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  • flat spring

    what do you guys use, if you need to make a flat spring, e.g. like this:



    i was lucky, when shopping at aldis today, i saw this little hand rake for $3. so i cut off one of the "fingers" and i can still use it as intended (or mutilate it further) and its stainless too.

    but say, you need a stronger/ bigger spring, what material would you use, that is "easily accessible"?

  • #2
    afaik you need spring steel. I bought a selection years ago from an ME vendor that lets me make little bits and pieces as needed, very handy....you might try gunsmith supply places
    .

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    • #3
      Mcgyver's right, but phosphor bronze is also good - that's what I usually use.

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      • #4
        www.brownells.com used to sell, and presumably still does, assortments of annealed flat spring stock.
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          Large width lumber strapping is good although it can be dangerous to handle if coiled. I have some 2" wide material that is great spring steel.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Also the about 1/2" wide strapping used to bundle shakes and lumber. I use a concrete, carbide bit to drill when I need to anchor the spring. Wayne.

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            • #7
              Could use 2 pieces.
              mark costello-Low speed steel

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              • #8
                Grab an old dipstick out of an engine, most are high enough carbon to be quite springy.

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                • #9
                  A cheap hacksaw blade, not a bimetal blade

                  Joe B

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                  • #10
                    Any steel of 0.4 carbon or higher will make a decent spring. I've used many things, even feeler gauge stock. Steel strapping varies..... some is hardenable, and some seems to be dead soft. I have some that I wanted to make a replacement clock spring from, and it refuses to harden at all.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      What's the contraption in the picture?
                      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                      • #12
                        the contraption is my new press:



                        it has a ratcheting lever that is adjustable.

                        the saw blade idea is good, except that you need to get ridd of the teeth.

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                        • #13
                          Stainless steel can work, if there's not much motion. I've also used strapping, but as suggested some of it is too soft. I've kept some on hand from years ago, and it's pretty decent. If you want an experience with springs, take apart a recoil starter from a lawnmower, chainsaw, or snowmobile. If it doesn't hack you up and take out your eyes, you could use strips from that.

                          If you have need of a much stronger flat spring, you could explore a window crank mechanism. It has a strong flat coil spring. Many of these you would likely have to soften, shape, then re-harden. Another source for a similar spring would be from a hood spring mechanism. I haven't seen one of those for a long time now, but I'm sure they could still be found at car graveyards.
                          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                          • #14
                            Press for doing what? Looks food-related or bev-related.
                            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                            • #15
                              I must have a couple of hundred feet of stainless spring steel, about 2" wide in a coil. It was a rope winder for a window cleaning cradle/
                              Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                              Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                              Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                              Monarch 10EE 1942

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