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Todays lesson: Aluminum does not raise when you punch it.

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  • Todays lesson: Aluminum does not raise when you punch it.

    Todays lesson was that while center punching aluminum to 'raise' the surface is.. It does not raise, at least not on the thin metal I was hammering on

    Had some paper under the back of it to protect the face, and all It did was end up with mild dents on that side. theres absolulte no metal raised around the punch marks.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

  • #2
    The problem is the material thickness, not the material itself.
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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    • #3
      The material needs to go somewhere. If the piece is thin, the material will displace out the other side. If the material has enough support under the punch mark, the material will displace towards the surface, as that is the path of least resistance.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lbhsbz View Post
        The material needs to go somewhere. If the piece is thin, the material will displace out the other side. If the material has enough support under the punch mark, the material will displace towards the surface, as that is the path of least resistance.
        Yep - same thing will happen if you center punch thin gauge steel. Dents on the back and no raising of the surface.

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        • #5
          following on isbiz??????, how about on steel plate? MY ???, Wayne.

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          • #6
            Hmm. Thin luminum desn't rise when punched. Not enough yeast? Maybe thin alum is more like a tortilla?

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            • #7
              How is your center punch ground? When sharpening a center punch, many people hold the point of the punch facing (relatively) parallel to the rotation of the wheel and rotate the punch. This produces radial ridges around the punch that tends to pull the metal down during the punching operation. If you chuck your punch in a drill motor to rotate it while grinding and hold the punch tangental to the wheel, you end up with lineal grinding marks running out from the point that slide past the metal rather than engaging it.

              I believe that I saw this in one of the Bedside Readers.
              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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