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A small geared(?) motor

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  • A small geared(?) motor

    My wife is a ninja wool processor. She spins, knits, cards, etc.

    Her carder is machine designed to blend different wools. It's hand-cranked. We're both believers in having good/appropriate equipment, so she wants a motorized version.

    This is representative, and maybe the exact model she she has.

    The motorized "wide" version is something like $2,100. Maybe not bad for what is basically an industrial machine that will last decades. But it's still a lot of money for an oak box, two custom drums, and a motor.

    These things run at a low RPM, say, under 100 rpm, and need to be variable speed. In some cases it would barely be turning. What type of motor would be suitable for this? Any tiny DC geared motor?

  • #2
    Can you get more specs? HP RPM Etc. I have some new gear reduction motors I believe in 1/8 & 1/4 HP. These are not variable speed but maybe a $15 HF router speed controller will work. Not trying to sell just trying to help.
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

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    • #3
      Working on more specs now. HP would be way low. We're talking about wrapping a few handfuls of loose wool around a drum. 1/8 HP would probably be WAY more powerful than needed. The requirements would include no oil mess getting on the wool, the motor must survive fiber particles, it it should be quiet. The manual machine has a 5:1 gear ratio, so if that shaft were motorized I couldn't see more than a 300rpm motor. I have no feel for the power needed, however.

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      • #4
        Something like this, perhaps? https://www.surpluscenter.com/item.a...tname=electric



        - Bart
        Bart Smaalders
        http://smaalders.net/barts

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        • #5
          I'd try a windshield wiper motor, that's about the right speed and not too expensive.

          Igor

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          • #6
            Long long ago they were women powered. I have my grandmothers spinning wheel that her grandfather made & I loved to watch her use it when I was young. Then it was common life now your an artisan. Just last night my wife got out a quilt her grandmother made & still remembered where all the pcs of cloth came from. Sometimes I wonder if all this progress was really progress.
            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
            country, in easy stages."
            ~ James Madison

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            • #7
              I think it would be useful to watch what the carding process actually involves:-
              http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/tut...he-drum-carder

              You can see that the process requires operator control over speed and direction and I suspect there is considerable torque required when the drum is nearly full. Perhaps there are reasons why the motorized carders are so expensive..

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              • #8
                OK, please ignore my last post!!!!

                I did find a video of an electric carder in use and the drums turned much faster than hand speed so obviously slow speed is not a requirement for the process.

                If I was doing this I would make a wooden box that the carder could be placed on and extend the carder's belt to drive off a pulley on the side of the box. There is a cheap Chinese drill press lying on my shelf that would make an ideal mechanism having an adequate sized motor and cone pulleys to give a few speed choices.

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                • #9
                  I suggest a cordless drill, say 12 volt. Get a dial-type speed controller from Deal Extreme or similar. Just use the motor and transmission. Somebody will scrap a perfectly good Makita, Porter Cable or similar, and they have all-metal transmissions-What speed would you like?
                  Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                  • #10
                    Shame your not it the UK...I could have given you a 0-100rpm 12vdc 100w golf trolley motor..

                    same as this one..

                    Rob

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                    • #11
                      The Dude that makes them says the motor draws .67 amps.

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                      • #12
                        How about a BBQ rotisserie motor?

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                        • #13
                          Why not a Bar-B-Que rotisserie motor? My >02$, Wayne.

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                          • #14
                            Use a windshield wiper motor and power it with a computer power supply a dimmer switch for variable speed. Another possibility is a sewing machine motor with the variable speed foot switch.

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                            • #15
                              If you are going to essentially, replace the hand crank with the motor, then I would think 60 rpm max? only as picture your wife spinning the hand crank....300 rpm is quite a rapid arm movement. Digi key sells many motors and controllers but one I grabbed (I had selected 12 VDC supply but you may use others, a wall adapter will run most of these, if chosen with consideration for current draw) is this one....http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail...212-ND/1197751

                              This in conjunction with a sewing machine foot switch and I would think that you could very closely replicate the motion she currently uses. Maybe watch her for like 10-20 minutes are really note how fast she would actually spin, max. These motors come in a huge variety of speeds, voltages, etc. They are everywhere, even many BBQ rotisseries, as mentioned above.
                              Here is the generic link to "motors" and in stock

                              http://www.digikey.ca/product-search...&stock=1&fid=0

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