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Tons and tons of antique iron

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  • Tons and tons of antique iron

    http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/in_mauzy.html

  • #2
    That's a hell of a lathe, just before the D-9 Cat picture. Still has a 4-jaw, carriage, and a tailstock!

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    • #3
      not too far from me. Should plan to visit in the summer.

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      • #4
        Hmm, I think I resemble that.

        It is probably a good thing that I am no closer to it than I am.

        Dave

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        • #5
          There are people who have gone to great pains to keep old steam traction engines running.

          This fellow has dozens of them, mostly intact but rusted solid.

          What I wouldn't give for just ONE, to restore to static-display standards.
          "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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          • #6
            The photography is just as incredible as the content.

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            • #7
              Two or three day's of hands-on inspection of the collection should be a requirement for any ME prior to graduation. Every principal of mechanics, hydraulics, electrics, thermo----can be reviewed. Even the chemistry of rust, and the art of black/white/color photography, and business economics, and, and, and-----------.

              --G

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              • #8
                When I see something like that I have an urge to hire a crop duster and have him spray the whole thing with Rust-Oleum. I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.
                Paul A.

                Make it fit.
                You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.
                  Exactly what I was wondering. Either restore them and pass them on/display them properly, let them go to someone who can, or (and I hate to say it) sell the lot for scrap.

                  Lot of decent radioactivity free steel and iron in that lot, sold to the right scrapper it could net a fair amount of coin.
                  "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                    I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.
                    agreed, probably no net damage to posterity though; it was probably him or the scrapper. He's not making them better or even slowing down the entropy.....and unless he gets busy i doubt he'll get them all restored. Not too much of a stretch to say its the same mental illness you see on that show "hoarders"....although more benign in that its the back 40 rather than the house
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Grind Hard View Post
                      Lot of decent radioactivity free steel and iron in that lot, sold to the right scrapper it could net a fair amount of coin.

                      I'm curious. Not about the radioactivity per se. I used to work at a cyclotron so I'm no stranger to radiation but how does it make its way into modern steel? Does it come in as thorium with the rare earth elements that are added to certain types of steel?

                      What are some applications where you would want "radioactivity free steel"?

                      Nice pics of the old iron by the way.
                      My cup 'o plasma: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1vMfmhM9fg No dialog, just ten minutes of dancing plasma and music. Turn on, tune in, space out.

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                      • #12
                        If I understand correctly all steels made since the dawn of the atomic age have plutonium contamination from the air used in the blast furnaces.

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                        • #13
                          Radioactive sources get mixed into metal all the time, low-level items from nuclear sources get recycled... Things of that nature. Most steel since 1948 has been found to be mildly radioactive to one degree or another. Its typically low enough levels that it won't harm you... but there are applications where even that slight "taint" from recycled power plant parts or accidental contamination from missed sources could be an issue.

                          Radioactivity free steel would be used in an application such as the framework for a particle accelerator target, or labware used in applications where stray emissions could influence results.



                          Interesting to note... the power plant back east of me Ginna Station underwent a steam-generator replacement back in the 90s. The worn out SG units were stored in a vault on the plant site, apparently despite their radioactivity several companies bid on salvaging the special tube-steel alloy. They have to wait X number of years for the radiation to die back (think I was told 25 years) then they can come and get them and melt 'em down.
                          "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Grind Hard View Post
                            There are people who have gone to great pains to keep old steam traction engines running.

                            This fellow has dozens of them, mostly intact but rusted solid.

                            What I wouldn't give for just ONE, to restore to static-display standards.
                            There is a steam and engine show local to me that they do a few times a year. They have a big steam tractor there that they get out and run the saw mill with. I remember it when I was a small kid, but it is cool to still see it working when I go there.

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                            • #15
                              Apparently the author saw this first about 40 years ago. It seems that there is a lot more evidence of hoarding than there is of restoration. There was no mention of any of it having been sold either.

                              If that's the case assuming that the owner will keep it until he dies and will not be maintaining any (or not much anyway) it seems that his inheritors or his executor are going to have quite job clearing it out.

                              The sale catalogue will be interesting.

                              My guess is that when it is sold some will go the enthusiasts and what is left will be left for a low bid by the scrappers.

                              I wonder what would happen if some here who enthuse about a particular item were to be given to them "as is" to remove in say 30 days.

                              It will be even more interesting to see how much the new owners get done as regards restoration or will it be a case of moving it from one junk heap to another and then to the scrappers.

                              I was impressed at how well the grass was cut in those pics.

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