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Clausing compound screw threads.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This is strange, most if not all of the lathes I've used had compounds that were "direct reading" or moved .001" for every .001" on the dial. A 10 TPI compound screw should result in .100" travel for every revolution, so I find it quite odd that it has a .200" graduated dial.

    I scanned the manual for the 5914 Clausing, but did not see any indication of what the travel should be of the compound. If you want to read it, it is available here: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/181/3407.pdf

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  • oxford
    replied
    Are there lathes that use this for the compound? I can see using it for the cross slide, but can't see where it would benefit on the compound. Can anyone with a 5900 series confirm what the dial should read vs the movement. Maybe originaly there was a 2 start screw in there.

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  • Chuck K
    replied
    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    The thread is right hand on the compound and left on the cross slide on this lathe. The rod I got is right hand. I have not used the lathe since I got it. I have it most of the way apart for cleaning and figured I would address some problems(or future problems). Oldtiffie, the screw that came out is a single start. I did not check backlash on the dial, but when I grabbed the tool post I could move it back and forth probably a 1/16". I was going to just make a nut using evans method for the stock screw, but I figued that it would be easier to make the tap and make the nut out of solid delrin.

    Something else on this. The screw is a 3/8-10. The compound dial takes .200" to make 1 revolution, wouldn't that mean it is only going to move in a half of thou for every 1 on the dial? Souldn't the compound be a 1 to 1? Maybe I am not thinking about this right.
    10 tpi moves the compound slide .100 per revolution....your dial is reading .200 which is the diameter reduction with each revolution....assuming your perpendicular to the work.

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  • luthor
    replied
    10 tpi single start will move the slide .100". Maybe the dial is wrong or you are reading it incorrectly.

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  • oxford
    replied
    I belive it is a single start screw. I marked 1 thread and made one rotation and ended up at the thread next to it. Could it be possible that these are not factory parts and someone did a poor job making the acme thread and made the nut to fit?

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    Something else on this. The screw is a 3/8-10. The compound dial takes .200" to make 1 revolution, wouldn't that mean it is only going to move in a half of thou for every 1 on the dial? Shouldn't the compound be a 1 to 1? Maybe I am not thinking about this right.
    could it be a two start like John suggested? that would look like 10tpi but advance like 5tpi or .200 per rev....or its the style of lathe where the dail indicates how much is taken off the diameter vs the infeed

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  • oxford
    replied
    There may have been some slop in the thrust but there is definitely slop in the screw, nut or both. I still think that most of it is in the nut.

    I would think that the compound would be a direct read dial. There is a Clausing 6300 at work which is very similar to the 5914 that uses a direct read dial, I don't see what the benefit would be to change it to a diameter read dial there.

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  • macona
    replied
    Are you sure the slop was in the screw and not the thrust assembly on the dial?

    There are two kinds of dials, direct reading and diameter reading. Direct reading dial tell you how far you are moving the slide in, diameter dials tell you how much you are taking off the diameter of the stock.

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  • oxford
    replied
    The thread is right hand on the compound and left on the cross slide on this lathe. The rod I got is right hand. I have not used the lathe since I got it. I have it most of the way apart for cleaning and figured I would address some problems(or future problems). Oldtiffie, the screw that came out is a single start. I did not check backlash on the dial, but when I grabbed the tool post I could move it back and forth probably a 1/16". I was going to just make a nut using evans method for the stock screw, but I figued that it would be easier to make the tap and make the nut out of solid delrin.

    Something else on this. The screw is a 3/8-10. The compound dial takes .200" to make 1 revolution, wouldn't that mean it is only going to move in a half of thou for every 1 on the dial? Souldn't the compound be a 1 to 1? Maybe I am not thinking about this right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    Is there a chance that the old screw is that worn evenly over the entire length and wore the nut to the point that the new rod won't thread in? Is it something with using the general rod vs a precision one?
    I would say impossible.

    This may seem too obvious, but you did buy a left hand screw, right? Everyone one I've touch uses a left hand screw so you get the motion of clockwise rotation moves the tool toward the work.

    end of day, wear here doesn't matter that much here...I'd be more concerned about the ways and what they're like if the screw is worn out

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  • macona
    replied
    I am kind of surprised that there was enough use of a compound to wear the screw. How much backlash was there?

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    The nut was wore on my compound slide on a clausing 5914. I figured the screw threads were probably wore a little but I could tell no difference from the center threads to the ones on the ends of the screw so I thought they weren't too bad. I decided would make a new nut and ordered a piece of acme rod to make a tap out of. I got a piece of general 3/8-10 acme rod. The rod will not screw into the old nut and the threads don't look like the screw. The new rod the threads are wider(pitch is the same) and don't look as deep.

    Is there a chance that the old screw is that worn evenly over the entire length and wore the nut to the point that the new rod won't thread in? Is it something with using the general rod vs a precision one?
    If the lathe is still usable and any back-lash in the screw is not causing a problem why not leave it as it is until of unless it really is a problem.

    A moderate amount of nut or screw wear should not be a problem.

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    If the Clausing is the same as the Colchester that it looks to be based on, model i mean then chances are they are two start threads.

    You might be better off making a delrin nut.

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...s-the-easy-way

    Leave a comment:


  • oxford
    started a topic Clausing compound screw threads.

    Clausing compound screw threads.

    The nut was wore on my compound slide on a clausing 5914. I figured the screw threads were probably wore a little but I could tell no difference from the center threads to the ones on the ends of the screw so I thought they weren't too bad. I decided would make a new nut and ordered a piece of acme rod to make a tap out of. I got a piece of general 3/8-10 acme rod. The rod will not screw into the old nut and the threads don't look like the screw. The new rod the threads are wider(pitch is the same) and don't look as deep.

    Is there a chance that the old screw is that worn evenly over the entire length and wore the nut to the point that the new rod won't thread in? Is it something with using the general rod vs a precision one?
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