Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

laptops on airplanes question.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • laptops on airplanes question.

    Next week I'm taking a nine hour commercial flite and thinking about taking my laptop on the plane as carry on baggage. I have Solidworks 2012 on the laptop and thought this might be a good time to work with some of the tutorials.

    1) Does Homeland security allow laptops and spare batterys as carry on baggage?

    2) Can a laptop be easily operated from an airplane seat? Is there a way to charge the laptop.

    3) Would I be better off with a book to read and forget the laptop on the plane?

    I know we will be on a large plane, 777 I think. The laptop will be nice to have when I reach our destination. Going to Pearl Harbor to pay my respects to my uncle killed on the USS Arizona.

    Thanks, Jim
    So much to learn, so little time

  • #2
    they are fine to carry on, smallish seats and lack of elbow room hamper things but its manageable. many planes have 110 outlets so you can charge in flight, check with the airline. I'd take a book or ipad as well.....that's too long a flight to do any one thing. Also bring decent earbuds, all air canada flights for example have screens in the headrest with a good selection of movies...again check with the airline
    .

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by outback View Post
      1) Does Homeland security allow laptops and spare batterys as carry on baggage?
      Yes to both.

      2) Can a laptop be easily operated from an airplane seat? Is there a way to charge the laptop.
      Yes and don't know, certainly not from your seat.

      3) Would I be better off with a book to read and forget the laptop on the plane?
      I'd bring both. 9 hours of software tutorial would likely fry your brain!

      Steve

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SteveF View Post
        certainly not from your seat.
        why would you say you are certain about it? just about every air canada flight has them so why wouldn't others possibly have it? Is there a law in the US about it or something?

        http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3639/...155c69cc90.jpg
        .

        Comment


        • #5
          If you are in economy, In theory, there is enough room to pull down the tray, put a laptop on it, and open the laptop and work on it.
          In practice.... Ymmv
          especially if the person in front of you reclines their seat

          As to tsa, usually they insist that laptops be removed from their bag and go through the scanner in their own tub, so pack accordingly.

          I've never seen 110vac on planes. But I've not been in every plane and every airline :-)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by fjk View Post
            I've never seen 110vac on planes. But I've not been in every plane and every airline :-)
            hmmmm....being in Canada, most domestic and international flights i take are Air Canada which always seem to have it. I've guess I've become used to it....and am surprised its such a rarity on US carriers
            .

            Comment


            • #7
              Learn something new every day. Apparently in-seat power ports / outlets are becoming much more common on the newer aircraft. Found this web site which may show if one might expect to find them on a given airline / aircraft.

              http://www.seatguru.com/

              Steve

              Comment


              • #8
                When I flew to Vegas in April the seats had 120vac outlets, as well as screens in the backs of the seats and internet connections for in flight. The internet is EXPENSIVE. I think the newer birds have the goodies.

                Brian
                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
                  I think the newer birds have the goodies.

                  Brian
                  As well as larger, and more long distant. No need to supply a lot of things if you're only going to be in the air 2 1/2 hours. 9 hours...now they have to look at keeping you fed and busy...so you don't bother them.
                  Definition: Racecar - a device that turns money into noise.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Business and first class have all of the amenities, steerage not so much.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Used to fly quite a lot for work. Always brought laptop.

                      Despite the fact that power outlets are found on most planes of recent vintage (on the headrest in front of you, or the one in front of the seat beside you), I find that not only do I get the person reclining their seat into my lap all the time, it's hard to concentrate.

                      I figured that last one when bringing along Feynman's "Six Easy Pieces" as reading material - what a mistake! Now, I bring along a Terry Pratchett novel or 3; one can re-read them because, on a plane, reading you'll miss 80% of anything first time through! So, I just grab a couple of random Terry Pratchett novels when packing. (no tablet usage, yet, for reading)

                      Bring noise cancelling headphones. I have a set that also plugs into a 3.2mm jack so I can watch a movie or program, or listen to the music, if I want. They make a HUGE difference.

                      Another JohnS.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SteveF View Post
                        Yes and don't know, certainly not from your seat.
                        Most airlines don't have power outlets in the sardine class. They're in business class.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by outback View Post
                          Next week I'm taking a nine hour commercial flite and thinking about taking my laptop on the plane as carry on baggage. I have Solidworks 2012 on the laptop and thought this might be a good time to work with some of the tutorials.

                          1) Does Homeland security allow laptops and spare batterys as carry on baggage?

                          2) Can a laptop be easily operated from an airplane seat? Is there a way to charge the laptop.

                          3) Would I be better off with a book to read and forget the laptop on the plane?

                          I know we will be on a large plane, 777 I think. The laptop will be nice to have when I reach our destination. Going to Pearl Harbor to pay my respects to my uncle killed on the USS Arizona.

                          Thanks, Jim
                          I've travelled extensively both domestically in Canada and internationally.
                          In general, laptops are allowed universally.
                          Operating themin flight may cause you some grief because homeland security is not he only regulating body to worry about. FAA rules insist that any electronic device be stowed and off during takeoff and landing. The same rules as well as airline policy insist that any wireless capability be disabled.

                          110 AC outlets may, or may not be available depending on airline and class of ticket. Business class and above will almost without exception have 110 AC available. Economy is a crap shoot. Check with a travel agent or airline booking agent whether AC will be available.

                          Security checks will include removing your laptop from its bag and running it through the scanner by itself. Ususally, I can make it through security with two tubs - one for the laptop and the other for all the other stuff. Occaisionally, I've had to open the laptop and have it start for security, but that was a long time ago. I've only had to remove it for scanning in the last few years.
                          Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Do yourself a huge favor and package all your peripherals and gadgets in a couple of clear ziplocks. Put all the ziplocks in a one gallon ziplock. Ziplock in one tub, laptop in another. Easy-peasy and no requests to unpack your bag while everyone waits because something looks "dangerous".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A note about earphones.

                              There are several ways to get relief from the constant drone of the flight. Some folks bring an iPod or other mp3 player. Others bring ear plugs, ear muffs or noise canceling ear muffs/phones.

                              With typical ear buds from apple you still hear all the outside noise, so you have to turn the volume way up. By the end of the flight your ears have taken a battering. But at least you can hear the pilot's announcements.

                              Noise canceling earphones are great, but they work by by injecting a sound wave that cancels out the drone, then overlay the sounds you want to hear on top of that. The end result (for people like me) is the feeling of a constant pressure on th ear, about like being 6 feet underwater. Again, most are set up so that you can hear voices so the stewardess will not have to tap you on the shoulder.

                              Another class of ear buds are "sound isolating". They conform to the shape of the ear canal and physically block outside sounds. They allow you to turn the music down to a reasonable level and still hear it. You might have to momentarily remove them when the cabin pressure changes, but they work really well. You probably don't mind a stewardess bending over to get your attention anyway. They are my choice. Oh, they fit in your pocket too.

                              Sound isolating earbuds are available for under $50. Or for less than a buck; http://lifehacker.com/5347245/make-c...-than-a-dollar


                              Dan
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X