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  • Stuck Woodruff key

    I removed the right table crank on the Bridgeport while attempting to remove the AS235 power feed unit for repair. The #7 Woodruff key is stuck in the slot. It appears to be glued down or maybe even soldered in. I have tried heating it with a propane torch to loosen it, but did nothing but discolor the shaft. Any idea what to do next will be extremely appreciated.

  • #2
    When I can, I will use a small punch to persuade the key to move. Gentile taps so as to not damage the shaft or key. Work the key back an forth or drive it around the seat until it can be grabed with pliers. I have used a pair of cutter plier to grab the key and pry a key out. The key will be gouged by the cutter and you chance damage to the shaft if not careful.
    Krutch


    Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by louigi View Post
      Any idea what to do next will be extremely appreciated.
      Set camera to Macro/{Flower} setting, mount on tripod, bring plenty
      of lighting to bear on subject and use built-in timer on camera to take
      photos from a few different vantage points. The manual focus feature
      may be necessary for best results on close shots

      Upload to file sharing service: Posting pictures with photobucket

      Post links to images here.

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      • #4
        Likey rusted in good. Was there a good reason you needed to remove it?
        Usally, they are much better rusted in place then falling out mid assembley, somewhere in your shop.
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          When I can, I will use a small punch to persuade the key to move. Gentile taps so as to not damage the shaft or key
          pretty much that, start on the end away from where you have the best access, drive that end down, what IMO you are after is to have the end of the key where you can get at it "rock up" in the key seat...that higher exposed corner may allow you to grab it...I have, with limited success, taken a chisel and with a good, well place rap, with as much "up" angle as possible, on that exposed corner, knocked the key out...problem is you will likely only get one shot at that, unless it is hardened, the key will either move more, get pushed out completely, or you will shear off that exposed corner...if it is the latter, not good as that corner will now also, likely, have mushroomed somewhat which may seat the key even more (what is left of it)...its the keyseat and the shaft you have to save...with shaft being priority, you can cut another keyseat but...

          For what its worth, try cold instead of heat...before trying the above

          Edit to add: I have drilled holes partially through to weaken the key...there is a "pucker factor" there...but if its gotta go, its gotta go [noob hack so YMMV]
          Last edited by RussZHC; 10-25-2012, 05:21 PM. Reason: to add after OP reply

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          • #6
            Krutch,
            I've tried that, short of using a pneumatic hammer. I've pushed, pulled, tapped, hammered, heated, repeated and nothing dislodges it. I'm thinking of making a miniture slide hammer and pulling it.

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            • #7
              Black_Moons,
              I'm removing the AS235 power unit to replace the speed setting pot. The shim washers will not pass the key.

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              • #8
                Is there really a reason to remove that key now?

                As the OP can see and get to the "Woodruff" "half-round"" key it seems to mean that the power unit had been removed so it should go back on easily - unless he mangles the key - and still can't get it out.

                If it were me and I wanted to use the power unit on the mill I'd probably just put the power unit back on and use it.

                Think about the key later when you have enough time.

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                • #9
                  RussZHC,
                  The key is not hardened. If I can't budge it and can't pull it with a 'to be built' slide hammer, I will file it off, make needed repairs to the drive unit, remove the whole thing and cut a new key on a different spot using the lathe. About 15 hours, I expect.

                  How cold should it make the shaft? Frozen CO2? Liquid nitrogen?
                  Last edited by louigi; 10-25-2012, 05:43 PM. Reason: Additional response to RussZHC

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                  • #10
                    Drill through from the other side and use a drift. Don't drill too deep !
                    Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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                    • #11
                      You could carve it out with a Dremel and a cutting disc:

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                      • #12


                        The proper tool for the job.

                        --Doozer
                        DZER

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                        • #13
                          rkepler: I like that idea...funny how sometimes another better choice (than drilling, IMO) can't be seen

                          "Cold", not sure on that either...my simple thought is to just sometimes do the opposite, if heat did not work maybe cold will (e.g. if say it was glued in, and heat had little effect it maybe susceptible to cold), I was thinking more regular ice surrounding the area, if two different types of metal...plus it costs next to nothing to try...like you said, file away top, remove parts and make another seat could be "it"

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                          • #14
                            Get a good sized pair of these and grip the key at one end parallel to the shaft and, with a prying motion, lift it up and out of the slot.
                            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                              Get a good sized pair of these ... and grip the key at one end parallel to the shaft and, with a prying motion, lift it up and out of the slot.
                              That's what I do. The nippers in an earlier post work well, too.

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