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Bolts That Can Kill !!!!!!!

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  • Bolts That Can Kill !!!!!!!

    Wow, I found this while researching some info on bolts.
    How many of these initials have you seen on bolts????? I've seen several of them, but never gave it much thought, at least not this much. I've seen the "KS" stamp on bolts in many applications.

    JL........................


    http://www.choice-distribution.com/bolts.htm

  • #2
    Thanks, I'll have to check the bolts that sheared on my factory installed hitch last year while pulling an 18 foot trailer. It was loaded with a 9 X 42 Enco 3HP mill, that was pretty evenly loaded, maybe slightly tongue heavy. But the truck wasn't any where near squatting. Bolts sheared when I hit a very slight bump onto a bridge on Interstate at 70MPH. Makes me wonder, if I had some counterfit bolts?

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    • #3
      Thats scary.

      JL.......................

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      • #4
        Counterfeit subpar bolts? Thats just wrong. Counterfeit stuff that can't kill people like purses.
        Andy

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        • #5
          Yep, Happens more often then you think.
          Iv heard of aircraft going down due to counterfit bolts. Others going down due to reusing 'Not to be reused' bolts.

          I would be there is at least a hundred bolts in a typical car could *each* potentialy cause fatality if it failed. (Although most would just cause failure of the engine/drivetrain, unexpected engine/drivetrain failure at the wrong time can be fatal)
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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          • #6
            That notice is from 1988. An earlier version on another site was posted 1987. I'd have thought by now this problem would be traced to China which is what made me look it up. This post is regarding Japanese bolts.

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            • #7
              Yeah that's some scary stuff alright.
              I remember reading about this years ago in the newspaper and in various trade publications that I subscribe to. It seems nothing has changed, as long as there's an extra dollar in it for someone it will continue.

              I know that in the aircraft industry, even with all of the prerequisite certs and traceability, the sale of counterfeit components is still a very real source of incidents and investigations.
              Think how hard it must be for regulatory bodies to enforce fastener traceability in the construction and transportation sectors, to name just two of many safety oriented industries affected by inferior fasteners.
              Last edited by Willy; 04-15-2013, 11:57 PM. Reason: A major dope slap to the forehead!
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dp View Post
                That notice is from 1988. An earlier version on another site was posted 1987. I'd have thought by now this problem would be traced to China which is what made me look it up. This post is regarding Japanese bolts.
                Dennis my good man, I humbly concede you excellent point.
                But it could have gotten much worse if it wasn't for the Fastener Quality Act of 1998 or was it 1999?
                I'll sit down now.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                • #9
                  That sure read like a scare tactic, implying that any bolts with those markings were sub par. Of course, the vendor posting that web page did not sell the suspect brands.

                  I seem to recall that back in the late 1990s there were several scares where grade 5 bolts were passed off as grade 8. Can you imagine your local Home Depot including a cert with each grade 8 bolt that they sell from that 1 gallon bin?

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                  • #10
                    I can produce as many certs as you want, to whatever standard you want. And I can keep doing it until the toner runs out.......................

                    Certs are like cashier's checks, anyone can make one...... or a hundred. Don't accept either one without checking at the source.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      Certs are like cashier's checks, anyone can make one...... or a hundred. Don't accept either one without checking at the source.
                      I can't imagine that checking at the source does much good. If Fastenal buys a batch of grade 8 from their supplier who bought them from a US manufacturer who has a second factory in Mexico or China .... Exactly what do you check?

                      Even a top notch supplier sometimes has an overly ambitious buyer or agent who will cut corners and buy cut rate supplies.

                      It seems the only way to ensure critical parts is to test random samples.


                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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