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Looking for Step-by-step machining projects - know of any?

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  • Looking for Step-by-step machining projects - know of any?

    I'm looking for a video, or illustrated text, that basically goes through building a simple project, or machining a simple piece.

    Here's the catch, I want to have a running commentary that explains what the machinist was thinking, why they did it that way, etc.

    I find that there is a lot on the subject of how to perform various processes: facing, turning to a shoulder, boring, etc.

    This is pretty easy stuff. What is harder is putting it all together, workarounds for missing tooling, shortcuts, the thought process essentially.

    Here's an example of what (I think) it would sound like:

    "Today we're going to make a 1" shaft for my belt sander. I could just buy pre-made shafting, but I find that what I can buy around here is always a few thousandths undersize. Since we're press-fitting this to a bearing, I can't really have that. We don't need super-accuracy though, so I'll use the three-jaw chuck. Now that the shaft is turned down, I'm going to swap tools on the QCTP for this little cutter I made up to do chamfering. I might as well do the chamfer right now, since I've got it all chucked up, and besides, a machined chamfer will look much nicer than if I do it with a file or something..."

    I've looked on Youtube, but the best I've found is "tubal cain" and his project making a pulley. Good, but not great, and that's only one.

    Anybody know of others?

    Katou

  • #2
    I find that the articles in "Home Shop Machinist" and their related magazines tend to do what you are describing. Very nicely done with illustrations, and explanations that you are talking about. Note: I have no pecuniary interest in the publications, just found them very useful!

    There are several websites that I have run across, you might try searching "9 x 20 lathe mods." Seems there are a couple of guys that have websites with some of their projects shown step by step as they were done, with such explanations.

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    • #3
      Look up KEF791 's youtube channel; he has a general repair shop and makes very good videos of the stuff he does; I learned a lot.

      Good luck, Peter

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      • #4
        member GadgetBuilder has several projects listed on his website. These are
        presented in a format similar to the one you mention. A small, yet useful one
        that comes to mind is A Four Facet Drill Sharpener.

        Frank Ford has many interesting projects on his website

        Village Press has numerous publications by several authors. The "Shop Wisdom" series
        in particular are titles to investigate.

        George H. Thomas provides several projects in his books. Available from TEE Publishers
        The Model Engineers Workshop Manual
        Workshop Techniques

        SmartFlix, the "How-To" DVD rental source has an extensive collection of videos.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by katou View Post
          I'm looking for a video, or illustrated text, that basically goes through building a simple project, or machining a simple piece.

          Here's the catch, I want to have a running commentary that explains what the machinist was thinking, why they did it that way, etc.

          I find that there is a lot on the subject of how to perform various processes: facing, turning to a shoulder, boring, etc.

          This is pretty easy stuff. What is harder is putting it all together, workarounds for missing tooling, shortcuts, the thought process essentially.

          generally thats what the magazine tries to do. When i started I read everything, whether I had any intention of building it or not...the value was in seeing how all kinds of different guys (mostly very experienced) came at things. Most articles are instruction in the complete project vs how to drill.
          .

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          • #6
            Fantastic fellows! I had hoped for resources such as these.

            I think I will bite the bullet and get a subscription as soon as my wallet recovers from my most recent purchase of a Gorton 9J vertical mill.

            In the meantime, I will definitely check out those web-resources. Should keep me busy for a bit.

            Again, thank you, spot on.

            Katou

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            • #7
              I've more or less finished building a Quorn T&C grinder. Chaddock's book, not to mention the original articles, are an in depth description of all his thinking on the details of his design and construction methods.

              I'm mentioning this because reading the book might be interesting to see the fellow's thought processes on the larger project.

              It's generally considered that everything stemmed from the era when a home builder was not expected to have a mill, and it's also often considered that the final product leaves a lot to be desired as far as modern home shop grinding requirements go.
              Richard

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              • #8
                another that is very good is Guy Lautard's Machininist Bedside Readers. Lots of info and an enjoyable writing style.
                .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by peter76 View Post
                  Look up KEF791 's youtube channel; he has a general repair shop and makes very good videos of the stuff he does; I learned a lot.

                  Good luck, Peter
                  http://www.youtube.com/user/KEF791

                  +1 on Keith. His is a one man repair/job shop and he has quite a few interesting videos on older techniques like pouring babbit and basic heat treating, all done while working on customer paying projects that came in the door. He's also got a blog on his regular website, not youtube.
                  "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                  • #10
                    Check out some of these project logs:

                    http://www.google.com/#hl=en&tbo=d&s...=1318&bih=1043
                    (select 'Full Version' at bottom of each thread chosen in order to see pictures)

                    http://www.homemodelenginemachinist....-n-ends-10575/

                    David Merrill

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                    • #11
                      Live Steam
                      Home Shop Machinist
                      Machinists Workshop
                      Model Engineer
                      Model Engineers Workshop
                      Australian Model Engineer (good one)
                      Engineering In Miniature
                      Modeltec (if you can find them)


                      All of these do exactly what you want. You may not be into model making but the techniques are the same for turning and milling other things that you might want to do.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                      • #12
                        If you're a glutton for a larger project, check out Kozo's books (from Village Press & on Amazon)

                        http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...=kozo+building

                        He has very nice and very detailed instructions on machining/building the parts/assemblies to make a locomotive (Shay/Heisler/Climax).

                        Even if you don't build one of his locomotives, the tips & tricks in there are very valuable to a amateur machinist (such as myself).

                        Mike

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                        • #13
                          Advanced Machine Work by Smith: http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Machi.../dp/0917914236

                          Any of the Workshop Practice Series books. Lathe, Mill, etc., all have chapters containing step by step detailed projects.
                          Last edited by Rosco-P; 11-20-2012, 06:16 PM.

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