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How do I recess my flywheel face?

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  • How do I recess my flywheel face?

    I need a quick tutorial on how to machine the recess into the face of my Odds and Ends flywheels. I have, up untill now, muddled my way thru countless flywheels using a parting off tool ground to a wicked taper and making a series of plunge cuts into the face of the rotating flywheel. (The parting off tool held at 90 degrees to how you would normally see it mounted.) This works---sort of. Its crude, its scary as Hell, and it leaves a dreadfull finish which must be sanded out to be even close to smooth. I could, I suppose mount the flywheel on my rotary table in the mill and using an endmill crank the rotary table around and around----But that hardly seems reasonable either. How do I, with the machinery I have, cut the recess in a better manner in my lathe? I am not set up to cut on the back side of my lathe or to mount tools upside down. The flywheel is aluminum. The recess is going to be 5/16" deep on both sides. Don't be alarmed that the outer rim looks thin--there is a section of heavy wall steel pipe getting Loctited to the o.d. The o.d. of the part shown is 3.625"---Any help would be appreciated.----Brian

    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 02-12-2013, 07:56 PM.
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Use a HSS boring bar. That's all I do. Carbide will not like the interrupted cuts at the holes.
    Bricolage anyone?....one of lifes fun games.

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    • #3
      I would vote for the rotary table on the mill as the safe easy way. You get a good finish that way too. However all that cranking can wear a guy slick pretty fast. I would put a V belt pulley in place of the crank handle and motorize that part of it. Then the job becomes easy and enjoyable.

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      • #4
        First, I would put the holes in after I cut the recesses, Futher I would grind a HSS tool , or maybe two, to cut the recesses. I have also used the boring bar to do this, but it's difficult to cut the hub side without using reverse which is unnerving if you have a threaded chuck. I personally like HSS tool bit, every time you grind a new one , you have a permanent addition to your arsenal. Pretty soon you have one for any occasion. Bob.

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        • #5
          I'd simply mount it normally, then do a facing operation from the inside to the outside.

          Using an SCLCR boring bar will make it downright easy to do. If necessary I'd use a short, thin tool to make the cuts near the hub to provide clearance for the boring bar. Then it's a matter of plunge in .025 or so and back the cross-slide out till you reach the rim.

          I've also done this with a simple 5/16 HSS tool.

          Dan
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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          • #6
            Brian

            Left hand and a Right hand HSS bit. Mark out the hub and rim. Start either left to right or the opposite and plunge in what ever depth of cut your lathe can handle while using the crossfeed and cut to the opposite side. Repeat until close to or at depth. Once it is roughed out use the two different cutters to clean up the hub and the rim. If you want a tapered hub and/or rim use the compound set at the desired angle to do the clean-up. If the hub and rim are tapered mark out both the inner and outer diameter so you leave material for the taper.
            Do any holes/spokes after reducing the thickness. With Aluminum and Steel I would be tempted to shrink the rim in place.

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            • #7
              Just to make things clearer, none of the holes or slots (except for the center hole) are in the aluminum disc right now.
              Brian Rupnow

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              • #8
                The plans and instructions for building this engine in the Shop Wisdom of Philip Duclos goes into detail on how to make the flywheels. When I built the engine a few years ago I use steel to make them like instructions call for. I had no problem making them with the little setup that I have.
                _____________________________________________

                I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                Oregon Coast

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by danlb View Post
                  I'd simply mount it normally, then do a facing operation from the inside to the outside.

                  Using an SCLCR boring bar will make it downright easy to do. If necessary I'd use a short, thin tool to make the cuts near the hub to provide clearance for the boring bar. Then it's a matter of plunge in .025 or so and back the cross-slide out till you reach the rim.

                  I've also done this with a simple 5/16 HSS tool.

                  Dan
                  What is an SCLCR boring bar?
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Lugnut--I'm working from the Philip Duclos book and he doesn't say anything about how to machine the flywheels, other than to use a 4 jaw chuck and cut as close to the chuck jaws as you can without hitting them.
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #11
                      I use a tool ,that looks like a threading too but ground to a 45؛angle instead of a 60؛. Just grind more clearance under it . Using that you hog out most of the material .Then finish the inter and outer corners with a right and left hand round nose tool . Are grind up a bit that looks like a little parting toll with a full radius on the end. Then you can finish both the outer and inter radius to the corners and skim the face all in one pass.
                      Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                      http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                      http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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                      • #12
                        Do all the cutting with one tool. Cut from near the hub and go towards the outside Cut to the desired depth and machine the inside of the rim with this tool. Reverse the spindle rotation and relocate the tool to the back side of the center line and proceed to go to the first cut. Turn the cross slide screw to finish the inner face and machine the OD of the hub section. Only one tool and one setting of the tool.

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                        • #13
                          An SCLCR tool is a right hand boring bar using a CCMT (diamond shaped) insert. Similar to the turning tool of the same designation; http://www.iscar.com/Ecat/familyhdr....lang=EN&type=1

                          The design works well for this use because the tip is narrow enough and protrudes beyond the holder enough to face or turn while in the normal position of perpendicular to the lathe axis. It also works when mounted parallel like a boring bar.

                          I can post pictures if you like. It will just take a few.
                          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                          • #14
                            Alright---I've looked at all the answers, both here and on the other forum I visit. I have a bunch of those cheap brazed carbide boring bars, and the smallest size is 0.290" wide at the tip. My evil looking parting tool that I have always used for this operation is .094" wide. Starting closest to the hub, I made 4 full depth plunges to the desired depth. Not all at one go---I plunged about .020", then moved out the width of the parting tool and repeated, jumping back and forth so that I wouldn't get the tool to deep into a single groove and have it bind and/or break. Now I can get the boring tool all the way down the slot to the desired depth. I have built adjustable carriage stops in both X and Y directions on my lathe, so I should now be able to use the boring tool held in the toolpost and make succesive passes from the slot near the hub towards the outer rim, coming towards me, until the entire recess is done. I will post a pic tomorrow.---Brian.
                            Brian Rupnow

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                            • #15
                              I guess I will have to pass on to you the way I was told how to machine flywheels. Chuck up your blank, I had to use my four jaw because it is larger. Next, just simply machine away every thing that is Not flywheel.
                              _____________________________________________

                              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                              Oregon Coast

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