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  • What are these things for?

    These were part of the stuff givent to me recently. I thought they might be radius or fillet gauges, but they don't measure up to match with the markings. The back of the big one is stamped 'minimum limits':



    And why would a machinist, specifically a die-maker have globs of titanium so marked in his toolbox?



    Last question: What might these be? They're about .250" on the small end, precision ground. The second image shows how the cut is tapered. They appear to be from different manufacturers, as one has center holes in the ends and the other doesn't. The small ends are rounded and polished much like a telescoping gauge.



    Thanks,
    Gordon
    Last edited by chipmaker4130; 11-10-2012, 10:18 PM.

  • #2
    The half round gauges at the top pic, are they gauges for woodruff keys?

    The appear to have a depth mark on them?

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    • #3
      Sasquatch, that might be it! They do have depth marks, but I've always heard of woodruff keys being listed by number. Do the numbers correspond directly with fractional sizes like stamped in the gauges? Also the word 'rope' on each one is something I don't get.

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      • #4
        Roebling rope - as in steel cable

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_A._Roebling

        my guess is to pick the right clamp or fixture to match a dia of cable
        .

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        • #5
          Thanks, Mcgyver. I wondered about that, but these would be pretty big cables! The name seems to fit though.

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          • #6
            googling shows similair gauges going to up to a couple of inches
            .

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            • #7
              Maybe they're used to measure the grooves in a sheave to see which size wire rope it's made for.
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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              • #8
                Mcguyver beat me to it. I was going to guess they were for checking the grooves in pulley sheaves.

                Winchman too.
                Jim

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                • #9
                  Well now the pulley thing seems to make perfect sense along with the 'minimum limit' stamp. that would keep the groove from damaging the cable. I suppose it would also be valid for other types of rope too? You guys are amazing!
                  Last edited by chipmaker4130; 11-10-2012, 10:40 PM.

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                  • #10
                    The lump of titanium is probably an example of "neat to have." No other purpose than a conversation piece. I have a lump of tungsten that I have had for years. Since it has an SG close to that of gold, it surprises anyone who picks it up. It also got some atention one time when I asked someone to cut it with a torch.
                    When the owner of the tool box got that sample, titanium was probably like rocking horse sh!t-not too common!
                    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                    • #11
                      Duffy, that seems likely. Thing is, he had TWO lumps so I thought maybe they were somehow useful in his trade.

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                      • #12
                        Those two 0.25" rods might be the guide rods from a tool that is used to cut a bolt head recess. We have similar looking things at work that can be changed in the holder along with the cutters (basically end cutting 4 flute drills that have a hole through them to insert those guide rods). The slanted cut is so that when a screw is tightened against it, it pulls it against the bore end in the tool.
                        Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                        • #13
                          Don't know what the gauges are but Woodruff key gauges is an intriguing idea and sounds perfectly logical. The titanium ... ??? ... *shrugs*. The rods may be core pins for a plastic mold - the discoloration at the end suggests .. heat ? ... possibly?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
                            Last question: What might these be? They're about .250" on the small end, precision ground. The second image shows how the cut is tapered. They appear to be from different manufacturers, as one has center holes in the ends and the other doesn't. The small ends are rounded and polished much like a telescoping gauge.
                            Were it not for the centre holes, I'd be inclined to think those are captive tips for firearm firing pins...

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
                              And why would a machinist, specifically a die-maker have globs of titanium so marked in his toolbox?
                              You know whats funny about that, that atomic mass is about 0.5% off from "standard". For machinists used to much tighter standards, that is odd. To the best of my memory Ti is not like Pb in that its pretty much universal atomic mass around the world. I double checked on wikipedia and all the upper-40s Ti isotopes are stable, and there's practically no long life unstable isotopes, so the mass will be long term constant and its not going to be radioactive but there is either something odd about the measurement or odd about the sample.

                              Did the machinist work in the physics / nuke physics industry? Isotopically enriched Ti, that's weird. A little off topic (well, OK, a lot) but if space aliens left stuff in area 51 it would be "weird". Like 100 years ago if you told an engineer the electronics business would be almost totally based on purifying silicon and then intentionally adding contaminants, they'd think that's really weird. Kind of like isotopically enriched Ti is really weird. So if the machinist held a security clearance its either top secret air force research stuff or area 51 UFO stuff.

                              Another way of looking at it, assuming its impure Ti, is if you knew roughly what the contaminants are, you could guess the purity of the metal. Although then your average chemist is going to stamp it with the actual purity not the approximate atomic mass of the lump. Also I took some analytical chem (admittedly a long time ago) and 0.5% off isn't any more acceptable to a chemist than it is to a machinist.

                              What a weirdly interesting artifact. You could probably have some fun by giving it to a materials sciences/pchem professor at the local engineering school and asking them what they make of it. Someone with access to a mass spectrometer and/or a neutron activation setup.

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