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  • #16
    Originally posted by radkins View Post
    I think after reading up on these things I am having second thoughts about using one mainly due to the problem of fogging up the shop.
    I had the same problem until I found the units made by Hench. They work with as little as 2-5 psi. I recommend them highly.

    Usual "no affiliation" disclaimer.

    http://www.fogbuster.com/

    Dave

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    • #17
      What is the difference between Hench and Bjur? I still maintain these are 10 X better than the venturi type that atomize the coolant. As for smoke/fog in the shop if you put oil on metal that is above 400°F you are going to get smoke. How much is just determined by how much and how hot. Breathing smoke and breathing cool mist are much different for me.
      Byron Boucher
      Burnet, TX

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Boucher View Post
        What is the difference between Hench and Bjur? I still maintain these are 10 X better than the venturi type that atomize the coolant.
        Probably the major difference is that there is no "fine atomizing" of the liquid if the Hench unit is adjusted properly.

        As I said, they will operate on as little as 2-5 psi air pressure so the great majority of liquid ends up deposited on the surfaces it is aimed at. Even at this low pressure it seems to penetrate the cutting zone effectively and provide cooling and lubrication.

        The major drawback to this system may be that the nozzle works best when positioned close to the cutting zone, making it vulnerable to long, stringy chips, as when using a twist drill.

        Just explaining my experience, YMMV.

        Dave

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        • #19
          Originally posted by becksmachine View Post
          Probably the major difference is that there is no "fine atomizing" of the liquid if the Hench unit is adjusted properly.

          As I said, they will operate on as little as 2-5 psi air pressure so the great majority of liquid ends up deposited on the surfaces it is aimed at. Even at this low pressure it seems to penetrate the cutting zone effectively and provide cooling and lubrication.

          The major drawback to this system may be that the nozzle works best when positioned close to the cutting zone, making it vulnerable to long, stringy chips, as when using a twist drill.

          Just explaining my experience, YMMV.

          Dave
          Isn't this a CNC group? Use a peck or chip break cycle when drilling. Long stringy chips are hazardous even without the coolant nozzle.

          Gary H. Lucas

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