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_ 15/16 Hole saw for bronze ?

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  • _ 15/16 Hole saw for bronze ?

    Would you use (and what type) hole saw with a lathe cutting bronze ?
    I might buy some bronze (932) 1-1/4 bar stock to create some bushings, 1-1/4 OD x 1 ID x 1 long.

    Instead of drilling and boring, use a 15/16 whole saw (in the tail stock) to rough out the bushing ID, finish the OD, cut-off and now have a bushing with a rough ID and also a small slug (roughly 3/4-7/8 OD) for some other use (yup... im cheap and bronze is not ).

    I might just buy tubing, but the above idea popped into my head and thought i would ask.

    Any opinions ?
    ~ What was once an Opinion, became a Fact, to be later proven Wrong ~
    http://site.thisisjusthowidoit.com
    https://www.youtube.com/user/thisisjusthowidoit

  • #2
    Use a 15/16 holesaw in your lathe. No need for the pilot drill.

    Starret are good
    "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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    • #3
      I've found that hole saws tend to wobble a bit, so the 15/16" holesaw may cut oversize. Holesaws are definitely not high-precision. I'd try a test cut in an aluminum bar or something before committing to the bronze. You may need to experiment with bending (slightly) the edge of the arbor mounting hole to try to get it running more truly. Or you may luck out with a holesaw with minimal wobble.
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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      • #4
        The main shortcoming of using holesaws is the rigidity and fit of the arbor. For everday use in wood the factory offerings work ok. For use in the mill particularly in scarfing pipe with the attendant unbalanced load I made some R8 arbors shown here.

        This works much better.
        For use in the lathe I would suggest an appropiate Tail stock arbor or an ER 40 chuck in the tailstock to hold the hole saw. Sometime you have to try something to determine wheather it is a good idea or not. I think you will find that drilling and boring is the better way to go.
        Byron Boucher
        Burnet, TX

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        • #5
          You are going to experience great tedium in chip/swarf clearing from the very deep hole.

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          • #6
            It looks like you can buy premade bushings cheaper than you can get the material for. Unless you need them undersize of the 1", then the price starts to equal out.

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            • #7
              A 15/16 rotabroach would probably be a lot better choice than a holesaw.

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              • #8
                Buy the tubing. Money is one thing. Time and aggravation is something else entirely
                Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                • #9
                  Hey, I'm a gluten for punishment and cheap... but wouldn't consider this...

                  That size in 13" lengths is pretty much stock, is frequently on sale...finished bushings that size are $ 5 or so on average

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
                    Hey, I'm a gluten for punishment and cheap... but wouldn't consider this...

                    That size in 13" lengths is pretty much stock, is frequently on sale...finished bushings that size are $ 5 or so on average
                    From McMaster finished bushings are under $4. 13" length is over $60. Unless you have the stock on hand, I don't see the point in trying to make them.

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                    • #11
                      I'd think surely you can find cored bronze stock, and much cheaper than solid to be wasted away creating the desired bore..

                      as they say,Google is your friend:
                      http://www.atlasbronze.com/Cored_Bar...eet_s/1834.htm
                      http://www.sequoia-brass-copper.com/store/841cored.html
                      http://www.intechbearing.com/Bronze-Bar-93600.html

                      ...just to list a few
                      Last edited by lynnl; 03-01-2013, 06:15 PM.

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