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Latest Plane From the Brese Plane Shop

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  • Latest Plane From the Brese Plane Shop

    Pictures of the latest plane. Just finished yesterday. Sole length is 9.125, uses a 2.125" wide 0-1 iron. The body is 410 Stainless and the wooden bits are Macassar ebony. Don't know which is harder the iron or the Macassar ebony. The Macassar is a pain to work but the effort is rewarded when the shellac polish finish is applied.

    Ron





    www.breseplane.com
    http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com

    Everything will be okay in the end, if it's not okay then it's not the end.

  • #2
    Beautiful work!
    gbritnell

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    • #3
      Very nice work.

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      • #4
        Darned nice piece!!

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        • #5
          Gorgeous work!

          Do you mean Madagascar Ebony?
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            I'm surprised Macassar ebony isn't on the forbidden wood list. Great looking tool!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lazlo View Post
              Gorgeous work!

              Do you mean Madagascar Ebony?

              Probably the same wood as Macassar is very close to Madagascar.

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              • #8
                http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-...acassar-ebony/

                You're welcome.

                Phil

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                • #9
                  Ron,

                  Not only do I want to compliment you on a fine job on the plane but also of photographing it. Do you use a light box? How do you finish the angles on the frame?
                  I also think that plane would be a good candidate for the shop made tools thread.
                  Thanks for posting it.

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dp View Post
                    I'm surprised Macassar ebony isn't on the forbidden wood list. Great looking tool!
                    Gibson Guitars was surprised to find that it was!


                    Actually, the wood that Gibson was fined for importing was called Madagascar Ebony, and as far as I can tell from a quick Google, it is a different species of the same genus (Diospyros perrieri versus Diospyros celebica). "Diospyros" means "Of the Gods," and it sure looks it. It sounds like Madagascar Ebony is actually from Madagascar, and Macassar is basically the same wood from India and other places. I have worked with Madagascar Ebony, and it sure looks the same as Macassar.

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                    • #11
                      I meant to add that it is really beautiful metal work, as well as woodwork. I know what it takes to get such a perfect finish on any metal, especially stainless steel.

                      My hat's off to you!

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                      • #12
                        Another beauty Ron, man that looks smooth! PM-V11 irons in your future?

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                        • #13
                          Very nice indeed. How are you holding the sides to the sole? I see pins? Or are they bolts that have been ground off?

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the nice compliments on this plane. I also appreciate the comments on the photography. Thanks to a friend my photography skills have come a long way in the last year, and yes these were taken in a light box which is basically a pvc frame covered with a sheet and all the fixtures on the exterior supplying the light have daylight bulbs installed.

                            From what I am told by some very knowledgeable people Madagascar Ebony is one of the truest black ebonies, more intensely black than West African Gabon. Even though it's not evident in these pictures the Macassar ebony is variegated. It looks as if you swirled dark and milk chocolate together. The problem with showing that in these pictures was because these pieces were particularly dark for the species and if I increased the exposure to show more of the variegation then the edges of the plane body tended to loose it's definition against the white background.

                            You can buy Macassar ebony from several sources here in the U.S. so it's not a banned material. The billets I have are quite unique, and estimated to have been in the country more than 20 years. This material has a specific gravity of 1.06 and is one of the most difficult materials to work that I have encountered. After working this material Gabon ebony is a bit of a cake walk.

                            The plane body is assembled using a combination of threaded pins and taper pins. The assembly pins are peined, milled flushed and then the sides are ground. Once all the other fixings are in place for holding the wooden bits in place the sole is ground and the sides are lapped. The major design problem with this configuration of tool was creating the method to hold the wooden pieces without having any visible hardware. I wanted these planes to be as simple and clean looking as possible.

                            The PMV-11 irons are a proprietary item belonging to Lee Valley/Veritas Tools. Just as well, I'm not ready to give up high carbon steel. Almost all of my planes are finishing planes and you just can't beat high carbon steel for that application.

                            This tool embodies two difficult to work materials, the Macassar Ebony and Stainless Steel. Like any other material once you learn what process and what tooling to use it becomes easier to accomplish the work, however when you approach working stainless you do need to be attentive and pretty much on your game. I don't have cnc machinery and given that there are a lot of contours to create on a tool of this type I do have some very unorthodox, yet surprisingly effective methods for accomplishing that part of the process.

                            Thanks again for the compliments and for having a look,

                            Ron
                            Last edited by Breze; 04-10-2013, 09:23 AM.
                            www.breseplane.com
                            http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com

                            Everything will be okay in the end, if it's not okay then it's not the end.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That is most handsome. Well wear! I hope it will see much use in making equally beautiful woodwork.

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