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SB 405 "Workshop" T/S..... is the nut/bearing RH or LH?

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  • SB 405 "Workshop" T/S..... is the nut/bearing RH or LH?

    The nut being the large one that holds the ram screw and handwheel.

    I am cleaning up the machine to sell, and want to clean the old swarf and goo out of the ram bore, without the screw interfering.

    However, it is masquerading as a "no-handed" nut right now. Stuck tight and not responding to PBlaster.

    BTW, per Forrest Addy's advice on cleaning, I cleaned the whole machine plus the benchtop with about a half cup of mineral spirits, a scraper, and a rag. That was because it was a rare warm day, sun was setting, and I wanted to avoid time waste going for more solvent.

    Machine is a relative's, and they get offers of about $100 "to get rid of it for him" around his area (somewhat more here), so I carried it back in the truck.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    The handwheel is more than likely keyed to the shaft as that is standard practice. There is no need for it to be left hand thread. Do you have a nut splitter?
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      The hand wheel is pinned to the screw with a tapered pin. Drive pin out, pull off the wheel, ram and screw will pull out.
      Last edited by topct; 11-29-2012, 11:45 AM.
      Gene

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      • #4
        Nut splitter

        I restored a 405 a few years ago and I am pretty darn sure that the nut that holds the handwheel in the tailstock casting is right handed. I used a BF cresent wrench to remove it. The acme screw that drives the tailstock ram is left-handed, of course. As stated above the handwheel is pinned to the screw shaft. My bushing was in good enough shape and I saw no reason to remove the hand wheel from the shaft. If I recall, you can crank the handwheel clockwise until the ram screws off the end of the acme screw and pull it out of the casting.

        Tom
        Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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        • #5
          I, perhaps erroniously, assumed from your question that you were indeed referring to a nut, not a fitting screwed into the tailstock that retains the handwheel/leadscrew assembly.

          Looking at Tony's site, it appears in some of the pictures as a hex assembly, probably with a male thread. I still see no reason for it to be anything but a R/H thread, though I would hardly call it a nut.

          http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbendmodelfive9inch/
          Jim H.

          Comment


          • #6
            It looks precisely like a nut to me...... a hex nut of around 1.5" size.

            Agree it need not be LH, but from it's usage, it could have been. Info elsewhere also suggests it is RH, but it still ain't budging.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Comment


            • #7
              If you've judiciously applied heat to the nut and it still hasn't moved, there's always the brute force method...get a bigger wrench/longer snipe!
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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              • #8
                If/as its a hex head/nut why not try an impact wrench aka a "rattle gun".

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would have called it an end cap or some such rather than a nut. The later variations ditched the hex. With the lathe and/or tailstock loose in the shop, it is probably difficult to apply any serious leverage. I would use a tight fitting adjustable wrench and give it a good swat with a 3# rawhide hammer.

                  Every shop should have at least one such hammer. They are non-marring and can deliver some decisive persuasion when needed. I have three or four at strategic locations so they fall readily to hand when needed.
                  Jim H.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The main problem (aside from it being stuck) was that it is a 1.75" "nut", and takes a larger wrench than I have handy. Even the 18" crescent is only 1 5/8" opening.

                    However, it eventually loosened with a copper hammer liberally applied to the handle of the "beater monkey wrench". I expect I need to visit HF for some large wrenches. I think they are about $50 for a set of larger combination wrenches sizes up to 2" or so. Not worth it for better, I don't do that much tractor/etc repair, although I have had some.... had a JD 40U partially apart a couple times.

                    Rawhide hammers are fine..... copper hammers hit harder.

                    I have lots of regular hammers of all types from ball pein to cross and straight pein, planishing, plastic face, copper, brass, lead, dead blow, and others up to 15 lb sledge hammers.

                    The hammer was not the problem, the "nut" was. BTW, it has external threads, it turns out, so it is better called a drilled cap screw rather than a nut. perhaps the "nut" is behind the hammer........
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      liberally applied to the handle of the "beater monkey wrench"...
                      Now that you mention it, I think I used a monkey wrench, too. Below is a picture of a few of my 405 parts freshly painted, for your viewing pleasure.



                      Tom
                      Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                      • #12
                        Looks very nice....

                        I am NOT PAINTING THIS..... at least I don't think so.

                        If I painted it, I'd have to make a stab at re-scraping it, and I do not want to, nor could that possibly increase the "realizable" value of the machine. I just want to sell it, and send a check for the proceeds to the F-I-L. I refuse to make it look re-done when it isn't.

                        Plus, I have 4 other machines which I would far rather scrape if I am scraping anything... and 2 of them are in-progress, or at least they will be when "working indoors season" arrives for real. Got short-changed on that this past spring.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you are talking about scraping the ways, I did not do anything to the ways other than clean a couple minor rust stains with a green scotch pad. My ways (and bearings, etc.) were in really good shape; just a few minor dings by the head stock so I was mostly doing a cosmetic restore for my own use. I did eventually sell it a fews years later when I came a cross a very nice original 9A. When I sold the 405 I only got what I originally paid for it so the nice paint did not make much of a difference. A small manual lathe is only worth so much.

                          Tom
                          Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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