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My Shop is a Pole Barn, Need Suggestions for Interior

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  • My Shop is a Pole Barn, Need Suggestions for Interior

    My shop is actually a pole building, wood posts, 2 x 6 stringers with corrugated metal on the exterior, normal pole barn stuff. The roof is a bit unusual in that I had some salvaged metal trusses that were given to me. They were set on top of the poles, and then I bolted 2 x 8's flat on the top of them, and run 2 x 6's upright across the top of them, then used the corrugated metal to cover the top of them. The ends are wood framed, with 3 trusses in the center of the building 12' apart. It makes for a nice 30 x 48' building.

    When built I needed a quick building, so there is no insulation as of yet. I am now wanting to finish the inside and wondering the best way to go about it. What I would like to do is to use the corrugated metal on the inside of the building as well, with insulation between the two sheets of metal. Just wondering if anyone else has tried this?

    I have seen a couple of (commercial) garages that used the white metal on the interior of the building, roof included. It would be a bit more expensive than OSB, but by the time you seal and paint, probably would not be that much more when labor is considered.

    When conditions are right and the metal is cold from the outside, I will have it "rain" on the inside of the building. I would hope that the inner layer of metal being insulated from the outer layer would reduce this (having a heated building would help,too). There is a vent at the peak that runs along the length of the building; I am hoping that lowering the ceiling on the interior to keep the bottom of the vent above the top of the insulation, along with the ridges from the corrugated exterior walls, would allow ventilation between the inner and outer walls.

    Haven't been able to find much info on this stuff yet, just wondered what others would think of this or if anyone else has done it? Thanks!

  • #2
    You don't say how tall the building is. If it were me, I would stand sheets of plywood upright(eight feet tall) on the lower part of the wall, then tin up higher.
    That way you have lots of nailing surface for shelves or hanging stuff.
    My Quonset hut had similar issues. It only stood ten feet tall so I built five foot high stub walls with railroad ties on four foot centers.
    Worked perfect. It got the building tall enough to be usable and I made shelves between the r.r. ties from two by eights.
    Both walls are solid shelves fifty feet long.
    I insulated the roof and added an inner layer of corrugated tin. Had to cover the Styrofoam insulation,to keep the birds from pecking the stuff.
    Threw a swamp cooler on top and it stays 70-80 degrees inside while 110 outside. The back half is two story and the upstairs does get too warm on hot days.

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    • #3
      Commercial metal buildings are insulated (typically) with wide vinyl faced insulation. 0.0032 vinyl is the cheapest and is a PITA to work with - it tears easily. WMP-VR is a kraft backed reinforced vinyl faced insulation facing and is a pretty good product. You can usually order Metal Building Insulation in any width up to about 5' or 6' and whatever lengths you need and with whatever tabs you need (The facing is typically wider than the actual itch to allow taping or stapling joints.) Lamtec is probably the biggest facing manufacturer (http://www.lamtec.com/lamtec_product_wmpvr.html) They have many types of facing with a wide range of costs.


      Typically the stuff is secured at the base, pulled up tight and secured at the eaves - then the wall sheets are installed - trapping the insulation is place. The roof is similar, the insulation is laid out, then roofed over. Since you are essentially retrofitting you''ll need some other way to secure the insulation. Most of the suppliers for Metal Building Insulation will have some sort of adhesive backed stick pin with a metal washer that you can use. Dynamic Fasteners catalog shows them on pg 61 (http://www.dynamicfastener.com/handg...fIRST_HALF.pdf) I'm not a huge fan of adhesives (they seem to only stick when you don't want them to) but if you insulate, secure it well, and then go over it with liner panel/plywood or something it'll probably stay put.

      Interior metal liner panels are also readily available. Most any metal building co or panel supplier would have them. They usually are a little lighter gauge than the exterior panels and, if coated, they won't have exterior use warranties on the coatings.

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      • #4
        Any flooring in there yet? Lots of moisture comes up from the ground when there is no floor.
        gvasale

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        • #5
          If condensation is going to be a problem your going to need to run a good size dehumidifier.

          JL............

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          • #6
            I talked to a few insulation contractors last year at a local home show about how to insulate my steel truss/steel sided barn. They all told me to have the inside of the metal siding sprayed with foam insulation to prevent sweating, then insulate with either blown in or bats of insulation.

            Brian
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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            • #7
              x'2 for plywood for the first 8' and then spray foam for the rest.

              After the foam paint it stark white and you will need less lights.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                My shop is kind of half and half. It has normal walls but the ceiling has pole building spacing. I ran 2x4 stringers between the trusses so that normal sized insulation would fit in nicely.

                I have also seen the metal on the inside like you mentioned. But what I don't like about it is how hard it is to work with for putting in outlets, wall hangings, or any simple add ons/customization after the fact.

                After that I just drywalled over, no sealing, no paint, didn't see the need.

                I made a thread when I started the drywall here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...ack-no-problem
                Andy

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                  x'2 for plywood for the first 8' and then spray foam for the rest.

                  After the foam paint it stark white and you will need less lights.

                  One of the companies we work with had the spray foam done about 10-15 years ago. They had to tear down the entire ceiling of the3 shop to replace the wood from rot. They say no more spray foam for any of their buildings.
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vpt View Post
                    One of the companies we work with had the spray foam done about 10-15 years ago. They had to tear down the entire ceiling of the3 shop to replace the wood from rot. They say no more spray foam for any of their buildings.
                    They had water getting in somewhere I'd bet,screw holes are the most likely if a metal roof.If water is getting in all bets are off regardless of what isulation choice is made.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      Pole Dancers!
                      I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                        They had water getting in somewhere I'd bet,screw holes are the most likely if a metal roof.If water is getting in all bets are off regardless of what isulation choice is made.
                        It was from condensation building up from the inside of the building.
                        Andy

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by vpt View Post
                          It was from condensation building up from the inside of the building.
                          A potential problem with some closed cell spray foams is that if the operator doesn't set the mixture right and spray the foam right, after the initial expansion of the foam, it will then condense as it cools and solidifies and can pull away from whatever it was sprayed against. This leaves voids that become cold and then condensation can happen. I was watching for this when I had my attic done and the next day used cans of Great Stuff to fill in some gaps.

                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            You can keep some of the “rain” out by venting fan running no stop. This is not a good fix but it will help stop the rust monster from eating the machines as fast.

                            I have an old house heater with forced air in my barn. The hardest part of that was getting it up in the rafters. It is an oil burner feed by a 250 Gal tank. Delivery is once or twice a year and I run my tractor from it too. Running the heater this stops the rain and is enough to heat my barn in the winter to 70 deg without insulation.

                            Pole barns mean pole mice. Yes they are the pole dances. They love the foam for nesting. Once they get in to it, it is like a gerbil tube but you can’t see inside. All you know is there little pieces of foam and what looks like black rice. Hahaha

                            The other problem with foam is you still have hot and cold. You need an R value greater than 12 or you still have the rain but it will be above the foam. That is how the wood riots. This will also make mold.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the replies! Actually sort of long range planning as I don't have any concrete yet. My wall height will probably wind up something like 11'. I think my initial intention was to use drywall or maybe OSB, but I have to say I like the looks of the interior metal buildings that I have seen.

                              I have a section that is 12 x 30' where I put in a raised floor (wood joists) over a 6mil plastic vapor barrier. I separated this from the rest of the shop to do some assembly work for one of my customers. I am thinking (as I don't have the funds for concrete yet) that I may try and do some finish work in this section (and move my benchtop machinery in this section, and GET SOME HEAT)! My initial plan was to stud it 16" on centers and put in drywall- but on second thought, the studs don't really add anything structurally, so would be a waste of money. I could put up stringers and put metal over those, less wood in the long run.

                              My hope was that metal on the inside would prevent interior air from condensing on the interior of the outside metal. I didn't have the funds to insulate when I built the building, but am wishing now I had!

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