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Machining an adaptor plate for Atlas milling attachment

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  • Machining an adaptor plate for Atlas milling attachment

    Hi Folks,
    I got myself a lathe milling attachment, being the dope that I am though, its about half the size of what I wanted.... Should have read the fine print in the add...
    In any event I am going to make a plate to adapt it to my King/grizzly 10x22 cross slide so I can play with it while I hunt for one thats the proper size.
    Here is what I am planning on doing, any advice or suggestions would be appreciated:
    1) Buy a piece of 5" diameter x 1" thick round stock for the plate
    2) machine the bottom face of the plate so its true
    3) I need a 1/2" tall nipple to extend into the recess in the bottom of the milling attachment, I plan on machining the plate down leaving the nipple in the centre to connect to the attachment.
    4) Drill the holes in base plate to mate with the T-bolts in the cross slide
    Thats about it!
    Here is what the bottom of the milling attachment looks like, it has 2 set screws that secure it to the nipple on the adapter plate. Does anybody have a baseplate that this vice is from? Perhaps you could measure it or send me a pic of it if so? I am thinking I will leave an 1/8" ridge around the top of the nipple so the vise wont fall off when the set screws are loose?

    Here is what my cross slide looks like, just a plate with T-slots in it:



    Am I going about this the right way? Or is there a better way to mount it?
    My other idea was to use a piece of the 5/8" plate that I have here for the base plate and then make the nipple out of some bar stock and thread it into the base plate, I figured this would not be as rigid as making it out of one piece of steel though...
    Any advice or input for this rookie would be appreciated!
    Cheers,
    Jon

  • #2
    The spigot on the Atlas cross slide is an inverted sort of round dovetail. The mounting grub screws bear on hardened steel pieces with a mating angle to draw the vise down as it is tightened. You might have the proper pieces with the vise.
    Jim H.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by JCHannum View Post
      The spigot on the Atlas cross slide is an inverted sort of round dovetail. The mounting grub screws bear on hardened steel pieces with a mating angle to draw the vise down as it is tightened. You might have the proper pieces with the vise.
      I see, that makes sense... I have tried to search for the dimensions of the spigot unsuccessfully. I will take apart the vise later and see if the fitting is the same, thanks for the tip!
      Cheers,
      Jon

      Comment


      • #4
        Would hardening that piece be something that's feasible at the home shop?
        I seem to remember reading about some simple hardening methods in my old Foxfire books that were pretty strait forward with the use of an open forge... I dont have a forge but I do have oxy/acetylene torches...
        Cheers,
        Jon
        Last edited by Jon Heron; 12-06-2012, 11:30 AM.

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        • #5
          That looks like it's from an atlas 618. If so, I can confirm that the spigot for the vise on the milling attachment is the same as the spigot on the cross slide that the milling attachment attaches to. (is it just me or does that sentence sound clumsy?) I'd suggest getting a piece of durabar to make your adapter with. I found it quite easy to make the spigot in durabar, since the swarf is like dust and it cuts smoothly and easily.

          I can't tell if the little locking pins are in there or not. Try running the grub screws all the way in and see if they push them out. If not, I'd just make replacements out of drill rod. Turn to the minor diameter of the grub screws (can't remember off the top of my head what it is), torch harden(heat to non magnetic and quench), then grind the angle in on a bench grinder. A pin vise will hold them well for grinding.

          HTH,

          J

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks!
            If there were pins for the set screws they are gone now...
            I just called the local metal supermarket and they don't have any Durabar. They do have something called "01 brown stock"? He said its tool steel and it would cost me 22 bucks for a 5"x1" thick slice of it. Would this be OK to use, and harden?
            Cheers,
            Jon

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's a link to a cross slide on eBay that shows the spigot. It is the diameter and height of the recess in the base of the milling attachment. The "dovetail" starts at the bottom of the tapped hole and is probably at a 60* angle.

              http://www.ebay.com/itm/ORIGINAL-ATL...item27cd43cf7b

              Cast iron is a good material for the spigot, the pins are hardened.
              Jim H.

              Comment


              • #8
                For help in finding cast iron: This is a quote from Michael Ward’s scraping article that ran in The Home Shop Machinist magazine, starting in the May/June 2011 issue. Michael lives in the Toronto area and this quote describes his solution for a local source of cast iron.

                “Terra Nova Cast Iron and Steel in Mississauga Ontario has perhaps the best stock of this material in Canada and they will deal with individual’s orders. They are a good bunch to deal with but call ahead, they cater more to industry and aren't set up for walk in traffic.”
                George

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                • #9
                  Thanks!
                  So the "01 brown stock" is no good then eh... I found a place I can get Durabar at (http://www.goldentrianglesteel.com) and its only about 15 minutes from me, they want 23 bucks for a 5x1" slice. Can I machine that stuff with HSS?
                  So am I correct in my understanding that just the pins are hardened and the durabar cast iron is hard enough as is for the base plate / spigot?
                  Cheers,
                  Jon

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hmm... can't help you on the durabar, since I buy mine from metals supermarket. My preference would be for cast iron, but O1 would be great for the pins. Try asking for cast iron bar maybe? That's what durabar is. It's just a trade name for continuous cast cast iron bar. I've got a bit of a love/hate thing going with it. It machines beautifully (comparable in my mind to C360 brass) but the swarf can be abrasive and gets everywhere.

                    J

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Please keep in mind that if my questions seem retarded, its likely cause they are! I am lower then a machinist's first week apprentice when it comes to experience.
                      I am an electrician and am just getting into this whole machining/metal working thing....
                      A couple years ago I learned how to weld so I could make a biodiesel reactor, that was my very first foray into metal working and now it continues
                      Here are some pics of my biodiesel plant where I cut my teeth on welding/fabrication if anybody is interested...
                      http://biodieselpictures.com/viewtopic.php?t=743

                      Cheers,
                      Jon

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by achtanelion View Post
                        Hmm... can't help you on the durabar, since I buy mine from metals supermarket. My preference would be for cast iron, but O1 would be great for the pins. Try asking for cast iron bar maybe? That's what durabar is. It's just a trade name for continuous cast cast iron bar. I've got a bit of a love/hate thing going with it. It machines beautifully (comparable in my mind to C360 brass) but the swarf can be abrasive and gets everywhere.

                        J
                        OK, I found durabar, so I should be careful to clean up the swarf ASAP when I am done then?
                        Cheers,
                        Jon

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Jon,

                          My milling attachment didn't come with the necessary pins either. If yours is the same piece as mine, it should be labeled 10-501 on the back. If not, these dimensions may not apply. My lathe is a 12x36.
                          My locking screws are 3/8"-16 and the pins are 5/16". Mine came with one short pin and two shorter screws than were in the compound, so initially I had to swap the one useful set back and forth when switching attachments. So I simply bought a length of 5/16" drill rod and cut/ground a second set that were long enough to work with the shorter screws. If you don't have some suitable way to hold the drill rod, grind the tip, then cut off your length.
                          You can see a picture of one here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/smudgemo/8250893880/
                          The second photo in the stream shows the back end of the pin and why you don't want the screw pushing up against the spigot.

                          If the sizes for mine are not the same as yours, the general design looks to be.

                          -Ryan
                          My Flickr album

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I knew I knew your handle from somewhere. Don't worry about experience, I got most of mine from making mistakes.

                            Durabar machines great with HSS, but you might need to sharpen again after you get through the crust on it.

                            Lay a cloth on your ways before you start machining (old sheets from value village work great). I usually moisten it with way lube first so the swarf sticks better. Use your 4 jaw if you can, it's good practice indicating in odd shapes (and some durabar can get pretty odd) and it's a LOT easier to take apart the 4 jaw and clean the swarf out after you're done turning.

                            Check with the supplier how much it'll be for 2", 3" etc. Sometimes there's a significant component of the price that's a cut fee. Their saw cuts are almost guaranteed not to be straight, so you'll lose a little to facing, and if you're anything like me a little more when screw up the spigot the first time and have to re-do. It's also really handy to have a piece that's just there for the chuck to hold on to.

                            The way I'd approach this is:

                            1) Chuck up the piece, face and clean up the OD.

                            2) Coat the OD with layout fluid, then scribe (or turn) the length (+ a bit) of the spigot. (BTW, a sharpie makes great hobo layout fluid, but you'll want some dykem or something eventually.)

                            3) Turn the spigot to diameter and a little over length by pointing your cutting tool slightly towards the headstock, feed the length then feed outwards the full depth.

                            4) Use a parting tool to cut a relief just ahead the shoulder of the spigot for your cutting tool to go into.

                            5) Use the compound to feed in at the correct angle for the spigot (I believe it's 60deg, but measure yourself please, I'm just going by my too falliable memory).

                            6) Face to length and chamfer the end of the spigot.

                            Don't forget to measure and test fit along the way.

                            Don't rely too much on what I say, I'm an amateur too. Look at the job, the setup, and the tool and figure out if it's going to work or need adjustment.

                            HTH, and welcome to a great hobby. It'll spend up everything your save using bio and more. :-)

                            J

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                            • #15
                              Jon, nice work on your'e biodiesel tank. Looks good!

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