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Installed a new longer bench top today, plumbing question.

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  • Installed a new longer bench top today, plumbing question.

    Thanks to a good buddy of mine donating his old kitchen to me when he was renovating I now have a longer bench. I have no plumbing in my garage but always wanted a sink for washing up and rinsing parts. My idea is a simple 5 gallon bucket with a hole in the top for the drain from the sink and a line out the side to feed a 110v pump (switched, thinking fountain pump) that feeds the faucet. Looking for good ideas for quick hookup and disconnect for removing the pail to dump out and refills. I am also thinking of the same deal for the dishwasher you see in the pic. I hear they work good with simple green for cleaning parts?



    Andy

  • #2
    I don't think a small fountain pump will have the flow you'll want.
    They lose flow pretty quickly as head increases and larger capacity
    ones get very spendy very fast.
    I think I would use a small (360 GPH) bilge pump for a boat -
    It's 12 volt but could run off a 2+ amp wall wort.
    Their designed to deal with nasty stuff that gets into the bilges
    Diesel, bits of bait, antifreeze, dirt, oil, etc.
    About $20-25

    edit: and they're submersible, so just drop it in the bucket
    and run your hose out the top.
    Last edited by Scottike; 12-28-2012, 08:05 PM.
    I cut it twice, and it's still too short!
    Scott

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    • #3
      Where are you going to be dumping the bucket at? If the answer is anywhere other than your septic or city sewer system, why not just put a drain to the outside and forget the bucket? Are you planning a holding tank for the water? I don't see another reason for the pump. I am not sure if they all are, but my dishwasher required a hot water line for it.

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      • #4
        Well I was thinking of recycling the water in the bucket for a week or so and then dump it out and bring fresh water in since I don't have a water supply in the shop.
        Andy

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        • #5
          I got ya. I thought you were using the bucket for the drain only and were supplying the water from outside and pumping it in. If it were me I would try and find a water source if possible, even if it was a hose run from the house. Probably wouldn't work so well in the winter though. Clean water would be more important than just recycled dirty water. You could just make a built in parts washer tank in place of the sink that would be less work.

          As for the dishwasher, I think you would need a pump that puts out what a water supply line from your house would. I would also look into filtering the used simple green on the return back into the bucket. A submersible heater may also be helpful for the bucket of simple green.

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          • #6
            I'm going to assume your shop is in an attached garage. Running water & sewer lines under a slab is not as difficult as it was in the past. You no longer have to break up the concrete. Instead you have horizontal holes bored under the slab for your lines. You may even be able to run your supply lines through the wall if your house has a crawl space or basement. In the long run I think you'd be better off & happier with the set up with a proper pumping system.

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            • #7
              Around here, boring horizontal holes is pretty spendy, but otherwise I agree with Dr. Stan. I have completely revamped the plumbing in my house and even doing it the right way is pretty simple. If you want to bodge it, a saddle tap in an existing line is a pretty simple solution. Run it to some pex or cpvc out to the garage. Just keep in mind that saddle tap gaskets will harden with age and can start to weep or, if bumped, can turn into a full fledged, water-spraying type leak.

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              • #8
                Just go buy a parts washer and be done with the job and take the sink out or make a cover and go on. Or just use an overhead gravity feed tank to feed your sink. 5 gallon bucket under the sink. Simple rag filter over the catch bucket under the sink. When full dump it in the overhead storage tank.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #9
                  I'm trying to think what parts you would wash with water. How about a solvent based parts washer?

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                  • #10
                    This is a detached shop with no way to get a water supply to or in. The dish washer has a heater in it already for heating the water. I also already have a solvent parts washer but to get parts real clean they should be washed off in water after the solvent. Plus my paint guns don't like dirty solvent baths. I also won't have any water in the winter in the shop, this would only be during the summer months. The one big reason I want the sink is for washing my hands when they are very dirty and I don't want to take the greasy slimy junk in the house to wash off. I don't plan to get super clean with the recycled water but enough so that I don't make a mess out of my house when I come in.

                    I just remember how nice having a sink in the shop is from school and I find myself saying many times "boy I wish I had a sink and some water right about now".
                    Andy

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                    • #11
                      My shop is detached and has running hot & cold water & is hooked up to the sewer system. Its just a matter of digging trenches, laying lines, and hooking them up the the existing system. I installed mine while I was building the shop, so that made it much easier to run the supply & sewer pipes through the slab. However retrofitting the shop should not be that much trouble. Your sink & dish washer are against an exterior wall so drilling holes in the floor and just digging a trench under the footing is more a matter of time & effort. I had to do something similar to connect with the water line under floor of the house. I do not know what your building codes are like in your neck of the woods, but I'd make sure you go below the frost line. I only had to go 3 feet, but I suspect you'll have to go at least 6 if not 8 feet.

                      If you're planning to only have water in the summer it should not be a major engineering effort to plumb the inside of the shop and just supply it via a garden hose in the summer. A larger hose run to a sewer line clean out should take care of the waster water. However, I strongly suspect you'll like running water in the shop so much you'll soon be digging trenches.

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                      • #12
                        One problem with running lines is the shop is on a separate lot not part of my house lot. Running a garden hose wouldn't be a bad deal but I really don't want a hose laying across my lawn all summer and have to move it every time I mow.
                        Andy

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                        • #13
                          You should be able to get the hose low enough through the grass to not have the mower hit it. I had to do this with an extension cord to my shop.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vpt View Post
                            One problem with running lines is the shop is on a separate lot not part of my house lot. Running a garden hose wouldn't be a bad deal but I really don't want a hose laying across my lawn all summer and have to move it every time I mow.
                            What is the distance from your shop to your house & how well do you get along with the land owner(s) between your shop & your house?

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                            • #15
                              Get some kind of tank and capture rain water off of your roof.
                              James Kilroy

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