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OT: How to keep paint in can from skimming over?

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  • OT: How to keep paint in can from skimming over?

    I just finished painting my wood house using Behr fence & deck semi-transparent in 5 gallon containers. I have about 2 gallons left in one of the 5 gal buckets and with the cost of paint ($150), Id like to keep it for later touch up. Is there a reasonable home remedy to displace the oxygen in the can and prevent/delay the skimming over that is certain to happen. I wondered about the mix gas for the mig welder?? Or???

    Edited to add that it is oil based...
    Last edited by Bill Pace; 12-03-2012, 03:06 PM.
    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

  • #2
    It depends on the paint. For oil based pour a small amount of white spirits on top carefully so it doesn't mix and be sure the can is well sealed. It will keep for years. For water thinned paints be sure to keep from freezing. Pour some acrylic polymer extender (available from art supplies stores) over the top and seal.

    Sealing is the most important point by far. You can seal the lid with Vaseline. Don't get it in the paint.
    Last edited by Evan; 12-03-2012, 02:09 PM.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      seal well and leave can upside down. Alistair
      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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      • #4
        Water based paint doesn't keep very long in a steel can either. If its in a plastic container it will keep for years, not so long in a steel can. Eventually the can will rust and start leaking. I think the speed at which the can rusts increases in a direct ratio to the value of items its stored near. Dont ask me how I know this.
        bollie7

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        • #5
          I think the rust starts on the outside and goes in. I have never had a can rust out but then around here you can leave raw steel outside and it takes years to build up light surface rust.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            You post that you have 2 gallons, what i'd do is go to a paint store that mixes paint, and buy two new gallon cans. then fill both right to the top, put lids on and then store it.

            (At least stores that mixed paints always had a stock of new cans they used for that purpose, maybe that has changed?)

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            • #7
              This is an oil based paint in a plastic container with an "O" ring type gasket (like most 5 gallon buckets are nowadays) so is probably much better than the old tin buckets/cans at sealing. I took extra care in cleaning all the mating surfaces of the lid and the cap, so it may hold a good while.

              I thought I had read somewhere of getting an inert gas in the container to slow the skimming factor.
              If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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              • #8
                An old trick that I learned somewhere was to lay some cling wrap on the surface of the paint. I think I may have heard this from someone on the forum in regard to storing polyurethane based paints like Por-15 products.

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                • #9
                  Times two for smaller containers and plastic. I use old coffee containers(plastic) for touch up use, but 2 gallons will take something more creative. Bob.

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                  • #10
                    I had that skinning problem with cans of Red Glyptal. I'd open a new can, use it to seal an armature and field coils of a generator and starter then reseal. It might sit for a month or two then on the next open, it would have a tough skin. Now after opening a new can, I shoot a three or four second burst of Argon from the MIG welder. That seems to do the trick. There's no skin at all when I open the can the next time. It seems to last too after opening, using and resealing. I've even run the can on a paint shaker. I shoot a fresh application of Argon about every third opening but I think this would depend on how breezy it is in your shop. It works for me and no more skinning.

                    Forgot to mention: Flip the pressure wheel up on your wire feed.
                    Last edited by CCWKen; 12-03-2012, 06:13 PM.

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                    • #11
                      A reasonable home remedy (I've used it many times):

                      put a piece of suitably-sized plastic wrap (Saran Wrap) on the surface of the paint.

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                      • #12
                        Baking soda and vinigar. Pour the resulting gas into the can and seal.

                        Ross
                        GUNS Don't kill people
                        Drivers using cell phones do.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by C - ROSS View Post
                          Baking soda and vinigar. Pour the resulting gas into the can and seal.

                          Ross
                          Boy do I love your sig file. The idiot that just about killed me Sept 29th was probably texting as she blew threw the stop sign at 50+ MPH.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tlfamm View Post
                            A reasonable home remedy (I've used it many times):

                            put a piece of suitably-sized plastic wrap (Saran Wrap) on the surface of the paint.
                            Another vote for plastic wrap. I've done it and it works.
                            VitŮŽria, Brazil

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                            • #15
                              At the old work, ALL the paint we got in had a nice cut circle of plastic floating on it for just that reason.

                              The argon is another very good idea, since oil paints tend to work by polymerizing in the presence of oxygen. No oxygen, no polymerizing.

                              The argon also cannot get messed up if the can is tilted or shaken. When someone tipped a new bucket of paint (sealed up) at work, it meant having to fish out the plastic before use, the plastic would get messed up, and not cover anymore... so that bucket needed to be used soon.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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