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did ebay change their search?

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  • did ebay change their search?

    I swear I used to be able to search on ebay using a single quotation mark to indicate inches. Example

    cutoff wheel 10"

    Now that for sure doesn't work.

    Anyone know of a workaround?

    metalmagpie
    Last edited by metalmagpie; 06-27-2014, 11:41 AM.

  • #2
    They changed a lot, including NO WILDCARDS (*). Pisses me off. Try dealing with allen bradley switches where exact part numbers, particularly suffixes, are rarely correct. I used * to move down the part number chain until I had a smaller number of hits.

    You can use google or bing to scan ebay but it's not the same.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 12-01-2012, 07:15 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      They changed a lot, including NO WILDCARDS (*). Pisses me off.
      Likewise -- the new rules have broken all my automated searches. Ebay is clearly doing this for some financial reason, but I can't figure what it is.
      They quipped about people searching for misspellings in the email notifying everyone of the change, but how can they be losing money due to people searching for misspellings?
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #4
        but how can they be losing money due to people searching for misspellings?
        I don't sell on EBay so don't know all the details...if they get a percentage of each sale, if I search via misspellings and an item has few bids, wouldn't that mean, overall, the dollar amount of bids would be down, or at least less than if all items had thousands of bidders say...where I noticed it was a search using the same words I always do gets me a bigger pool of non-related items to wade through...other "funny" thing I found was most recent searching on the EBay sight gets you different results than if you just look on EBay after having gone through SeachTempest...assume its related to changes

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        • #5
          Classic "make it better until it is useless"
          or- Fix it till it's broke.
          Last edited by dfw5914; 12-01-2012, 10:38 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
            if they get a percentage of each sale, if I search via misspellings and an item has few bids, wouldn't that mean, overall, the dollar amount of bids would be down, or at least less than if all items had thousands of bidders
            OK, good point. But won't they lose more sales from guys like Lakeside looking for Allen Bradley switches, or me searching for tool steel, now that the wildcard doesn't work?
            Seems like a spell checker might have been a better solution
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              I HATE Ebay search.
              If you type in something odd, Ebay magically ASSUMES you misspelled it, and will show you a bunch of crap that it ASSUMES you were REALLY looking for.
              Drives me up the wall.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lazlo View Post
                Likewise -- the new rules have broken all my automated searches. Ebay is clearly doing this for some financial reason, but I can't figure what it is.

                It's simple : some new recruit genius MBA convinced upper management that making search harder increases the time you spend on the site the increasing the chances of you buying something else.

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                • #9
                  It is in the best interest of search tools like Google and Ebay to create as many clicks as possible to put more adverts under your gaze. There needs also be be a modicum of useful stuff returned or people will give up, but once everyone is in the game there's no better place to go for a better experience.

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                  • #10
                    Now that I no longer work there I can talk about it. I worked on the operations team that maintained the search engine's computers. One of the reasons I left was that they were in the process of replacing a fairly mature, robust search engine based on Solaris, sun hardware and custom C code with a mess of Dell systems running Ubuntu and Java based systems. The database will be in a Hadoop cluster, because that is better for data mining. Program development went from structured design to Agile sprints, with really interesting definition of quality.

                    In order to sell the idea of the change, there were hundreds of promises made to the officers and a huge number of "deficiencies" invented to downplay the usability of the existing system. It was politically incorrect to mention or correct the misinformation.

                    If they kept to the timetable, what you are seeing is the new, improved search system. It should be almost half as capable as the old one. Updates to auctions should take less 4 hours in most cases. If 1/2 of the database is broken, it will quietly give you the 1/2 of the items that it can find.

                    The big drive for the new system was that they thought that they could massage search results so that people will bid more often on more expensive items. The first try created a search that had more people buying less expensive items, costing eBay money. That was quickly rolled back.

                    It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming months. I don't buy on eBay, so I'll watch for the responses here.

                    Just today I was thinking about writing a magazine article on the modern software maturity cycle. From chaotic beginnings they move to the structured environments of ISO 9001 and ITEL , then devolve to rapid prototyping to chaos again. It's quite a strange progression.


                    Dan
                    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                    • #11
                      I almost forgot...

                      The reason for the change is that the new management imported a bunch of managers from Microsoft. They brought their 'experts' with them. These folks could not handle the current software, so they declared it braindead. They managed to blame all their failures on the current environment and the suffocating processes and procedures that supported it. They wanted to run it like they do at Microsoft.

                      Some of the big players in the design and creation of BING are in charge of the eBay search now.



                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                      • #12
                        As soon as you mentioned Microsoft it all became clear.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by danlb View Post
                          Now that I no longer work there I can talk about it. I worked on the operations team that maintained the search engine's computers. One of the reasons I left was that they were in the process of replacing a fairly mature, robust search engine based on Solaris, sun hardware and custom C code with a mess of Dell systems running Ubuntu and Java based systems. The database will be in a Hadoop cluster, because that is better for data mining.
                          I worked for a rather large drugstore before retiring and in my last year there I tried to generate interest in Hadoop and commodity hardware. They ended up buying an Oracle/Sun Exedata barge for a trillion dollars or so and I'm back contracting with them to make it work. It's been sitting in the data center heating the room for months. It is supposed to replace several Oracle RAC clusters running on Dell 1U servers and it has no where near the horsepower to do that (it is a quarter rack - two ODA's, Infiniband, a cisco router, and some storage). Oh well - the pay is good!

                          Too much money for the bang. And of course Agile was introduced last year, too. So far I've never joined a scrum but it is inevitable.

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                          • #14
                            It should always be a case of the best tool for the job. I've noted that the trick is to alter the requirements to fit the desired tool.

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dp View Post
                              It's been sitting in the data center heating the room for months. It is supposed to replace several Oracle RAC clusters running on Dell 1U servers and it has no where near the horsepower to do that (it is a quarter rack - two ODA's, Infiniband, a cisco router, and some storage). Oh well - the pay is good!
                              That's the saving grace to such boondoggles. If you get paid by the hour, it's all good. If you are salaried, it sucks big time.

                              Dan
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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