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Thoughts On Why Lathe Saddle Sticks Sometimes

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  • Thoughts On Why Lathe Saddle Sticks Sometimes

    This has been an issue for several years now. Sometimes the saddle just seems to stick or move with more resistance than it should. Save you breath on the replies like the clamps, carriage gears or lock. It's none of those things, I've checked all of that. If I oil the ways it glides with little effort and shortly after I can feel the resistance or drag start to increase. The only thing I can think of is that the the saddle V and bed ways are worn so flat that after a few passes the oil pushes out from between the two surfaces and like a suction forms and the surfaces wring togather like gage blocks do.
    You can see that the scrape marks are gone on the one side of the V. Since I have this off would it do any good to put some random scrape marks where it's worn??? Perhaps it would allow some oil to remain under there and prevent this thing from sticking as it does. Thoughts..................

    JL.............................




  • #2
    What oil are you using? You should be using something with tactifiers for this very reason. I personally use bar and chain oil (chainsaw) because it is cheap and easily available. Many will say get actual way oil.
    Andy

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    • #3
      Originally posted by vpt View Post
      ...I personally use bar and chain oil (chainsaw) because it is cheap and easily available. Many will say get actual way oil.
      That's what they make way oil for...
      Keith
      __________________________
      Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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      • #4
        1) use way oil.

        2) modify the carriage so that it has oilers on the wings..... to get oil UNDER it from the oilers. I did that to my Logan, and it makes a world of difference.

        Now you are relying on whatever is "wiped-in", which, since you presumably have way wipers, is rather little.....

        Some of these pics are from the gen-1 system with oilers on headstock side. Later I changed the carriage to the newer type, and had to do it again,.... that time I put them on the tailstock side of the crosslide







        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          I did that too! Only had one cup at the time the pic was taken.

          Andy

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          • #6
            Use a name brand way oil and forget about running a chain saw - you have a lathe.

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            • #7
              1 Gallon of Vac-2 Way oil will set you back a whopping $18.00 plus shipping.
              An Enco code will probably get you free shipping or sumpin'.
              Avoid the Pub this week, and you'll save enough money to buy the oil.
              A gallon will last quite a while too.
              Link: Vactra #2 Way Oil
              .
              .
              .
              Last edited by KiddZimaHater; 03-18-2013, 01:10 AM.

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              • #8
                I use Tru-Edge semi synthetic way oil, not cheap stuff.
                There are oilers on the wings..... you can see the holes in the picture. Not the toilet lid type, mine has the spring loaded ball type which I'm not crazy about because it's tough to get aq good seal between the oil can tip and the ball fitting.

                JL.................

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                • #9
                  ... One can also get Way Oil at your local Mobile Oil Distributor. Look them up in the yellow pages of your phone book.

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                  • #10
                    If the ways or carriage has worn remarkably, check that there is no ridge at the top of the V-way that would likely contact the saddle. In some cases it can start to bear the load and as it is not smooth, it binds heavily.
                    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                    • #11
                      There are no ridges worn any where. The ways are flame hardened. Everything is smooth, maybe too smooth.

                      JL............
                      Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund View Post
                      If the ways or carriage has worn remarkably, check that there is no ridge at the top of the V-way that would likely contact the saddle. In some cases it can start to bear the load and as it is not smooth, it binds heavily.

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                      • #12
                        You have what we call stick slip. Have you every rung gage blocks together. You rub to super flat surfaces together and they stick together as if they are magnetized. You need to at a minimum scrape new rows of oil pockets that are at least .0002" deep. Or 1/2 moon flake them. If you do not have that skill maybe a local rebuilder will do it for you. Your heading doesn't tell us where you are located, but maybe one of the forum scrapers can help you out. I am in Minnesota and would flake it for you for nothing or say lunch. LOL I work for food" It would take maybe 15 min with a Biax 1/2 moon flaker. If you look were to blue up the ways and rub the saddle to it you would have 100% contact and no place for the oil to go. If you have oil holes if the way is so flat the oil won't drain onto the ways if it can't run out. When we scrape we say we need 50% low spots to hold the oil and 50% high spots to carry the weight.
                        There a couple of threads on here right now talking about scraping, so you can see what I mean. One is by Peter in the UK called the Adventures of Scraping. Or Keyword my name as I have been writing in it. You need to mill or grind oil grooves into the bottom of the saddle too. The after that is done I would use Mobil Vactra 2 way oil or #68 way oil.
                        Last edited by Richard King; 03-18-2013, 11:11 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Agreed with everyone here about way oil.
                          Are you using it? If not, DO.
                          I was amazed how much diffrence it made on my lathe. My tailstock would actualy slide after I gave it a shove. before it would just stop dead.

                          My carriage actualy slides easily enough that I spin the feed handle then push the carriage itself when I need to move it long distances. And thats on a 12x36
                          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                          • #14
                            Richard, glad you found my post as you have confirmed what I had thought all along as being the problem with the saddle. OK, you call it stick slip, so there is a name for it and it's a common problem after two surfaces have worn smoothly togather. I have been following you posts and was almost going to PM you with my questions. The way I described this in my first post was it's the same feeling as wringing two gage blocks togather, just as you described.
                            Since the bed ways are flame hardened there isn't anything I can do with them but perhaps most of the wear is in the saddle V.
                            My thought was to just put some random scrape marks in the worn area and kind of just copy the pattern and spacing as it appears on the other side. No point in inking anything as I can see where the wear is. Hopefully this will cure the problem. I don't have a Biax power scraper but could make a scraper to do the job if I have an idea what the cutting edge should look like. Now I think I'm getting somewhere. Thanks.............
                            P.S............ would love to buy you lunch and dinner for your help and services but were close to a couple thousand miles apart.

                            JL........................

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                            • #15
                              JoeLee, Perhaps Richard King is right, his diagnosis is a definite possibility, but consider this, he gave you the answer you wanted to hear. The easiest thing to do is try is Way Oil, first. It may resolve your issue without all the effort or expense of scraping, and the use of Way oil is a good thing anyway. Had it been used all along perhaps the ways wouldn't have worn smooth as soon as this. One more point, lots of folks out here have old machines (me for instance 1943 Logan) with ways that are smooth. I'm not all that certain the ways on my lathe weren't ground at the factory and not scraped as there are no telltale scrape marks hear the headstock where the saddle doesn't travel. That said, I have never had an issue with stick slip.

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