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Variable speed Rotary power source

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  • Variable speed Rotary power source

    This is definitly not rocket science---BUT--If, like me you occasionally need a variable speed rotary power source, don't overlook your common 3/8" variable speed drill. A couple of pieces of wood screwed together with a drill body size cut-out between them, and a threaded rod or long bolt (tap the hole in the wood to suit). I even added a fancy knurled knob to mine, simply because I already had it left over from another project. It works great!!! Screw the threaded rod in or out against the drill trigger, and you can turn the drill off or turn it on and screw the bolt in until you reach the speed range you desire. Most of these drills have a reverse as well. This is probably the lowest tech tip you will see this year.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    You know, every time I think of doing something like that it seems it will be a big hassle. Lots of work. Your method is darn smart. Not too much time involved and re-useable! I did notice the nice shaping and curves! Thanks

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    • #3
      Nice idea!

      Makes me feel silly though, I've used drills as power power sources hundreds of times before but somehow never thought of building a mount for them.

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      • #4
        I've been using electric drills as power sources for years, but there is simply no good way to hold the damn things. The other night I decided to make something that was quick, cheap, and re-usable, and that could be screwed down to a base for use with o-ring drive belts to drive model machinery. This seems to fill the bill very nicely.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #5
          Nice solution Brian, i can see where the odd time that would be a handy jig/bracket to have around.

          Once you have the bracket/clamp fabbed up,it could be used in a number of places.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
            I've been using electric drills as power sources for years, but there is simply no good way to hold the damn things. The other night I decided to make something that was quick, cheap, and re-usable, and that could be screwed down to a base for use with o-ring drive belts to drive model machinery. This seems to fill the bill very nicely.
            There is.

            Buy a European drill with a turned parallel section on it - for gripping:

            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...xxon_mill3.jpg

            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...abo_drill3.jpg

            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...abo_drill2.jpg

            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...xxon_mill9.jpg

            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...abo_drill1.jpg

            Further, all these drills speeds can be set with a knurled wheel and left set where the trigger is not involved.
            Last edited by oldtiffie; 12-17-2012, 10:26 PM.

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            • #7
              I have a number of Japanese electric drills and they all have that mounting collar. I am suprised they are not universal, at least in the smaller drills.

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              • #8
                *looks at air drill with handle*... Ah.

                Also, I often use my workmate (table thats a wooden clamp) to hold my belt sander upside down. Sometimes angle grinder too.

                Also put wire brushes and such into my drill press and raise the table all the way up (or swing it right out of the way!)


                Nice idea about using the wood to prevent crushing the frame, note that lots of those drills use the plastic frame as the housing for the motor and gearbox/everything, so crushing it could easily cause things to start rubbing/binding.
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                • #9
                  I bought a rotary tool once because of the easy straight collar mounting. Turned it into a dedicated laminate trimmer. Then I bought a second one (these are laminate trimmers with speed control) and used it to trim some cast iron on a lathe bed- again a special set-up. Now I'm about to utilize it to form a sort of miniature table saw- one with a three inch diamond blade. The straight mounting collar will make it possible to mount the table easily.

                  The speed controls don't have the range that a drill does though. A drill can essentially be run almost down to zero rpm. If the trigger can be reliably set to hold a steady speed at whatever rpm, then it opens up a wider range of possibilities.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    drill motors

                    I NEVER could figure out why all drill motors are shaped like a football. why can't they make a square one. Set it down- bolt it down -step on it. At least it it would be parallel to some thing. Put a level on it. What a concept. John

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                    • #11
                      Looks like a great way to power feed my rotary table.!

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                      • #12
                        football shape- yeah, there's nothing like that to help you drill straight by hand- not. I recently bought a right-angle drill (made where else? ) and it's a football. Before that I bought three cordless drills, four chargers, four led lights- but no batteries- for about $5 total. All the drills are footballs. I'm thinking of getting some of that round-cornered 'square' aluminum tubing and making new bodies for them- hopefully I can find some tubing which is just a bit larger in diameter than the chucks. That way I can lay the drill on its side and not have the chuck grind against the material. Plus I can mount the power mosfet to the aluminum for a vast improvement in heat-sinking. What a concept. I'll make my own handle/battery packs since I have enough cells to re-fit all of them. I'll never have a situation where I have too many cordless drills.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Funny thing here- I've been impressed with the smoothness and range of the speed control on some of these corded drills. But probably because they are made more to resist end pressure against a drill bit, the output shaft almost always has lots of wobble.

                          You can buy a corded drill with a nice speed control and reverse, sometimes with more than one geared speed change, for pretty cheap in many cases. You might be tempted to purchase one strictly for a 'clamped down' use. Just make sure it it up to the task if there will be side pressure, and the play has to be minimal.

                          Two or three of my cordless drills actually have a ball bearing at the front and a needle roller at the rear of the output shaft. In these the shaft is very stable and much better suited to side loads. Ironically, in one of them the case had little strength and wasn't actually able to hold the bearings in place very well. That one got rebuilt into an aluminum housing.

                          Lately I've started to pay some attention to corded drills. Since this topic has come up, I think I'll look into the offerings a little deeper now. It has blown me away to see how much thrift stores, etc want for a used corded drill. Virtually all of the ones I've seen are worn out.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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