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My first spur gear

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  • My first spur gear

    The gears in my inline air sander finally wore out. I found one replacement but the second gear was worn as well so I decided to attempt to make one. Here are a few pics of my attempt. The result was just ok but I think it will work fine.





  • #2
    Here is a pic of cutting the teeth and one of the finished product. It took three passes with different grindings of a tool steel to get the full tooth shape.

    The gear on the right is the one I made. The one on the left is one of the old worn ones.
    Last edited by herbet999; 11-22-2012, 01:09 AM.

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    • #3
      Wow, very nice!
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

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      • #4
        How did you index each tooth? Were you using the old gear?

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        • #5
          Re: The one on the left is the old worn one:

          For heavens sake,, we COULD tell the difference!! LOL!!

          Nice workmanship!!

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          • #6
            nice job, always great seeing basic equipment used for more advanced jobs like gear making
            .

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            • #7
              Very nice, somewhat above a "just OK" result I think. Give yourself a bit of credit.

              Like Mcgyver, I too like seeing stuff like this done using these sorts of techniques. Basic shop tools, simple indexing system using the original part, and you even ground your own cutters. I have always found the making of tools and cutters fascinating. Cool when you can make a tool that allows you to accomplish what looks to most like an "impossible" job.

              Thanks for sharing your work here!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                How did you index each tooth? Were you using the old gear?
                Yes, I used the old gear. I was able to position the new gear blank and the old gear together using the pin that the gear rides on in the air sander. I basically indexed it by hand and eye.
                Last edited by herbet999; 11-22-2012, 11:34 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by alanganes View Post
                  Very nice, somewhat above a "just OK" result I think. Give yourself a bit of credit.

                  Like Mcgyver, I too like seeing stuff like this done using these sorts of techniques. Basic shop tools, simple indexing system using the original part, and you even ground your own cutters. I have always found the making of tools and cutters fascinating. Cool when you can make a tool that allows you to accomplish what looks to most like an "impossible" job.

                  Thanks for sharing your work here!
                  Yes, it's the challenge that appeals to me. I had to make several passes with 3 different cutters because I only have a basic shop grinder so it's hard to get much accuracy with the shape of the cutters. The first pass was just to cut out most of the material then the second pass cut the base and the third pass to shape the teeth.

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                  • #10
                    Really nice, never thought about lathe cutting that direction for a gear.

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                    • #11
                      Most likely good enough for whatever it is used for. You deserve credit for that. I don't think one should call it a "gear". "Roller with grooves" would be more accurate. No offense intended.

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                      • #12
                        It's always good to see someone solve a problem with the tools they actually have - Great work!
                        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                        • #13
                          " I don't think one should call it a "gear". "Roller with grooves" would be more accurate. No offense intended."

                          I think you're a jerk. No offense intended.

                          I see what looks like something approximating an involute tooth form. Not a roller with grooves.

                          doug

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                          • #14
                            A truly clever set-up. I would have never thought of it. The gear looks pretty good to me.

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                            • #15
                              Great Job!! Thinking out of the box is what one has to do to get along. I don't think I have ever seen a gear cut that way before. Love it.
                              Mel
                              _____________________________________________

                              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                              Oregon Coast

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