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  • Thinking Of Down Sizing

    I'm at that point in life where the lathe and mill I have are far more machine that I truly need. That having been said, I'd appreciated thoughts on "table" top lathes and mills that I could investigate. My Bride said that if I died and left her with all the stuff I have in my shop (her double car garage) that she'll kill me again.

    Thanks in advance.
    John B

  • #2
    Originally posted by jr45acp View Post
    I'm at that point in life where the lathe and mill I have are far more machine that I truly need. That having been said, I'd appreciated thoughts on "table" top lathes and mills that I could investigate. My Bride said that if I died and left her with all the stuff I have in my shop (her double car garage) that she'll kill me again.

    Thanks in advance.
    Why rid yourself of the things you enjoy? Instead of following in the footsteps of BinMasterTiffie, make a documented plan to orderly find homes or sell your machines and tooling after you "turn out the lights for the last time"? Put it all in writing, including an inventory and estimated value.

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    • #3
      Keep it but either have it arranged with a friend to sell it on Ebay & set a prcentage for his trouble, or have it arranged with an auctioeer to do it. JMHO
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rosco-P View Post
        Why rid yourself of the things you enjoy? .
        100% agree. Unless you have to move or something most will I think say the same thing. Get and try a desktop then determine if you need the and mill . BMT's case is maybe a little different assuming you actually use the stuff

        as for burdon on the wife, maybe a little but should be very little, I like the prearrangement with a friend. otoh any garage could be emptied almost over night if what she wants is no hassle/quick. I've worked so hard to assembly my collection, I'd rather it was given away after i was gone than have to go without it so the garage was clean :P
        .

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        • #5
          As soon as you sell it, you'll regret it.

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          • #6
            Don't die before her.

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            • #7
              John,

              Not knowing your circumstances, can only offer suggestions.
              If this is a temporary thing that you will sorely miss latter consider just how hard it was to get these machines and hard hard it will be to replace them.

              I have both large and small. Bridgeport size mill and 12x36 lathe plus welders, saws, and most of the common metal shop tools. I also have Sherline mill, lathe and rotary table.
              Recently needed to make a bolt 1 3/16 x 20 thread about 3 inches long 1 .5 hex head. This could be made on Sherline, but setup would be time consuming compared to chucking stock in the larger lathe.
              Turning to size threading then chucking in large rotary table. Cutting the hex with large mill. This project took 1.5 -2 hours. On the Sherline machines it would have taken over 8 hours. The sherline's are great for small things usually get them out of the storage cabinet and set on mill table.

              To turn the front part of a 45acp barrel on a sherline you would need to use 4 jaw chuck and a steady rest. Making a firing pin for same could be done with 3 jaw and no steady.
              I find that tool sharpness and setting height are very critical on the lathe and tool sharpness and depth of cut and feed are very important on the mill.

              Bob

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              • #8
                John;

                What do you want to do in your workshop?

                I'd have no problem with one of my little Emco Compact-8 lathes, and my small CNC milling machine for the kinds of models I want to continue building.

                Focusing is a problem; but sometimes having less is actually more. Things I don't use in a decade get given away or sold cheaply, and the storage space used for something more important.

                Just decide what you want to do, and what you need to do it with. For those odd occasions when you might need larger tooling, either take some of the proceeds from the sale and *pay* someone to do it (or, time in their workshop).

                Kozo Hiraoka, master live steam designer and builder, had a workshop 8 feet x 8 feet in the corner of the living room apartment, and he turned out incredible stuff.

                Just my 0.02c, whatever you choose to do will be the right decision.

                Another JohnS.

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                • #9
                  My wife asked a similar question. Told her to simply call and auctioneer and let them take care of it.

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                  • #10
                    Here is the OP:

                    Originally posted by jr45acp View Post
                    I'm at that point in life where the lathe and mill I have are far more machine that I truly need. That having been said, I'd appreciated thoughts on "table" top lathes and mills that I could investigate. My Bride said that if I died and left her with all the stuff I have in my shop (her double car garage) that she'll kill me again.

                    Thanks in advance.
                    A sensible suggestion from Dr. Stan:

                    Originally posted by Dr Stan View Post
                    My wife asked a similar question. Told her to simply call and auctioneer and let them take care of it.
                    There are two somewhat related posts here as regards "down sizing" a shop and/or disposing of what may really be machines and tools that the owner has decided are surplus to his known and anticipated requirements.

                    I take it from the tone of the OP that he has made up his mind and any suggestions (or stronger) to keep them are futile in which case retaining any that he decides to dispose of is finalised and all he wants/needs is advice on table/bench-top lathes and mills as by inference he has decided that that is all he needs for his known and anticipated purposes.

                    It would seem that good manners and protocol would be to desist from trying to talk him into keeping what he has decided to dispose of and to focus on the "table-top" machines aspect of his request.

                    Stan's suggestion re the Auctioneer may be a good neat and tidy solution where the ultimate end of the machines will be decided by a future owner/buyer (ie re-use, recondition, re-sell or sell to scrap) at an unconditional sale/auction.

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                    • #11
                      You can auction it off in a day. The auctioneer will bring some strong high school kids to haul it out without any thought to what it is or what goes with what!

                      Nobody will care in your family what it brings--they don't know want it or what anything is. If money is a factor, price everything with what you think it is worth before you get too old to remember. Still it is only worth what someone will pay!

                      My wife will have a big smile on her face when my stuff all disappears from the basement and the garage.. No more noise, dust or smell!

                      Of course, a lot of stuff will stay broken.

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                      • #12
                        He who dies with the most toys wins.

                        frankie

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jr45acp View Post
                          I'm at that point in life where the lathe and mill I have are far more machine that I truly need. That having been said, I'd appreciated thoughts on "table" top lathes and mills that I could investigate. My Bride said that if I died and left her with all the stuff I have in my shop (her double car garage) that she'll kill me again.

                          Thanks in advance.
                          As with any tool, the basic answer is "it depends on what you want to do"

                          Without knowing that, I'll talk about my own experience...

                          About a year ago I bought a grizzly mini mill and lathe (7x14, iirc)
                          I barely know how to spell "machining" so I figured they'd be fun to play with, learn the basics of the machines, etc. I've spent a lot of time cleaning and adjusting the machines. But I now know them fairly well, inside and out. As to making stuff, I've made a few things, nothing overly precise right now ... But I'm learning. I feel the machines are well within my comfort zone. As I've got my machines, I would not want to make anything too precise ... Like gun parts (which from your name, you might be interested in). But I've read that with a lot of work, they can be made as good as just about anything else you'd get. Ymmv.

                          Long story short, those machines seem to be fine for my level of skill and it seems that they can be brought up to more skill, as needed

                          Frank

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                          • #14
                            This is where Ebay is your friend.
                            Basically Ebay now sets prices, I recently picked an old Drummond lathe up from the scrap yard for £10 as Gary in the yard just wasn't bothered and was going to scrap it.
                            I thought it was probably worth £120 but looking on Ebay - completed listings, and the going price was about £70.

                            So stuck it on at £60 and it sold for £67.
                            Just got rid of a couple of surplus compressors, again looked on Ebay, got a price fixed in my mind and listed them and they sold for roughly the Ebay price.

                            You don't need values as what you think it's worth possibly isn't current market value.

                            All too often I have been to estate sales where hubby has told the wife she's sitting on a fortune just to justify his hobby, when the reality is she sitting on a pile of junk, in many cases where the machines are big, old or hard to remove it's actually negative equity.

                            Don't know about over in the US but an auctioneer over here is not interested unless you have room to hold the auction on site with room for 50+ people under cover, enough lots for a full day or you pay to ship it to their auction rooms.

                            Best thing is to talk it over with your other half so she knows what is what, take photo's and put a description to them, forget the prices because all she will have to do is search on Ebay under the description, compare it to the photo and list it for the same price.
                            .

                            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                            • #15
                              You can always down size the Bride but that is usally more expensive

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