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  • Grinding wheel Identifcation?

    Back a bit ago i bought a bunch of shop stuff out of a deceased friends shop.

    Got a bunch of new grinding wheels of all sizes, grades etc.

    Have a new unopened case of 6 of these wheels marked:

    "Norton" - G103

    39c601-k8vk and- 6in x 3in x 32 mm.

    Anyone know what these are for?

    Tried googling norton and could find nothing listed with that #. Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by sasquatch View Post
    Back a bit ago i bought a bunch of shop stuff out of a deceased friends shop.

    Got a bunch of new grinding wheels of all sizes, grades etc.

    Have a new unopened case of 6 of these wheels marked:

    "Norton" - G103

    39c601-k8vk and- 6in x 3in x 32 mm.

    Anyone know what these are for?

    Tried googling norton and could find nothing listed with that #. Thanks.
    39c601-k8vk

    39- Proprietary code for the abrasive
    C- silicon carbide
    60- grit size
    The next letter could be I or K, indicates hardness
    8- structure- amount of open space in the wheel
    v- vitrified bond
    k proprietary code, in this case referring to the bond
    These wheels are rather wide but are suitable for nonferrous metals due to the silicon carbide abrasive and hard bond and open structure. You should still be careful of loading, coolant will help.

    Oops I just realized that these are green silicon carbide wheels, for roughing tungsten carbide.
    Last edited by tdmidget; 12-19-2012, 10:46 AM.

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    • #3
      Google for Crystolon Wheel.

      Gene

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      • #4
        Thanks guys i still cannot locate any other info on here about these wheels though.
        Seems the Norton site is not comming up for some reason.

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        • #5
          The "32 mm" bore is fairly new in the US but common on newer machines and in the metric areas.

          The common/old bore was/is 1 1/4" = 31.75mm. The 40mm bore size is 1.2598" (nominal) and is near enought to `1.26" so a 0.005" shim between the wheel bore and the grinder spindle is a quick, easy and effective solution.

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          • #6
            Go to

            http://www.nortonindustrial.com/advs...e&contentType=

            At bottom of page, download "Toolroom Grinding Wheel Selection Chart"

            Gene

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
              The "32 mm" bore is fairly new in the US but common on newer machines and in the metric areas.

              The common/old bore was/is 1 1/4" = 31.75mm. The 40mm bore size is 1.2598" (nominal) and is near enought to `1.26" so a 0.005" shim between the wheel bore and the grinder spindle is a quick, easy and effective solution.
              Good point Tiffie , as this becoming common, on it's way to being standard.

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              • #8
                Thanks guys, i,m just trying to figure out if i have an application i could use these stones for.

                The 3in width is a bit puzzling.

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                • #9
                  As I mentioned in my reply to you or another good forum, the wheel is likely used on a small centerless grinder, such as a Glebar or Royal Master.

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                  • #10
                    Yes, and many thanks Pixman!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tdmidget View Post
                      39c601-k8vk

                      39- Proprietary code for the abrasive
                      C- silicon carbide
                      60- grit size
                      The next letter could be I or K, indicates hardness
                      8- structure- amount of open space in the wheel
                      v- vitrified bond
                      k proprietary code, in this case referring to the bond
                      These wheels are rather wide but are suitable for nonferrous metals due to the silicon carbide abrasive and hard bond and open structure. You should still be careful of loading, coolant will help.

                      Oops I just realized that these are green silicon carbide wheels, for roughing tungsten carbide.
                      Do you just know this off the top of your head, or is there a decoder ring? I've been looking for the same type of info.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Most every abrasive wheel company has a published reference chart. No doubt in references like The Machinist's Handbook as well.

                        http://www.adgrind.com/abrasives/wheel_shapes.htm

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Forestgnome View Post
                          Do you just know this off the top of your head, or is there a decoder ring? I've been looking for the same type of info.
                          Pretty sure that Norton and most quality mfgs publish the code but Maybe I can find it in my old apprenticeship papers and scan it in and post here.

                          Found it believe it or not on wikipedia:

                          There are five characteristics of a cutting wheel: material, grain size, wheel grade, grain spacing, and bond type. They will be indicated by codes on the wheel's label.
                          Material, the actual abrasive, is selected according to the hardness of the material being cut.

                          Grain size, from 8 (coarsest) 1200 (finest), determines the physical size of the abrasive grains in the wheel. A larger grain will cut freely, allowing fast cutting but poor surface finish. Ultra-fine grain sizes are for precision finish work.
                          Wheel grade, from A (soft) to Z (hard), determines how tightly the bond holds the abrasive. Grade affects almost all considerations of grinding, such as wheel speed, coolant flow, maximum and minimum feed rates, and grinding depth.
                          Grain spacing, or structure, from 1 (densest) to 16 (least dense). Density is the ratio of bond and abrasive to air space. A less-dense wheel will cut freely, and has a large effect on surface finish. It is also able to take a deeper or wider cut with less coolant, as the chip clearance on the wheel is greater.
                          Wheel bond, how the wheel holds the abrasives, affects finish, coolant, and minimum/maximum wheel speed.
                          • Vitrified (V)
                          • Resinoid (B)
                          • Silicate (S)
                          • Shellac (E)
                          • Rubber (R)
                          • Metal (M)
                          • Oxychloride (O)
                          Last edited by tdmidget; 12-20-2012, 03:31 PM.

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                          • #14
                            A Very good interesting read, thanks for that.

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