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can I cut 2" round cold rolled steel with an abrasive chop saw?

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  • #16
    I have a carbide tipped saw on a chop saw. It is made for a carbide tipped blade. It cuts great. Much faster and the cut is cleaner than my bandsaw. I have a really good bandsaw not a Horror Freight type. One will destroy a blade if it is not used with care. It is loud when it cuts and hearing protection is a must.

    As to a band saw cutting better than a cold saw I don't know if I would agree with that statement. It depends on the bandsaw and the cold saw. If you compare an industrial cold saw to a industrial bandsaw I think you will definitely get at least as good a cut with the cold saw. Lets compare apples to apples!
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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    • #17
      ++ on buy a 4x6 bandsaw.
      Iv cut through 2" stock in just a few minutes. So boring (Good thing). just stand there and dribble some oil on the cut every couple seconds and watch the nice tidy pile of chips behind the work grow.

      Not much to go wrong, makes a nice straight clean cut, no mess, no fuss, quiet, No 130db deathwail. Much faster then abrasives and much smaller kerf.

      The only thing abrasive saws are good for is stuff too hard or big to bandsaw!
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #18
        Thanks for all the replies. I will try my bandsaw and slow it down, I have a motor speed controller that works on it.

        I was thinking the chop saw because I can get a 14" one for $60. I'm a computer programmer by trade (if you can call it that) and am just playing around in my shop building some parts for a friends robots so spending $300+ is not an option.

        Schor
        Steve

        My youtube:
        http://www.youtube.com/MyShopNotes

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        • #19
          Originally posted by schor View Post
          Thanks for all the replies. I will try my bandsaw and slow it down, I have a motor speed controller that works on it.

          I was thinking the chop saw because I can get a 14" one for $60. I'm a computer programmer by trade (if you can call it that) and am just playing around in my shop building some parts for a friends robots so spending $300+ is not an option.

          Schor

          From your perspective, anything is better than nothing. I would (and do) have a chop saw, and it does work. It is loud and dirty and kind of scary at times, but it will make two shorter pieces out of one longer one. Check the price of blades before you spring for the saw. They can get pricey for a good one, and they can wear out rather quickly too.

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          • #20
            +1 on the porta-band, even the H-F version. I have a Kalamazoo portable chop saw, and I'll only use it outdoors because of the sparks , noise, mess, ect..

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            • #21
              Originally posted by schor View Post
              I'm a computer programmer by trade (if you can call it that) and am just playing around in my shop

              so are most of us.....from an avoiding aquiring stuff perspective, all I can say is it doesn't end well
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #22
                Abraisive chop saws are great for cutting rusty pipe or flatbar, angle etc, anything that is got rust on it.

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                • #23
                  I've cut heavy bar stock with my abrasive saw but as previously stated, lots of sparks and dirty, best done outdoors. One problem I encountered while cutting heavy material was the abrasive blade glazing and cutting slowing to a crawl. I don't really know how to overcome that issue, perhaps different blades. I used a diamond grinding wheel sharpener on the edge of the abrasive blade to remove the glazed surface so cutting could continue. Thin materials and materials with edges don't seem to have the glazing issue, perhaps they wear the blade faster.

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                  • #24
                    I have bought a 4 by 6 bandsaw used for $100--it needed a little TLC but it is great for cutting metal. You can set it up the cut and work on something else and it (normally) shuts off when it is done. Check craigslist in your area. I have three different bandsaws but if I had to have one it would be a 4 by 6".

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                    • #25
                      I bet my bandsaw is my most used big tool in the shop. It certainly has saved me the most time and effort compared to my prior use of a hacksaw or a chopsaw. Although you stated it wasn't in the budget you also said something about doing robot projects for friends. Get in the habit of charging them a little something per cut or job. Even if is a nickel a cut. It'll add up, you won't feel abused, the bandsaw will get paid for, you'll realize it was actually a great investment. My 9 cents worth.

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                      • #26
                        As others have said the abrasive saw is great for thin section stuff, ie angles, flat, tube, RHS but not good for solids. 32mm round is the largest I can get through in one pass, anything bigger and the round needs to be part cut, turn 90° then finish cut.

                        Messy noisy buggers as well, make sure you point the sparks and grit outside.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by cuemaker View Post



                          I bought one of these off Craigslist for $150....Best damn purchase period. Mine is not as picutred, I got a DeWalt with Multiple speeds, extra deep.

                          But damn...it has been the most handy thing
                          I have no idea how I ever survived before I bought one!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by schor View Post
                            just playing around in my shop building some parts for a friends robots so spending $300+ is not an option.

                            Schor
                            Give your friend a hacksaw. You will see how interested he is in the project then.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                            • #29
                              Forget the abrasive chop saw for solids that big. BTDT. Get a decent 'portaband' bandsaw as previously suggested. Much more versatile. Use bimetal blades too.

                              Give the long chunk to your friend and tell him to bring it back in the shorter chunks you need.
                              If under 2' or so you could just buy them precut from one of the online metal dealers. Possibly a place like Speedy Metals.

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                              • #30
                                Not quite so gentle, so be warned.

                                Cut two inch steel round with an abrasive blade?

                                Only on two days of the year, 1/1 and 7/4 (in US).

                                Can you say "fireworks show"? Can I watch?


                                Seriously, get a metal cutting band saw. Even the little old 4x6s will do a good, if somewhat slow, job of it. Larger band saws will do it quicker. And you can start it and do something else while it cuts. They have auto shut off. But do keep an eye on it in case the blade breaks.



                                Originally posted by schor View Post
                                I am totally new to metalworking and this is my first post here so please be gentle.

                                I have some 2" cold rolled steel round stock that I want to machine on my lathe, but I want to cut it up into smaller lengths.

                                I am considering purchasing an abrasive chop saw and wondering if its the right tool. Or do I need to use a cold saw?

                                I also have a small woodworking bandsaw that I could put a metal cutting blade in, but somehow I don't think that's going to work, max blade width for my bandsaw is 3/8".

                                Thanks for any replies.

                                Schor
                                Paul A.
                                SE Texas

                                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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