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Photos to Identify please - Dad's lathe, accessories, other items Part 1

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  • Photos to Identify please - Dad's lathe, accessories, other items Part 1

    Based on my prior post http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...k-change/page3

    Folks here asked to see more photos of what is in Dad's workshop. Dad has recently moved in to a nursing home, and I need to work on clearing things out. I request some help identifying stuff, and figuring out which parts go with what.

    First, we have the Atlas 10 inch metal lathe.
    Photo number 48. Someone had asked what is it on? Not the stand, but a table Dad made with drawers and bottom shelf (all full, of course!)


    Photo Number 44. I suspect some of the items in this drawer go WITH the lathe?


    Photo Number 45. One other drawer. Recognize anything that goes with the lathe?


    Photo 46. Another drawer.




    More photos to come: they are in a separate thread, here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...r-items-Part-2
    Last edited by Freedom2be; 03-26-2013, 11:18 PM.

  • #2
    Photo 44...
    most of that goes with, I'd just include it all. I see a chuck, toolpost wrench, cutters, tool holders, at least one center drill, a "fishtail" thread tool gage, taper adapters, a chuck wrench, drilling rest, etc.

    Photo 45
    maybe... photo is fuzzy. The thing at right that is a cylindrical tube with teeth on one end is a hole saw. it and any others like it would go with the drill, or get sold as a set.
    Can't tell what is in the loops on side of drawer..... could be drills, maybe reamers, ????? A case of "you gotta be there".


    Photo 46.
    The spiral pointy thing is a reamer that goes with the pipe threading stuff. Just above it is a drill chuck that may or may not have a taper that fits the lathe. Other stuff is mostly hidden, dunno what it is.
    .
    .
    .

    What you have is a mess.... charitably called a puzzle. You absolutely cannot handle it without some organization and method.

    With situations like this, you need to find a big open flat area.... or a lot of boxes..... You start at one side and go through everything. When you find something like the hole saw, you put it somewhere on your flat area. Every time you find another one like it, you put it with the ones you already found.

    Pretty soon you are getting things sorted out.

    The good thing about that is that you do NOT even need to know anything about the stuff. If you start putting things that seem alike together, you will save whoever you get to help you a LOT of time...... They can come and see your groups, sort out whatever errors you may have made (there will be some no doubt), and get things identified. Then you can decide what to do.

    Rule number one:
    Look at anything you don't understand, and try to decide if it looks like it was made like it is on purpose..... is it smoothly finished? even if it is intended to be rough like a file, you can tell it was made like that for a reason.

    That one rule can help sort junk from "things".

    In case of doubt, put stuff you don't know about in it's own pile... someone will know.

    Old wire, and other fairly obvious junk can be set aside in a barrel or box.

    All the old bolts etc can be set aside also.

    Try not to throw away anything until it has been positively identified as junk. That is the first rule of people who run estate sales.... they tell the family not to throw out anything first.... In one case I know the family had bags of "old paper trash" that they were going to toss before the sale people got there.
    Those bags of "paper trash" had collectible stuff in it that sold for a total of over $500.........

    And, as a matter of fact..... you might do worse than to check out estate sale companies..... There must be some. They KNOW what to do, they handle the whole thing, and it's in their interest to get as much as possible for it. Find one that can handle tools OK..... not all of them have a clue.

    It's OK to do some sorting before they come to check out the place, that may help them..... just no throwing out.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      Again,, also very good advice!

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, J Tiers. That helps. It all looks like "a bunch of Dad's stuff" to me! Ha ha haaa.

        Comment


        • #5
          I know all about that....... the "its HUUUUGE" reaction... just before the glaze-over when everything looks alike.

          Once you start seeing the pieces as individual things with a shape and surfaces, etc, you are getting in "tune". You can say "oh, this is like that one". No need to know how to use them.

          One at a time you can deal with it. A big pile-o-stuff is plain scary until you pick it up piece by piece.


          It evens out.....

          I look at the accessory "feet" for my wife's sewing machine, and THEY all look alike to ME... all funny little gizmos... not to her, of course, each does a different thing. But, I can send her to get a half-inch combination wrench, and she'll come back with the right thing.... She knows more about my machines and tools than I do about hers.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Comment


          • #6
            JT's advice is good, especially sorting into pile of 'lookalikes'. However when you get those piles take pictures and show there here as I would hate to think someone get a nice set of micrometers in with a pile of G clamps (for example)!

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless you intend to keep it... don't bother sorting; sell the entire mess as a lot.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
                Unless you intend to keep it... don't bother sorting; sell the entire mess as a lot.
                The ONE problem with that is the enormous discount you will have to give.

                You will have no idea what is in it, and likely the only offers will be scrappers who will be paying for it (if they will pay at all) on the basis that all of it is just broken scrap metal. So many cents per pound, and since you won't be weighing it, you may not even get that. You'll get the place "cleared", but you will probably take a severe "haircut" on the sale price, if you can get ANY "price".

                if you are interested in having your dad's stuff go to people who will keep using it, that's not the way to go. Ditto if you would like to get the best price for it, which amounts to the same thing. Most scrappers take it on the basis of "we clear the place for free, our pay is when we sell it." They can't pay close to scrap value, that's all THEY can get, after the work of carrying it away.

                If you just need to clear the property as soon as possible of "all that junk" then go ahead.

                Just by selling the lathe, and not one other thing, you will probably realize more money than if you sold the lot to the scrappers. And you can still scrap the junk.

                Scrappers love old wire, ...... copper is popular, even though the price for insulated wire is lower, and many junk dealers won't take wire which has had the insulation burned off.
                Last edited by J Tiers; 03-27-2013, 08:28 AM.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not talking "scrappers" and no disrespect to anyones DAD here, but the only thing I see of any value is the lathe and couple of closely associated items (that go with the lathe). To be clear... I'd sell the lathe at "market" and throw in the rest. Just advertise it as "Lathe and tooling", and don't take the first offer - hold out for a week or more.

                  I've bought many things like that - I haul it all home then toss out most of the junk or trade it with buddies. Sometime's I wonder why..
                  Last edited by lakeside53; 03-27-2013, 11:19 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    I know all about that....... the "its HUUUUGE" reaction... just before the glaze-over when everything looks alike.
                    Once you start seeing the pieces as individual things with a shape and surfaces, etc, you are getting in "tune". You can say "oh, this is like that one". No need to know how to use them.

                    One at a time you can deal with it. A big pile-o-stuff is plain scary until you pick it up piece by piece.


                    It evens out.....

                    I look at the accessory "feet" for my wife's sewing machine, and THEY all look alike to ME... all funny little gizmos... not to her, of course, each does a different thing. But, I can send her to get a half-inch combination wrench, and she'll come back with the right thing.... She knows more about my machines and tools than I do about hers.
                    The stuff I am stuck on, like the lathe, Dad has not used it since I was about 10 years old. I have already brought the 8 drills (WHY anyone needs EIGHT when we only have 2 hands, I have yet to discover), drill bits, and 2 sanders here to my house, I use those, as a home owner. But so much of it I can't even recall seeing him use it, so that is where I am stuck.
                    Last edited by Freedom2be; 03-27-2013, 05:06 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      re: Why anyone needs 8 drills:

                      That is so you don't have to change drill bit sizes, just grab another drill!!!

                      That is part of what this tool, addiction is about, can't resist having an extra one. I see guys, and there would be some here, with 5-6 lathes, 5-6 drill presses, one guy i see has like 14 bench grinders,,,, (All oldies restored of course!)- (Your'e dad would have been a great neighbour!!)

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                      • #12
                        LOL, oh OK. He he heee So basically, it is one for each step in the job!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Now you are catching on! I told you it was an addiction.
                          Now you see how eight drills are needed. Next thing is to think about the lathe as drill #9.
                          Soon after that you will have "senior member" under your screen name.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was beginning to feel really bad, knowing that I only have 4 drills. Then I realized that I have 9 routers. This is the "slippery slope" you hear so much about. It's also steep. Enjoy the ride.

                            Wheeeee!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I found a router MANUAL, but have yet to find the router, lol.

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