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  • machining a notch

    Crude drawing of a piece of channel, into which I need to machine a nice clean notch as shown.



    I'm trying to think of the best way to hold this. These are 1 inch wide, about half inch high, about 4 inches long, 1/8 wall thickness.

    I can rough them out on the bandsaw, but then need to hold them at 45 to clean up the notch. I have an angle vise, but it doesn't angle in the right way to do this job. Sure would be nice to be able to angle a vise the other way-

    Maybe I'm just missing something-

    There will be two holes in the 1 inch wide part on each side of the notch. All I can think of is to use those holes to screw each piece in turn onto an angled piece that I'd have to make up as a mount.
    Last edited by darryl; 03-07-2013, 05:03 AM.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    What is the accuracy required? If you are welding something to it, then just draw the lines and have at it with a hacksaw.
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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    • #3
      A little bit more information might help , but either cut it with a saw or plasma , oxy and then grind to smooth.
      Michael

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      • #4
        No welding- two of these get sandwiched together and fit over a square bar as a handle. They get screwed together to pinch the bar, and should come close to touching, but not quite. What will be important is to have the groove straight across- if they are angled slightly they won't line up when put together. There is a bit of precision involved to get there.

        I had another look at my angle vise and saw the way to set it up. I just didn't see it before- I was looking at angle blocks, fixtures, jigs- then finally I clued in. Duh

        Of course the vise jaws are only parallel to the table when the vise is in the down position. Get it up to 45 and one side is low by 12 thou. I shimmed it and now it's close- I hope it doesn't skid on me.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          OK ,that should work just take it slowly and safely.
          Michael

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          • #6
            The thing I don't like about this setup is that the forces are going to be parallel to the vise jaws, which means I risk the workpiece tipping to the side. I'll have to make it very tight and take light cuts. Maybe I should run a dado in a piece of maple or something to nest the parts into, and keep that down to the bottom of the jaws. That would prevent tipping anyway.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              Originally posted by darryl View Post
              There is a bit of precision involved to get there.
              1 meter? 0.001 mm?
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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              • #8
                How many of these to you have to make? If only a few, rough on the bandsaw and file. Old school and effective.

                bob

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rowbare View Post
                  How many of these to you have to make? If only a few, rough on the bandsaw and file. Old school and effective.

                  bob
                  thats what i'd be thinking. If you to machine it, tilt the mill head...could some chatter etc as someone suggested, but I'd guess mill and miller would survive
                  .

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                  • #10
                    Does your mill head rotate? If so then I would fill the middle with wood and put wood on the outside on both sides. Clamp it to the table. Then take a large diameter endmill and cut that sucker in one pass. But don't listen to me because I am a beginner.
                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                    • #11
                      Use the holes to screw the piece to a block ( wood, metal, what ever) I would remove the majority of the metal with a saw. Then clamp the block in the vice at a 45° use the side and bottom of a milling cutter to true up making the cut using the Y axis.
                      Byron Boucher
                      Burnet, TX

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                      • #12
                        find a chunk(s) of wood or metal just thick enough to fill the inside gap (on both sides of the V), then c-clamp it to the outside. That should fix the chatter problem. Now mount this piece horizontally in the vise. Tilt your mill's head over 45 degrees.

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                        • #13
                          rough it with saw / angle grinder then clean up with chamfer mill (spot drill? those endmills with a pointed 90*
                          -- 45* per side.. i use them to chamfer and cut small V grooves).

                          Not sure how big they make them.
                          Or what size your V is.

                          But just a thought.

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                          • #14
                            What material? (Have I missed something?) If it is AL, you could use woodworking carbide tipped blade in a table saw or radial arm saw.
                            Gary


                            Appearance is Everything...

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                            • #15
                              Cut each piece of channel a bit long. Weld stout flat bar at a 45 to each end so they meet at a right angle. Weld up that angle too. Now clamp the piece on one of your 45 flat bar pieces so the channel is held up at 45 degrees. Check its alignment with a protractor and tap it in as necessary then clamp tight and machine.

                              Or make each piece out of two halves of channel each cut at 45. Clamp both to a strongback and weld from the back side. This will leave your open 90 degree gap. It's easy to bevel pieces on a horizontal cutoff bandsaw.

                              Or just use rectangular tube with a square hole cut in it and filed. Slit it along its length partway so it will clamp on your square bar like a collet. Or use a round handle and just drill a rectangular tube to fit, again slitting/clamping.

                              metalmagpie

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