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Stripping and rebuilding my 7x12

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  • Stripping and rebuilding my 7x12

    Well, I'll take my medicine. I'm less than kind to my tools.

    I noticed the other day while noodling with the radius tool for the first time (one of these, which to be honest I really don't like the feel of. But that may be my fault) that my lathe really sounded like it was straining.

    Plus, there was some rattle in the gearing that didn't make me happy.

    I figured the right thing to do would be to finally give it a good solid teardown.

    Having decided that, I went and made chili while I thought about it.

    Now I have precisely zero faith that I'll end up with the same number of parts I started with, to say nothing of knowing where they go.

    Any ideas about minimizing the chaos? (Consider this an open invitation for tips about anything I should be aware of or take care of while I'm up to my elbows in lathe guts as well.)

    I thought about setting up a laptop with a web cam over the top. I'm not sure if that would help or just be stupid.
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

  • #2
    Hi

    Here is a link that could be of some help...

    http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/projec...ges/index.html


    bert

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    • #3
      I just take a few pictures when needed & put all the parts removed in order & keep them all the same side up.
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mygrizzly1022 View Post
        Hi

        Here is a link that could be of some help...

        http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/projec...ges/index.html


        bert
        Hey nice, thanks o/

        Going through that it seems that there's far less to it than I feared. So it looks like I should be good with my little digital point & shoot and a few well labeled parts bins.

        Thanks
        ----
        Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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        • #5
          Just don't do what I did on another machine, tear it all apart and then take more than a year getting it back together again. That's a sure way to end up with extra or missing parts. Take pictures as you disassemble, lay the parts out as if in an exploded view drawing, clean/fix it, and get it back together before you forget how.

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          • #6
            +1 on taking pics . I always take alotta picks from different angles and when i finish reassembly i just delete unwanted ones.

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            • #7
              Machines are easy, try owning a motor cycle for 42 years with lots of parts removed, then selling it and put it all back together and only missing 1 part that I had an other of there is 2 on the bike, took 3 hours too reinstall all the parts. And no pictures just a 70 year old memory.

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              • #8
                Have some zip ties, short lengths of wire, or bread ties handy. Remove parts and slide them on to keep in order. I use lots of ziploc bags and write on the outside of the bag what the part group is. Bakers pans are handy for cleaning, dis-assembly, and grouping of parts. You can stack quite a few ziploc bags full of parts into a quarter sheet pan to stick on a shelf for later re-assembly.

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                • #9
                  I'm interested in what things a tear-down of a 7x lathe has revealed- things that are a make or break, or where a considerable or useful improvement can be made. I've read that the spindle bearings are no more than a regular deep groove ball bearing and have been replaced by some with tapered roller bearings-

                  Are there some major faults with these lathes? A friend is wanting a small lathe, but I don't want to steer him into a piece of junk. I probably couldn't use one myself, as that would be downsizing and I already have a Unimat. I have already steered him up from the Unimat and Taig sizes, and the 7x seems a good place to start.

                  Anyway, I don't want to hijack- just interested to know what anyone finds that needs work or changed for a better part, etc, when doing a tear-down.

                  I'm sure there's a forum for 7x owners- I can look for that.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    Those 7X seig lathes, in whatever label, are the most ubiquitous, documented, discussed, modified machine tools on the planet.
                    They are a hobby of their own. You can waste weeks just reading the information online

                    I have had 3 or 4, currently have a nice one that I rarely use, but it's so *cute*!

                    Tell him to get one. They are fun, and useful.

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                    • #11
                      I have a 7x14.

                      I bought it after doing a lot of lurking on this site and a few others --- all seemed to end up saying that one should just accept the fact that if one gets one of these lathes, one will have to tear it down and reassemble it to clean it of red-goop, adjust and tune it, make modifications, etc, etc. It's just a fact of life. So when I got it, I didn't even bring it down into the basement, I just broke it down into major chunks in the back of my pickup and carried each one down separately. I put it back together in the basement. Then, taking one major assembly at a time I cleaned everything, lubed things, removed burrs, and most importantly fiddled and faddled with each part and assembly. The goal was to get the machine in fair-ish working order and to learn how it was put together.

                      To do this, I just had this one project going on on my bench. I worked on one subassembly at a time. As I took things apart, I put the pieces into small bins, tubs, containers, etc. Keeping things moderately well segregated like this seemed adequate. I didn't label the parts. I was a bit worried at first about all the pieces parts for the leadscrew gearing --- then I realized that that subsystem was meant to be taken apart and reassembled in order to change the gearing, so that would probably actually be the least risky area to rebuild (and the instruction manual would most likely be the most helpful for that area).

                      Some other tips; work slowly and carefully --- don't just remove every screw and nut and bolt you see and then try and figure it out. Take some time to think ahead about what the next step is, etc, etc.

                      It all went much easier than I was afraid it might. I had no spare parts left over.

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