Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Getting old, yes, machinery related!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Getting old, yes, machinery related!

    I must be getting old and my 4 jaw chuck is now a challenge for me to handle.

    A smaller one would be good but my lathe has D1-4 spindle and backplates cost as much as a new chuck and those that are available are much too big, of course I could buy a big one and cut it down.

    Three choices:
    1. Spend the money, buy back plate and turn it down to fit a manageable size 4 jaw.
    2. Figure out some procedure for handling the existing 4 jaw.
    3. Leave the 4 jaw on forever.

    "2" looks attractive, any ideas for handling a heavy chuck off and on?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    For option "2": build a wooden cradle to seat the current four jaw before affixing to the mandrel or as it comes off the mandrel; and use a simple ceiling or wall-hung pulley system to raise or lower the chuck off of or on to the cradle.

    Or For option "3": Use the current chuck, in place, to grip a small four-jaw or a small three-jaw.
    Last edited by sdgrand; 02-22-2013, 03:40 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a simple "U" shaped fixture that goes into the chuck jaws and connected to a trolley in a section of "Unistrut" attached to the ceiling with a four fall Nylon rope block. I use a wood cover for the ways. The rope is long enough to reach the floor to pick up the chuck. The chuck is a steel body four jaw and is heavy. Too much for this old man to lift.

      Comment


      • #4
        Some like these two (has to be some importer of cheep Chinese stuff somewhere in NZ)
        http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-hal...rane-1647.html
        http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-hal...nch-37555.html

        Another option is a simple chain host like so...
        http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-qua...ist-67144.html
        Attach to to either a trolley on an small i beam or a chuck of barn door track. The old "cannon ball" type track would work good.

        My thought is that if manhandling the chuck around is becoming a problem then soon you may have a similar issue with a large work piece too. Better to come up with a flexible solution.

        Comment


        • #5
          And if you're even more enthusiastic, check out Frank Ford's miniature chain hoist: http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Pr...minihoist.html

          Comment


          • #6
            This is a lift for a power wheel chair that is versatile and will lift 200 lbs. Found this at a yard sale.



            This is a winch from a 4 Wheeler converted to use strap rather than cable.



            This is a worm gear boat winch

            I have adapted a cordless drill to power it. The first two need a 12V car battery to power them.
            Right now I am using a motor hoist from Harbor Freight. I don't like it but it gets the job done.
            Byron Boucher
            Burnet, TX

            Comment


            • #7
              You guys aren't thinking right! Get another lathe so you have one with a 3 jaw & one with a 4 jaw. There problem solved!
              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
              country, in easy stages."
              ~ James Madison

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by flylo View Post
                You guys aren't thinking right! Get another lathe so you have one with a 3 jaw & one with a 4 jaw. There problem solved!
                You'd need three actually; 3 jaw, 4 jaw and one for collets.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ohio Mike View Post
                  You'd need three actually; 3 jaw, 4 jaw and one for collets.
                  Use the other lathe to power a winch to change the chuck, Then you only need two lathes.
                  Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not that old, or maybe its the Peter Pan syndrome, but I use my hydraulic lift table to raise & lower my 4 jaw especially since my back hurts due to my car wreck in Sept. I've also seriously considered building or buying something like the HR truck crane to my lift table.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Since I moved to the Bantam with 4-jaw chucks I've never used a three jaw on either of my lathes.

                      But also, on the Bantam I have D1-3, and I have Pratt-Burnerd lightweight chucks with integral D1-4 mounting - no backplates - so obviously a lot lighter than heavy duty chucks with backplates.

                      My 8 inch is a bit of a heft, but I could handle a bit heavier if needs be. But the 6 inch is a piece of cake.

                      Can you get the lightweight with no backplate for D1-4 too ?

                      Otherwise, 1 vote for leave the 4-jaw on all the time.

                      And if you want to leave a larger than usual chuck mounted, dedicate a cheap battery drill/driver to driving the jaws in and out, especially when you want to reverse them.
                      Richard

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is 2013. Don't you have a robot for such things?
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My lathe came with a back plate mount chuck and a few years back I picked up a new/second hand direct mount chuck and it's a lot lighter.

                          I am only 46 but have a broken disk in my neck so I can't go lifting heavy stuff, my fix was a home made jib crane. It reaches both the lathe and the mill





                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dr Stan View Post
                            I'm not that old, or maybe its the Peter Pan syndrome, but I use my hydraulic lift table to raise & lower my 4 jaw especially since my back hurts due to my car wreck in Sept. I've also seriously considered building or buying something like the HR truck crane to my lift table.
                            Here is the definition of the Peter Pan syndrome:

                            In psychology, Peter Pan Syndrome refers to younger generations' unwillingness to grow up and their corresponding immature behaviors. This syndrome is most prevalent in the late 80s and 90s generation where the development of a sense of responsibility does not occur nearly as early as it used to. Possibly contributing factors might include over-protectiveness of modern parents, rising costs of living, and increased difficulty in finding satisfactory partners.

                            The phenomenon was based on Peter Pan, a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie who never ages and acts with carelessness and fearlessly cocky behaviors. This syndrome is more common in boys[1][2][3] than in girls, who learn responsibility earlier as they become aware of the concept of family, childbirth etc.
                            from:

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_pan_syndrome

                            It seems that the problem here is older (not younger) men who will not face facts and reality and grow up and realise that if life (and fate) have not caught up with them it is likely to be breathing down their necks.

                            Perhaps there are more on the "down hill run" than many realise or will admit and face up to.

                            I suspect that some of those bigger machines, accessories and tools are going to be more of a burden as time and life march on.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              DavoJ , why do you lift with your neck? No wonder you hurt it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X