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Timesaver lapping compounds

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  • Timesaver lapping compounds

    I came across this site while surfing and thought it might be useful to some of you guys who do a bit of lapping. Does it work as advertised? No idea!

    http://www.newmantools.com/lapping/time.htm
    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

  • #2
    I think that macona guy has spoken about this stuff before...

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    • #3
      If it sounds too good to be true......

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      • #4
        There is a pamphlet somewhere on the net that can be printed out and assembled into a booklet that shows several interesting uses for the product.

        It is not a cure all. But for certain applications it does work as advertised.
        Gene

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        • #5
          I've never felt there was a solid, plausible explanation or reason as to why it should work as they claim, you're just supposed to believe. So I always questioned whether it does (entirely) breakdown and go away. If the abrasive particle is hard enough to cut, why isn't it hard enough to embed and keep cutting? I haven't used it, but would either need to understand why i could trust its claims or set up some experiments to see for my self.

          Anyone know the science or done some proper experimentation?
          .

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          • #6
            I have no opinion one way or the other and will probably never use the product. However, Newman Tools seems to be a well established distributor with a sound product line, nothing to indicate that they would offer something off the wall like most snake oil sellers do.

            The brochure pdf is at the bottom of the page in the link. It does appear to have some merit. It would be interesting to see some user comments with names of the companies.
            Jim H.

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            • #7
              I was introduced to Timesavers 30 years ago by a Bliss Punch Press Factory Tech I was helping refit a 20" crankshaft connecting rod bearing in a GE Plant. He said they had been using it in the factory for years with no negative results. It was slick. The cap had laminated shims between the cap and rod and we took out one layer was I think (been a while ago) it was .005" and we mixed up the yellow type with oil and poured it in on the crank-shaft. Then bolted it together keeping the bolts a little loose. Turn on the machine and let it free cycle for a few minutes, then tightened the boths a little and cycled it again. he kept track of the temp by just holding his hand on the iron when we would tighten the bolts, after about an hour we had the bolts tight. We took apart the unit and cleaned it up, then we spoon scraped the bushings to give them oil pockets, blew out the oil lines and assembled it. I never herd a word fom GE. I always say no news is good news. If it had failed, we would have been back in there, but never heard a word. Since then I have used it in Barber Coleman tapered headstock spindle bearing / bushings. In several others, to numerous to remember. That booklet was done by the US Navy and they showed the results of studies they made in propeller shafts and they found it did not embed.
              I would use it tomorrow if I had a bronze or brass bushing to fit.

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              • #8
                I worked with the Navy Yard in Portsmouth VA for many years, the toolmakers there recommend it for certain jobs. It does wear out and has to be re-applied when worn, I have a can of green (for steel) and yellow (for bronze) in my shop and use them when needed. It does not seem to embed or remain active, I clean off the remains after doing the job.
                Steve

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                  I've never felt there was a solid, plausible explanation or reason as to why it should work as they claim, you're just supposed to believe.
                  Anyone know the science or done some proper experimentation?
                  I've never used it, but Timesaver is crushed garnet, which disintegrates over time, and doesn't embed.

                  You can buy crushed garnet from any lapidary supply, and it's advertised for the same purpose: non-embedding lapping compound.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lazlo View Post
                    I've never used it, but Timesaver is crushed garnet, which disintegrates over time, and doesn't embed.

                    You can buy crushed garnet from any lapidary supply, and it's advertised for the same purpose: non-embedding lapping compound.
                    I didn't know it was garnet, but still, why wouldn't it embed if its hard enough to cut?
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                      I didn't know it was garnet, but still, why wouldn't it embed if its hard enough to cut?
                      I vaguely remember reading the explanation, which seemed plausible: that the garnet crystal fractures on cleave lines from the lapping pressure, and reduces into dust.

                      It's a lot more expensive than conventional lapping compound, so I've never bothered, but McMaster carries it.
                      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                      • #12
                        The MSDS says natural abrasive and silica. I agree with McGyver; if it is hard enough to cut steel, it is hard enough to embed, especially if you are using the bearing for the lap.
                        Last edited by tdmidget; 03-19-2013, 11:43 AM.

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                        • #13
                          interesting. I'm not anti-timesaver, just wanted more than anecdotes as to the why. They offer sampler kits of 3oz of each type. While not super cheap, as I understand it that the 3 oz is just the powder...when you mix it with oil it does give a decent quantity.
                          .

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                          • #14
                            There is a small lapping supply co. www.us-products.com/home.html that has garnet lapping paste, probably very similar. We have used it for years and if it embeds, we have never seen it. I have also used a oil slurry with Bon Ami to good effect, although it breaks down quickly.

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                            • #15
                              I use Timesaver (yellow) all the time on bushings and engine babbitt. Works great but the stuff smells like dried vomit.

                              A little goes a long way too.

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