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Sourch for 5/8" turned/ground/polish/chrome plate rod?

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  • Sourch for 5/8" turned/ground/polish/chrome plate rod?

    Howdy Folks,

    Big puddle of power steering fluid under the backhoe this morning, which means time to rebuild the steering cylinder. Replacement parts are not available, which isn't surprising given it's from 1957. No biggie, as it's a fairly simple design and all it needs is a new piston rod and seals (rod is scored beyond use). Problem is, neither Grainger nor McMaster seem to have 5/8" turned/ground/polished/chrome plate rod. Any idea where to source it from? Kinda in a hurry on this, as I just had 21 tons of rock delivered this morning and need the backhoe to move it...

    BTW, I've given thought to using ground stainless instead, but there's a piece that gets welded onto the end of the rod and I'm not sure about silver solder/braze being strong enough.

    Thx!

    -aric.

  • #2
    Nevermind... After seeing Fastenal didn't have it either I turned to Google, which turned up http://baileynet.com/hydraulics/bail...rod_and_tubes/. They're in TN, so I went ahead and ordered it. Figure I'll leave this here in case anyone else runs into a need for TG&P Chrome Plate....

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    • #3
      I was just wondering, would Thompson rod have been usable for this application?

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      • #4
        Just a quick check with Google brought up this vendor for hydraulic cylinder repair parts. You might even find someone local

        http://www.crconline.com/components/..._ram_products/

        John

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        • #5
          Any decent hydraulic cylinder rebuild shop should have that on hand locally, you should be able to pick something that common up today. Heck if I can do it out here in the boonies I'm sure you wont have a problem in Philly.
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

          Location: British Columbia

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          • #6
            My first thought was to try a hydraulic repair/heavy equipment shop. They probably have a pile of parts donors near the dumpster. Then I thought of auto repair shops that replace suspension struts. Those struts have beautiful shafts, but don't know if any are 5/8", probably all metric.

            Out in the garage, I have a 5/8" shaft from some sort of an HP printer (probably a plotter) that has an excellent finish. Only problem is that it's cross drilled and threaded every 8 to 10 inches. It has been getting used, 8 to 10 inches at a time.

            Glenn

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Oldguy View Post
              ...auto repair shops that replace suspension struts. Those struts have beautiful shafts, but don't know if any are 5/8", probably all metric.
              Just a suggestion about those shafts. Make sure & take vicegrip pliers with you when picking them out. Clamp down on the threaded end & rotate the shaft looking closely at the shaft for straightness. I brought home a pair of beefy struts with 21mm shafts a couple yrs ago. I finally got around to opening them up & removing the shafts recently. One was straight; the other was bent at least .060".
              Milton

              "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

              "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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              • #8
                McMaster Carr does have precision plated shafting. Part number 5947K14 is for 12" length. They have it available up to 48" length.
                Jim H.

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                • #9
                  You can try.....

                  http://baileynet.com/

                  www.neufellmachining.com

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                  • #10
                    @JCHannum- Thanks! And CRAP!!!! I *knew* they had it, but for the life of me I couldn't find it either online or in the paper catalog (literally spent an hour and a half searching both McMaster and Grainger, online and catalogs). Never occurred to me to look under "shaft" rather than "rod" or "raw materials". Oh well, no point in steering now. McMaster would have been cheaper and gotten it to me tomorrow, but no way to cancel the order at Baileynet.com.

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                    • #11
                      I knew they had it as I had bought some to repair a hydraulic tracer cylinder a few years ago. While their catalog is excellent, sometimes you run into a problem with definitions such as this. I have never hesitated to call if I had a question or couldn't find an item. They are a class act in all respects and will go out of their way to source something they don't normally carry.
                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        I buy a lot of stuff through both Bailey and CRC,both are good companies to deal with and fairly swift on shipping.

                        One question though,did you get Chrome rod or Induction hardened chrome rod?

                        The latter is better suited for high load applications such as steering cylinder shafts,but either one will work.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JCHannum View Post
                          They are a class act in all respects and will go out of their way to source something they don't normally carry.
                          Absolutely. I *love* McMaster (heck, they once sent my order out next day first thing courier with no up-charge just because they had another in the area!), and frankly this is the first time I've ever run into this. Seemed such an obvious thing to find that I never thought to call!
                          Last edited by adatesman; 04-08-2013, 09:52 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                            One question though,did you get Chrome rod or Induction hardened chrome rod?
                            Good question. No idea. Did mention what it was for, but no clue whether it registered with the guy.

                            Fwiw, the original is soft under the chrome so it doesn't matter either way.

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