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Interesting threading dies

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  • Interesting threading dies

    I just came across these MT2 threading die holders. I thought they looked useful.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    first thing one should make with a new lathe, they're a must have imo. I like the section holding the die to be much longer so I can hollow it out and thread several times the die thickness. Use them either straight up or to chase single point threads. Single point roughing ensures its straight, but you don't have to be as fussy with the tool shape or measure the thread. It also often leaves a better finish. For larger threads, put a bar in the hole so the carriage takes the torque not the taper
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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    • #3
      Sure would be a nice set to have at lathe, though I wouldn't use them above M16, as the torque needed is huge and getting the taper/tang to hold it is not ideal. But in my usual work they would work nicely, as I'm using a toolpost MT3 holder where is a drill chuck usually or larger drills. Just change that die holder and have at it.

      McGyver, how would you get the bar in the hole to contact the carriage, as usually the Morse tapers do not rotate and thus the hole could be pointing north of carriage?

      But, the easiest at the moment for me is an SPV threading chuck with changeable holders for threading taps & dies. Yes, it costs money, but makes it so nice and easy on you, the tools and the machine. What I especially like is the clucth mechanism, once it triggers it doesn't go click-click-click-click, but instead just clicks once and then rotates freely. When you reverse it, the clutch resets and operates normally again
      Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
        Sure would be a nice set to have at lathe, though I wouldn't use them above M16, as the torque needed is huge and getting the taper/tang to hold it is not ideal. But in my usual work they would work nicely, as I'm using a toolpost MT3 holder where is a drill chuck usually or larger drills. Just change that die holder and have at it.

        McGyver, how would you get the bar in the hole to contact the carriage, as usually the Morse tapers do not rotate and thus the hole could be pointing north of carriage?

        But, the easiest at the moment for me is an SPV threading chuck with changeable holders for threading taps & dies. Yes, it costs money, but makes it so nice and easy on you, the tools and the machine. What I especially like is the clucth mechanism, once it triggers it doesn't go click-click-click-click, but instead just clicks once and then rotates freely. When you reverse it, the clutch resets and operates normally again
        I use a SPV tapping chuck also. I just bought a Bilz quick change chuck to go on it. I might have to make an adapter to go from the Jacobs taper to a B16 taper. I like the SPV tapping head much better than a Tapmatic. I bought the Bilz so I can set the clutch on each tap holder for the torque for each size tap. That way I can leave the tapping head clutch set at maximum all the time.
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
          McGyver, how would you get the bar in the hole to contact the carriage, as usually the Morse tapers do not rotate and thus the hole could be pointing north of carriage?
          well thats a good question . I made provisions on mine, built a very long time ago, to screw a bar in to take the torque. Never use it, I either use them just small stuff or chase large stuff single pointed and the MT can handle it. I suppose I'd try to insert into the tailstock gently with the bar pressing firmly on the carriage then tap in place, hand pressure preload....but since I don't actually do this a more apropos remark on my behalf would have been "make sure you figure out how to take the torque if you're doing large coarse threads.

          you could make one arbor with multiple floating heads with torque bars, but imo that would be less convenient the large majority of the time when the MT can take the torque. maybe a system with a locking pin that coudl do either would be the way to go
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #6
            You just put the bar in and seat the taper with the bar in proper position (or close to it). In most tailstocks the tang doesn't engage.
            Southwest Utah

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            • #7
              Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
              You just put the bar in and seat the taper with the bar in proper position (or close to it). In most tailstocks the tang doesn't engage.
              I think Jaakko's point was because the MT will only move when its released, hows the bar going to do anything to stop it from being released unless its already taking a sizable portion of the force.
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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