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Source for cheap spur gears?

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  • Source for cheap spur gears?

    A few years ago I came across a very small (micro) bead roller on the odds-n-ends table at Harbor Freight. Like a dumbass, I didn't buy it. I've never been able to find the same model or anything similar. We are now creating a lot of piping for our turbo systems and a nice small bead roller would be perfect for the ends. So, looks like I'll make one. I've found 1/2 bore gears for ~$15 each, but there has to be cheaper ones abound. Any ideas (other than that I am really dumb for not buying the small bead roller in the first place)?

    Thanks, Derek

  • #2
    Originally posted by derekg View Post
    I've found 1/2 bore gears for ~$15 each, but there has to be cheaper ones abound.
    Honestly $15 sure seems cheap to me.

    By chance is this what you're looking for?
    http://www.harborfreight.com/18-inch...kit-34104.html

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    • #3
      Not sure how many teeth you're after, but how about old change wheels from a lathe? Usual sources - Ebay, CL etc.

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
        Honestly $15 sure seems cheap to me.

        By chance is this what you're looking for?
        http://www.harborfreight.com/18-inch...kit-34104.html
        Mike, the one I need is about 20% of that size. Those are great, but some of the pipes are only 1" ID and those dies start around 1-1/2".

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        • #5
          Possibly old copy/fax machines or similar items?

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          • #6
            http://www.pic-design.com/ and/or http://www.wmberg.com/

            If'n you are monkeying around with hot turbos, 15 bucks per anything shouldn't be a worrying point.

            --G
            Last edited by Guido; 12-25-2012, 02:13 PM.

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            • #7
              No gears needed.







              Andy

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              • #8
                Andy, Thanks for posting that. Very good food for thought. Probably going on the to do list.
                Byron Boucher
                Burnet, TX

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                • #9
                  OK, OK! Obviously the upper, concave roller must be adjustable in the vertical direction and the bolt on the top is probably for adjusting it. But, how is it mounted to allow this? There are no obvious sliding mechanisms on the outside. At least, none that show in the photos.

                  So how is it built?
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  Make it fit.
                  You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                  • #10
                    The top shaft must either run in a vertical slot (which you can't see) or could be mounted eccentrically.

                    I would like to know the particulars though...

                    doug

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by derekg View Post
                      there has to be cheaper ones abound. Any ideas
                      How about the gears out of an old engine oil pump or hydraulic pump?

                      Mike

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                      • #12
                        If you are willing to do some machining then timing gears from a couple of appropriate size engines might do the job. Small engines tend to have straight cut spur gears.
                        Don Young

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                          OK, OK! Obviously the upper, concave roller must be adjustable in the vertical direction and the bolt on the top is probably for adjusting it. But, how is it mounted to allow this? There are no obvious sliding mechanisms on the outside. At least, none that show in the photos.

                          So how is it built?
                          Originally posted by michigan doug View Post
                          The top shaft must either run in a vertical slot (which you can't see) or could be mounted eccentrically.

                          I would like to know the particulars though...

                          doug

                          The top die rides on a shaft, the T-bolt threw the top pushes the shaft and die down, the spring on the end of the shaft keeps the top die against the body and allows for the up/down adjustment.





                          Andy

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