathe Tray?

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  • Chrome like paint for my Lathe Tray?

    I'm in the process of renovating my lathe. The tray is welded to the lathe table so I couldn't apply chrome. The whole table was sand blasted and then I spray painted all but the tray. I used a Dupont industrial epoxy paint in a dark grey.

    My question is whether the 'metal' colored paints can be applied and protected from swarf, cutting oil, etc. I wouldn't object to other colors like bronze, copper, brass as long as the finish is 'metal' like.

    Any ideas?




    Rob

  • #2
    I think you'd be better off with a surface that helps hide imperfections, such as a hammertone finish. If you could find a super-shiny chrome-like paint, it's going to show EVERY little nick and scratch and it's just not worth the effort in the abusive environment of a chip pan.

    A friend of mine is restoring a surface grinder and he painted parts of the castings with this "modified alkyd enamel" spray, in silver. It looks amazing. I would use an etching primer forst for best adhesion and wear resistance.

    http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=29

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    • #3
      I'm with PixMan on this. Chrome would look awful when it gets an oil film on it and smears If you drop something on it it will crack and peel and can cut the devil out of you when you are cleaning the chip pan. It's like a razor!
      Use a paint that will hide imperfections and dings, protect against rust, stands up to oils and doesn't chip easily when struck by an object. I've had good luck with Rustoleum's Professional Series paints. Preparation is the key for whatever paint you choose though. Super clean surface, lightly abraded, good primer and good finish coat. As for color, I'd choose something that shows up dropped tools easily while hiding greasy smears. It can be difficult to fins small dropped parts in a dark chip pan full of chips.

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      • #4
        POR15 is a very tough paint and would probably stand up to the rigors of a chip tray coating better than any other paint.
        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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        • #5
          Take a look into powder coating. Lots of different finishes, metallic,candy apple,flip-flop,pearl,wrinkle,etc.
          It's a baked on finish, so it should be pretty durable. You can also get ceramic coating that almost looks like electro plating.

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          • #6
            http://www.masterseriescoatings.com/index/primer/

            The MasterCoat Silver is wonderful paint.
            Would be great for a chip pan.
            It is a cyanoacrylate based paint (superglue).
            It sticks, well, like superglue.
            Resistant to gas (use it inside my gas tanks), have a tractor that
            this has been in the tank for over 10 years.
            And it is shiny. Just keep it off your hands and out of your lungs.
            With a brush it levels out fine. It is humidity cure, so opening
            the can starts it to harden. Pour our a small bit and re-seal the
            can. Use wax paper so the lid won't stick on the can.
            An easier to apply paint, I really like Rustoliem Aluminum paint.
            I have done one lathe chip pan in it, and I really like the paint.
            Beware of Rustoliem hammertone paint. It is not linseed oil
            based. It is a laquer paint with a small bit of silicone emulsified
            into it, to make it fish eye on purpose. Thats how it gets the
            hammer finish. Good luck re-coating it with any other paint.

            Not chrome, but this is a pic of Rustoliem smoke grey.
            A brand new can, and it applied very well. I brush painted
            the bed between the ways (with a quality brush) and sprayed
            the rest with the compressor. Rustoliem is rather thick, and
            a pressure cup type of gun is the way to go to make it feed.



            That is Rustoliem Aluminum paint on the handles.

            --Doozer
            DZER

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            • #7
              Duplicolor makes a chrome paint that looks amazingly like true chrome plating. You probably want to clear coat it with an automotive urethane for max durability. http://www.duplicolor.com/products/automotiveMetallic/

              RWO

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              • #8
                I would not use a paint that "hides imperfection" because it would make it hard to see that small part you drop in the tray, like the screw to hold the insert you are changing in your tool holder.

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                • #9
                  Nice job on that lathe doozer.

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                  • #10
                    I used a chrome power coat for the silvery parts of my lathe, including the chip tray pan. It has taken a beating from parts falling and all sorts of no so nice hydrocarbons sitting on it and it still looks pretty good. You could easily take the top off and take it down and have it powder coated. Here is a pic of what the parts look like:


                    DSC03135.JPG by macona, on Flickr

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                    • #11
                      stainless steel sheet metal liner

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                      • #12
                        Doozer - I do like the Rustoliem Aluminum paint.


                        Originally posted by macona View Post
                        I used a chrome power coat for the silvery parts of my lathe, including the chip tray pan. It has taken a beating from parts falling and all sorts of no so nice hydrocarbons sitting on it and it still looks pretty good. You could easily take the top off and take it down and have it powder coated. Here is a pic of what the parts look like:
                        macona, of course it had to be a Monarch, where nothing looks bad. I do like the PC. but my top is welded on and I don't want that hassle. especially when I just got the drive in the lower cabinet.


                        now, a stainless steel liner. that's something I'll think about. thanks
                        Rob

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                        • #13
                          I use a standard bakers cookie sheet on top of the chip pan with a few oil drain holes drilled in it just in case. Most of the swarf gets caught in that making it simple to dump in the chip barrel. You can get them in aluminum or even stainless with a bit of searching. The commercial types can be fairly large if it's needed. Real lathes come with proper pull out swarf trays of course. Mine doesn't.

                          Pete

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                          • #14
                            I'm with Portland red: I WANT to see the swarf so I can clean, somewhat properly, Wayne.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by uncle pete View Post
                              I use a standard bakers cookie sheet on top of the chip pan with a few oil drain holes drilled in it just in case. Most of the swarf gets caught in that making it simple to dump in the chip barrel. You can get them in aluminum or even stainless with a bit of searching. The commercial types can be fairly large if it's needed. Real lathes come with proper pull out swarf trays of course. Mine doesn't.

                              Pete
                              I just measured some trays in our shop standard size here in OZ is 16" x 29" you can also get 18" wide with the same length, you can also get half trays here.
                              Will

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