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  • What Tool.. Im Confused!!

    Not being an engineer myself, is there a book or dvd i can buy to explain what the right cutting tools (shape) to use
    on various turning jobs?
    Im just guessing with them at the moment.. theres so many shapes & angles to work with its confusing (to me anyway?)

    Ive looked on youtube at plenty of cutting being turned, but none of them explain what cutting tool is used? like i said, im just
    guessing and i know it involves tool angles and turning speeds to get the right results.. how do i face a steel bar to a mirror finish?
    mine has lines cut in it?

    Im missing out somewhere..

    Rustyiron

  • #2
    Start here ... "How To Run A Lathe".

    https://play.google.com/store/books/...AAAYAAJ&rdot=1

    Beginning on page 24, you can see the different tool shapes and uses.
    Last edited by gcude; 04-12-2013, 08:43 PM.
    Cheers,
    Gary

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    • #3
      Re How to Run A Lathe - you just jogged my memory. I checked the bookshelf and there is was, a well used copy of the 35th addition of How to Run a Lathe
      This one a believe came with an old South bend Lathe my father used to have that was made in the early 1920's
      There is a very interesting list inside the back cover entitled How to Become a Machinist.
      If anyone is interested I could type it out here.
      At the bottom of the page is a note stating that A Blue Print (12 in X 18 in) of the above 16 suggestions,
      suitable for wall display, will be mailed upon receipt of 10 cents to cover the cost of mailing.
      Larry - west coast of Canada

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      • #4
        This is a pretty good base chart to go off of.

        Andy

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        • #5
          you might find these videos by Mr Peterson interesting - they're about how to grind your own tools, but show nicely what the different shapes are for:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrDr4rYLiAk
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRyqIm5JR5s
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTQ46NMMc88

          MrPete also offers a complete 'how to run a lathe' course on a memory stick for purchase:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuo9AP6rrTM

          Happy turning!

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          • #6
            The basics are you use the tool that does not get in the way of the shoulder your trying to make, and better yet can be used to chamfer parts as needed or do some other 2nd ops.

            If doing lots of roughing, try one with a large radius or 45 degree lead in angle so it can 'thin' the chip, and with idealy a light lead out angle so the tip has lots of support (ie, a wide tip, not a narrow pointy tip)

            Note how the finishing tools in the above diagram are pointy, thats so you can get them into narrow spaces, Not that they need to be pointy to do finishing, its just they can be because they don't need the strenth of a roughing tool.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              If you like videos instead of books there is always Smartflix, plenty of basic info on tools and tool grinding.

              http://smartflix.com/


              Ed P

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              • #8
                Several excellent resources mentioned already.

                You sure you need a mirror finish? Not just shiny? A mirror finish is a virtual impossibility with conventional turning tools and common materials.

                Shiny? Yes. MIrror finish after a separate finishing operation? Yes.

                And keep practicing. Book knowledge + first hand experience is pretty much unbeatable.

                doug

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                • #9
                  Thanks for your input guys.. ive ordered the book from amazon, and looking forward to it !

                  Rustyiron

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                  • #10
                    I have a "Lathe Operation and Machinists Tables", From Engineering Dept, Atlas Press Company, published by Craftsman. I just checked and there are used ones still available for around $60. I bought mine around 1959 when a friend and mentor gave me his 1942, 9X36, Logan and I still use it regularly. Good luck.

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                    • #11
                      try youtube with tubal cain he explains tools geometry and use well for free or anyof the others here.Have fun theres no shame in starting out somewhere it's not that difficult. Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Black_Moons View Post
                        The basics are you use the tool that does not get in the way of the shoulder your trying to make, and better yet can be used to chamfer parts as needed or do some other 2nd ops.

                        If doing lots of roughing, try one with a large radius or 45 degree lead in angle so it can 'thin' the chip, and with ideally a light lead out angle so the tip has lots of support (ie, a wide tip, not a narrow pointy tip)

                        Note how the finishing tools in the above diagram are pointy, that's so you can get them into narrow spaces, Not that they need to be pointy to do finishing, its just they can be because they don't need the strength of a roughing tool.

                        This is SO true! There is no "magic" shape that one must follow.

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                        • #13
                          I have that same book and was just looking at the illustrations. They show all sides in profile so you can see much more clearly what the entire tool profile should look like. Here's an example:

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