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A Call for Beta Testers for a Lathe Electronic Edge Finder

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  • A Call for Beta Testers for a Lathe Electronic Edge Finder

    Mark Cason and I have developed an edge finder that simply connects to many brands of lathes with no modifications to the machine and detects when the tip of the cutter comes in contact with the workpiece. Accuracy is better than +/- 0.0001".

    Eventually it will be offered for sale by Mark's daughter. But for now we want to be sure it works reliably and has a good user interface. So we are enlisting beta testers to help us test it out.

    You will receive a Lathe Electronic Edge Finder, Model 1. Mark Cason will cover the cost of the device plus shipping within the USA. You will also receive a draft of the user's guide from me via email.

    In exchange, you must commit to using the LEEF at least 3 times a week starting in the week you receive it and ending when your results are consistently good. You must take detailed notes on your experience and email these notes to us within a day of each use. If the device fails to work as expected, we reserve the right to get it back for study and will ask you to take data from your lathe.

    We also expect you to read each version of the user's guide and supply us comments and suggestions on making it better.

    To qualify, you must have a lathe with a spindle resistance greater than 3 ohms. Details on how to take this measurement will be supplied upon request.

    Thanks!

    Rick Sparber
    Rick Sparber

    [email protected]
    web site: rick.sparber.org

  • #2
    Rick,

    I would really love to test your edge finder, but my shop is still in storage. Rats!

    Good luck with it.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

    Comment


    • #3
      Are you primarily interested in CNC lathes or do you also want to try it out on manual machines? If so I'm interested. I'd also like to know the length of the testing period i.e. a month, 6 weeks, 6 months, a year?

      Comment


      • #4
        Is this some kind of contact edge finder?

        John
        My Web Site

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        • #5
          Love to but none of my lathes (Polamco TUM35 and Emco V10P) have a tool post to spindle resistance greater than 0.2ohm (Fluke 87) including the leads... which measure at about 0.15 ohm. What's your measurement methodology? It's hard for me to imagine a decent lathe with greater than 3 ohms... so what am I I missing?
          Last edited by lakeside53; 12-25-2012, 01:11 AM.

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          • #6
            I'm pretty sure the OP meant "3 Ohm or less". Otherwise, it may take quite an effort to find testers. Maybe the Chinese stuff with wooden bearings or loose fit everywhere would work.
            Mike
            WI/IL border, USA

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            • #7
              Give us a brief on the measurement method. I can check the 8 Clausing-Metosa at school but not till school starts again in Jan. I have several Ohmeters, that
              should be adequate. It will be interesting to see how this works out.
              ...Lew...

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              • #8
                Mine measure .268 ohms with a HP 34401A 4 wire ohm meter. A lot of meters will not read accurately at low resistances.

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                • #9
                  They may have meant 3 ohm or more - lot easier to detect, but, that's not going to fly. Of course a rigid non-conductive material around the tooling will solve that, and then we can use a light bulb !
                  Last edited by lakeside53; 12-24-2012, 10:21 PM.

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                  • #10
                    My guess is they are measuring a local change in resistance when the tool comes in contact with the work. That is not going to work for most lathes.

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                    • #11
                      I'm in the dicktatorship of outer Mogol I mean Canaduh so I'm out. But when you can? Post the user manual here. You won't find better input about what it should be and all for free. I'm real interested in how it gets slaved to each different tool point and at those repeatable accuracy levels. If your claims can be obtained by the average user? you'll have a winner.

                      Pete

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                      • #12
                        Thought I was seeing double, is not an electronic edge finder more or less acting the same as tool positioning in this thread http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...nging-with-CNC and like in the linked video from that thread http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWnfi...ature=youtu.be, tool tip touches, lights a bulb, enters location...?

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                        • #13
                          I've more or less been following Rick's work on this project for quite some time. I know he can measure some very small changes in resistance now and I'm fairly sure it's very low spindle bearing resistance he needs tested --he's made two versions, the first was useful with stuff like old Atlas lathes which quite often have high resistance on the bearings (high being comparative). I think the latest iteration is about very low voltages across very low resistances (zero chance of bearing damage from spark jumping in the bearings, is a major design criteria I believe). He's done some quite impressive stuff from what I've seen of it, and I suspect what he needs tested is even more refined.

                          But I'm sure he will be back and speak for himself. I'll just go so far as to say he's quite gifted and seems to be honorable and honest about what he's doing.

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                          • #14
                            here's a youtube of an earlier version he was working on (I don't know if this is the latest thing or not):
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ilY9Pse7TU

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                            • #15
                              To those of you who question the spindle resistance requirement, have you measured it while the spindle is turning? I suspect a spindle, like my SB, that has a journal bearing will have substantively larger resistance when spinning than at rest. At rest, the weight of the spindle will force the oil out of the area between it's bottom and the bearing surface and metal to metal contact will exist. When it is up to speed, the spindle rides on a film of oil, as in non-conductive oil and the resistance will go up. If there is no load on the thrust bearing, the spindle resistance can be fairly high - in relative terms at least.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              Make it fit.
                              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                              Comment

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