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100 year old shop still in use

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  • 100 year old shop still in use

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...v=BckZ4i1BzF0#!

  • #2
    John isnt 100 quite yet
    Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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    • #3
      Thanks really enjoyed that, few more like that and the world would be a better place.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the link.
        Nice to see family-run shops still cranking out parts.

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        • #5
          I related to the young lad when remembering my early years of shop work.
          John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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          • #6
            We have a couple of shop like that around here, one of them only has one piece of non-belt drive machinery, Sir John's favorite a Bridgeport mill. Shop's like that fill a niche for work types that more "modern" shops don't want to deal with.
            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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            • #7
              That drill press ... Keith Fenner on youtube has one of those. All drill presses I've seen look like toys compared to that one.

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              • #8
                Here's one that still in use: http://www.oldengine.org/members/levans/lineshaft/

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                • #9
                  That kind of thing I do enjoy. Any more old shops but didn't he say 1938 so not quite a tom yet.Beautiful way of life I like to see families come together like this with each other having full respect for the other.Thats not so easy to find these days thanks for showing. Alistair
                  Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                  • #10
                    Great pics guys , thanks for posting these!! Always an interesting tour!!

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                    • #11
                      It's all nice and good about the family business. Everyone should have respect for each other like that.

                      Still, I don't understand why they are still using methods and tooling from pre-WWII. Perhaps they're in an area where there is never going to be a guy down the road who opens a shop, does things faster and cheaper and puts them out of business. That shouldn't stop them from investing in at least some modern methods that would put more money in their pockets and give them more available time. Industry is no place for nostalgia, that's what museums are for.

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                      • #12
                        Pixman,
                        It looks like they do alot of oilfield repairs, and 'one-offs' ... hence the 3-man shop.
                        They probably have no need for CNC, or big production machines, or even tight-tolerance work.
                        That shop has been around awhile so they probably have no bills, other than electric.
                        It looks like they can get by happily with a couple hundred bucks worth of work every week.
                        Just my observation.

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                        • #13
                          True, though they'd get a lot of the turning jobs done far more efficiently with carbide insert tooling and more powerful and speedier direct driven machines. Milling with carbide insert face mills instead of a shaper gets flat surfaces 10x faster, and so much more. I agree that manual machines are better for the one-off parts, but they really should get newer machines with power and speed before the guy down the road does.

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                          • #14
                            Sheeiit boy, I know where I be stoppin' this spring when I go through Texas. I'll have to drop down off I-40 to go to Abilene but that can be done.
                            It's only ink and paper

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PixMan View Post
                              True, though they'd get a lot of the turning jobs done far more efficiently with carbide insert tooling and more powerful and speedier direct driven machines. Milling with carbide insert face mills instead of a shaper gets flat surfaces 10x faster, and so much more. I agree that manual machines are better for the one-off parts, but they really should get newer machines with power and speed before the guy down the road does.
                              Classic case of production shop vs jobber shop philosophy.

                              In a jobber shop like theirs, a machine can sit months between jobs. How do you justify new machines when the job frequency is that low? These guys have time to sit and drink soda pop at 9:30 every morning - high productivity rate is obviously not the highest priority. In a maintenance shop/jobber shop creativity and versatility are far more important than parts per hour. Set up time for a job (from empty 3 jaw and tool holder) is similar whether on a CNC
                              lathe or a century old belt driven behemoth.

                              As far as carbide tooling, in an oilfield shop, the materials change almost as frequently as the parts do from common A36 structural to 4340. By the time they figure out which $10 insert is best, the job is long over and out the door and the material has changed again.

                              Again in an oilfield maintenance/repair shop, the work pieces can vary from 1" or less OD to 11" OD bar stock and 20" flat flanges. HSS is far more economical and better suited....
                              Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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