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Moore & Wright Precision Tools???

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  • Moore & Wright Precision Tools???

    A very basic measuring tool but how did they get it so wrong?
    Their quality control is certainly off by a few percent or is that degrees?








  • #2
    Even without measuring the angles, that gauge looks really bad. What about the 55% marking and the hole punched through the printing, which looks like very cheap screened text. I would not discount the possibility that they have gone way down market with the cheapest possible Chinese outsourced gauge, but it is also possible that the whole thing is just a cheap copy.
    Bill

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    • #3
      Sad to say but Moore & Wright may be doing a bit of "badge" engineering i.e. sourcing the parts from the cheapest supplier and marking them up as made by M&W, a lot of the quality companies are I believe doing this to survive? Then again it may just be a one off but I would imagine they are stamped out and you would hope the tooling was passed off as ok before production started.
      Tony

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      • #4
        Why are they using % when they should be using degrees? Very sloppy item whether UK or China made.

        Ian.

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        • #5
          This is what a real one looks like:



          Cheers

          .

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          • #6
            Quite possibly a counterfeit.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #7
              It got flipped around for printing, but that 47.5 degrees is still of based on your measurement.
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SGW View Post
                Quite possibly a counterfeit.
                exactly what I was thinking

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SGW View Post
                  Quite possibly a counterfeit.
                  interesting....luther whats its pedigree; did it come from a reputable source?

                  The consumer has a power today like never before; 20 years ago all you could do was be annoyed/return it. Today you with this thread you can have 1,000's see it and empathize. Its sort of for not though if they're not aware - consider sending the link to the office of the president. Despite the frequent ignorant rhetoric, senior execs are bright and the good ones know brand is the most valuable thing they have, but nothing changes if they don't know.

                  What would you do if you were the President of M&W and became aware of this?
                  .

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                  • #10
                    The Moore and Wright brand is owned by Bowers Metrology. I'm not sure who owns them these days. I have a lot of M&W equipment as would most older UK machinists. The quality of that equipment was good, perhaps not the best available, but certainly good enough. I really hope that the problem is just counterfeiting and not 'real' M&W product. I do agree that that in either case a complaint to the president of the company is definitely appropriate. Product like that will damage their brand beyond recall.
                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      I doubt that a chicom shop would go to the trouble to counterfeit a M&W threading gage. The dozen or so they would sell would hardly be worthwhile. The counterfeit money is in Nike and such.

                      It is more than likely an example what many have discussed here on how the chicom product can end up when the manufacturer(? agent?) is left to his own devices and not continuously monitored.

                      It is also a good example of lots of this merchandise in that it kind of looks like what it should be, but just doesn't get it right in the translation. Not a big deal when it is a simple gage, but when the same philosophy is applied to a lathe, nothing good will result.
                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        what equipment / program did you use to measure those angles

                        all the best.markj

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                        • #13
                          Looks to me that it was marked on the "back". That's still no excuse for the errors in angles.

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                          • #14
                            Its not just the errors in angles; the text itself is incorrect. That is not a one-off error, the whole batch will be using the same incorrect screen printed text. Incidentally, I have checked pre-ground HSS screwcutting tools on a toolmakers microscope before. They were out by at least half a degree, not symetrically, which I would consider unacceptable. The combination of that faulty gauge and those faulty tools means that screw threads could be badly out.

                            Where can you buy a guaranteed quality screwcutting gauge regardless of price?
                            Bill

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                            • #15
                              To be fair, if you're getting into grinding tools to within half a degree, you should probably be setting the angle on your grinding jig / T+C grinder, not eyeballing it on a metal template? The distance is too short to detect a deviation, I would imagine, let alone correct it reliably or quickly.

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