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Toolpost grinder questions

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    My impression from what I have seen of those particular units is that they looked very "un-handy"..... and apparently I wasn't far off the mark.

    In any case, a decent grinder is a good item for many sorts of work, and also a great way to spread abrasive grit all over the lathe.... I've used them, but don't like it much from that aspect.

    As for their effectiveness, a good TP grinder is excellent for getting a good finish and fine control of stock removal. That is, if you can stand the mess, preparing for it, and cleaning up after. If you have a "beater" lathe that can be dedicated to grinding, or a proper cylindrical grinder, or tool and cutter grinder, it's a great way to do certain parts.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    I'm looking at this wondering if you could turn the base 90 degrees so it's facing backwards, then mount it to an angle plate, thereby getting it low enough to sit on the compound. You would probably have to cut off the front foot too. Then you would be able to do all the angles you want with no restrictions. Maybe that would work, maybe not.

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  • Stepside
    replied
    Brian

    I have one like in the picture. It is okay at best (or I wasn't in the mood to fuss with it) I would suspect you could do what you have described with a "pencil grinder" held in a block on your compound. This would give you the angle capabilities you are looking for as well as a finishing tool when removed from the block. You want to mount the grinder so the part are "fighting" each other not so they are "helping" each other.

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  • brian Rupnow
    started a topic Toolpost grinder questions

    Toolpost grinder questions

    I am considering buying a toolpost grinder for my lathe from Little Machine Shop.
    http://littlemachineshop.com/product...2001&category=
    I simply don't have the ability to turn small precision parts like needle valves for miniature carburetors on my 10" x 18" lathe. Once I get below about 3/32" diameter stock, the material just flexes away from even my sharpest HSS tooling. I am assuming that with a toolpost grinder like the one shown in the picture and link, that I could grind these small items to the required taper. I would be using this for unhardened mild cold rolled steel. I would also use it to grind the sealing faces on miniature valves like the ones on the small i.c. engines I build. I don't know the first thing about toolpost grinders, but for $150 I am willing to learn, especially if I can use one to make these small parts that I have no other good way of making. The one in the picture is 2" from the center of the grinding wheel to the base, and they suggest removing the compound rest and bolting it directly to the cross slide table. My lathe measures about 3" from the center of the chuck to the top of the cross slide table, so I realize I would have to machine an adapter plate. Of course, this would leave me with no way to set up angles to grind tapers, so I would probably have to have an adapter plate with drilled and tapped holes at whatever angles I would most commonly wish to grind on tapered needle valves. Any insight that you can give me in respect to what i want to do would be much appreciated.-----Brian
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