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Deburring and countersinking

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  • Deburring and countersinking

    After making a series of razor-sharp holes lately, and generally getting dubious results when breaking the edges with larger drills, I decided to look at deburring tools.

    I found deburring and chamfering tools, the only obvious difference being the included angle.

    My options are 60, 82, 90, 100, and 120 degrees of 'included angle' which seems to be ... I have no idea. My mental model just collapsed.

    What is the most useful included angle? My google-fu is weak today.

    My primary goal is to debur. But if I could countersink with the same tool that would be a plus.

  • #2
    A lot of the deburring tools that fit in the mill or drill, will kick up their own burr.

    Get a hand-held deburring tool and you will do better. This link may work, I don't recall if mcmaster blocks direct linking.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#bur-tools/=lth5t3
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      Tony, It depends on what flat head screws you use
      You will find that American standards are 82 degrees for flat head machine screws, and metric standards are 90 degrees.
      Some wood screws are 100 degrees as I recall, but can't be sure
      The 60 degree countersink is for preparing a hole for use in a lathe center
      Rich

      PS I agree with JT on using a hand held deburring tool
      They have two types generally that you want to look at
      one for round holes and one for straight stock beburring
      Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 03-10-2013, 12:52 PM.

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      • #4
        The 100 degree ones are for rivets in sheetmetal (think aircraft).

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        • #5
          I normally just use the "big drill bit". But when looks are needed I have a couple things I use:

          This:


          Or this for super nice round top holes:
          Andy

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          • #6
            an 82 degree countersink in a hand drill has always worked for me.
            Or use a Rout-a-burr

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            • #7
              90 degree counter sinker in a hand drill, haven't found a better. 90 degrees because it breaks the sharp corner in half (and also because counter sink screws have a 90 degree head).
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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              • #8
                I use a 82 degree single flute countersink tool by hand. Because the screws here are 82 degrees.

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                • #9
                  I use the 0 flute counter sinks for deburing holes as well as for countersinking them. They cut smoothly and simply do not chatter. Normally they do ont raise an edge.

                  http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/co...ink_Weldon.jpg

                  http://www.mcmaster.com/#countersinks/=ltr37q

                  They must be properly sharpened and I have had a bad one or two so don't buy cheap ones.
                  Paul A.

                  Make it fit.
                  You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                    90 degree counter sinker in a hand drill, haven't found a better. 90 degrees because it breaks the sharp corner in half (and also because counter sink screws have a 90 degree head).
                    Metric ones do. English system uses 82 degrees.
                    It depends upon the purpose of the countersink/edge break. If the hole is to be tapped then 120 guides the tap nicely. For just an edge break, 90 is good. Even better to do what the print says.

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                    • #11
                      A couple I've been real happy with...

                      if by hand, lots of times I just want to knock the burr off, does it real fast:

                      SHAVIV 151-90094 Mango II Set M With Mango II Handle - $17.71
                      http://www.amazon.com/SHAVIV-151-900.../dp/B003JY7MDW



                      Other stuff from SHAVIV at Amazon:
                      http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bl_sr_in...&node=16310091


                      if tool mounted:

                      Magafor 414 Series Cobalt Steel Single-End Countersink, Uncoated (Bright) Finish, Zero Flute, 82 Degrees, Round Shank
                      http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007PKO75W

                      Same design but not by Weldon like Paul just linked to, love the finish I get from using it though...

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                      • #12
                        I'm with Paul on this ... For deburing I wouldn't use anything else!

                        Paul

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                        • #13
                          I have a deburring tool I love, same brand as the one above. Came with something like six all-purpose bits, I've had it for three or four years and the only reason I ever replaced one is because I used it on a rough work-hardened stainless piece. This second blade is holding up well.
                          Never manage to get a nice smooth chamfer with it, though.
                          I have a 6-flute countersink I love for big screws, but it doesn't get used all that much. The great thing about being in the US is that an 82-degree countersink works for both 82-degree and 90-degree tapers. Just make sure that it's not terribly load-bearing, for the 90's; they will contacts a ring around the head of the screw instead of the entire surface.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tdmidget View Post
                            Metric ones do. English system uses 82 degrees.
                            It depends upon the purpose of the countersink/edge break. If the hole is to be tapped then 120 guides the tap nicely. For just an edge break, 90 is good. Even better to do what the print says.
                            The U.S. system uses 82 degrees. If you translated from English to Latin , Hungarian or Urdu, it would still be 82 degrees.

                            Metric, BSW and BSF use 90 degrees.

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                            • #15
                              I like to use a 90d angle because it's good for thread starts too. The ones with one big hole are the smoothest I've used.

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