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Electric Knife Sharpener

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  • danlb
    replied
    Toolguy, does the wheel at the top of the sharpener get hot on yours? Mine is much hotter than expected after only 15 minutes use.

    Dan

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  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    On that kts sharpener does the belt reverse directions for each side of the blade?
    Even though the belt does not reverse, you can get that effect by doing the left side of the blade and right side using the same slot. This requires that you insert the blade from one side of the belt and then the other.

    Dan

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  • Gazz
    replied
    If you want to get something for your wife, why don't you just sharpen the knives for her? Less expensive and you know they will be sharp. I used to work as a meat cutter and the chain I worked for decided that electric powered knife sharpeners would save them money. I hated them as they put really coarse edges on the knives so I continued to use the oil bath tri stones. It hurt my "career" as a meat cutter as I was penalized by management for taking so long to sharpen my knives and then for taking the time to round up my knives periodically since all the other cutters would steal them.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    I have one of those. It works pretty good. The belt does not reverse. It goes clockwise. For the final few passes I do the right side first with the belt going down toward the cutting edge and finish up on the left side with the belt going up toward the cutting edge. This removes any feather edge that might be left from the belt going down.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    On that kts sharpener does the belt reverse directions for each side of the blade?

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    This thread got me looking into the "Work Sharp" KTS (Knife and Tool Sharpener). What the thread does not say is that it's a miniature 3 wheel belt sander. The belts are 1/2 inch wide. I have a 1 inch and a 4 inch belt sander, so this sounded like a great addition to my garage.

    I put it on my wish list for Christmas and found one under the Christmas tree.

    I need to use a sharpener because I can not hold an angle when sharpening by hand. I usually use a Chef's Choice sharpening system for my knives. It puts a 3 level grind on the edge. It works quite well for a long lasting edge on a normal knife. I have some odd knives that don't sharpen well with this system, including the little Leatherman pocket knives that have a blade that is ground on one side like a scalpel.

    SO far I've only used the 6000 grit belt to hone the edge. The KTS does put a nice sharp ROUNDED edge on the knife. The guide sets the major angle but the give in the belt lets follow the curve of the side of the blade by just the slightest amount. The end result is the reverse of a hollow ground sharpening. The edge is very sharp but it's backed up by thicker material.

    I've rejuvenated many of the knives my wife likes. Some are cheap paring knives made by Sabatier. The blade profile was stamped and then ground on one side only to establish the edge. She likes them, so we use them. The birds beak knives are quite handy but hard to sharpen on my other sharpeners. The KTS worked quite nicely. Even my good knives cleaned up nicely.

    I'll be using it in the shop next. I want to try it to hone the HSS tools that I use when parting. I think a jig/rest to support the tool at the right angles will do the job.

    Dan

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  • danlb
    replied
    My wife is a techie type person, so I can't provide a point of reference. Even so, she leaves it to me to sharpen the kitchen knives. Her paring knives are off limits. She does that thing where she cuts vegetables against her thumb, so I only sharpen those when requested.

    That's with the Chef's Choice, BTW.

    Dan

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  • Mike Hunter
    replied
    All,

    Thanks very much for the time & input, very much appreciated.
    Guess I need to clarify the situation/requirements a little.
    Wife has a very nice mixture of Henckel and Wustohf kitchen knives, which generally I would not mind sharpening. BUT…. My wonderful wife does have a bad habit of cutting on ceramic plates; marble counter tops, glass surfaces, which as we all know will dull a knife quickly. …And yes she has several wood/Plastic cutting boards to choose from.
    So with that in mind, here are my requirements:
    1. Must do a decent job of sharpening.
    2. Must be easily operated by a lady who’s tool kit consists of a hammer and a screwdriver.
    3. Must look “Nice’ in the kitchen; otherwise it will be banished to the shop, where I will be sharpening the knives again.
    4. Must be able to produce decent results when operated by a person who has a working knowledge of a screwdriver and hammer.

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  • elf
    replied
    Although many people recommend Chefs Choice, including Cooks Illustrated, I found the design is very poor. It doesn't do a good job of constraining the knife to the desired angle. I could get a better edge on a knife by using it with the power turned off.

    I built a jig from workshop scraps based roughly on the Lansky system that works really well: http://lansky.com/index.php/products/universal-system/ There are tons of cheap knockoffs on ebay that would probably work as well. Once a knife is sharp, it's trivial to keep it sharp by hand.

    p.s. A colleague at work calls the Work Sharp system the "Tool Wrecker".

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I got one of these about a year ago on sale. It is great for knives and the wheel speed is slow enough that injury is not a major concern. It does have a water bath.

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921174000P

    It can leave a wire edge, but I always finish up with very fine sandpaper (600 grit or finer) or a fine stone with a few light strokes into the edge. I follow that with a stroke or two square into a 2x4 to remove anything that the sandpaper or stone may have left.

    It did such a good job of sharpening the kitchen knives that I had to leave a warning note in the drawer. One nice thing is the slow speed prevents removing too much metal from the knife edge. I plan to test it on tools like lathe tools and drills sometime soon.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-16-2012, 12:10 AM.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Another vote for the Chef's Choice machines, especially for someone like the wife who can't be bothered to go out to the shop and deal with it like a man.

    Like Michigan Doug I too subscribe to the 1" belt sander method and get great results with it.

    Here's a link to a quick, (well okay 10 min.) video explaining the procedure. I doesn't take a lot of practice to achieve razor sharp results once you have the correct belts and follow the sequence.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eREokC4MPM0

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  • spongerich
    replied
    We've had the Chef's Choice in our kitchen for many years and it works great. Even dull knives can be revived with it.
    If you use it regularly, it takes only about 30 seconds to put a razor sharp edge on.

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  • michigan doug
    replied
    If they need a lot of work, I go to the 1" belt sander. For touch ups, and after the rough work on the belt sander, I also use ceramic sharpening sticks. I also threw away the original cedar base, and made my own hardwood block, with a multitude of angles. Ten minutes worth of work on the drill press. Axes want something different than pocket knives, which want something different from razor blades.

    doug

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  • Krunch
    replied
    This won't make a dull knife sharp (or at least not fast) but it'll keep a sharp knife sharp forever:

    http://www.knivesplus.com/lanskyknif...lk-lcsgm2.html

    With both 20° and 25° sharpening bevels, it's the best knife sharpening system I've tried (and I've tried several)!

    Be sure to get a second set of ceramic sticks, so that you have both medium and fine grits, and you'll be good to go.

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  • macona
    replied
    My dad recently bought one of these and swears by it:

    http://store.aihalaska.com/index.php...ducts_id=32680

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