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  • 9 1/4" OD X .210" thick disks from 6MM thick laser cut blanks of 304 SS.
    Normally if one were to try and face such a part in the 3 jaws that are 1 1/4" wide it would chatter like mad in the 3 positions between the jaws.

    I used nearly full circumference jaws 12" diameter on an 8" chuck. Bored a 9.240 Dia. X .060 deep pocket. Used a 3/16" Dia. dowel pin in the center to lock the jaws down when boring.



    Chuck stock.


    This is important, push the stock into the jaw pocket with the tail stock using a suitable diameter plug then tighten the chuck jaws. It held .002" thickness difference around the diameter, the tolerance was +-.005".
    There is no flatness call out on the drawing as there are holes for mounting them to a part that we did not make. If placed on a surface plate and measured for flatness they may well look like a Pringle after removing the stress from the rolled surfaces, however the flatness is not specified so is SEP.


    Turn and face at will, works a charm. The aluminum jaws are less then $200.00 per set of 3. If made for a single recurring part they will last a very long time, I do a dozen or so different yet similar parts per year, the above pictured order was 4 parts. Next week it may be 6 similar parts of a slightly different OD which will require facing flat and boring a new pocket in the same jaws, they last about 1 year before they are faced down to the mounting bolt heads.

    Well worth it however considering the profit on parts being made.

    Comment


    • Looks great! Nice jaws as well. If you did a lot of sets of parts of different ODs that all had holes in the middle, couldn't you bore a bunch of different pockets and then face from the inside out with a sharp nose radious?
      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration

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      • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
        Looks great! Nice jaws as well. If you did a lot of sets of parts of different ODs that all had holes in the middle, couldn't you bore a bunch of different pockets and then face from the inside out with a sharp nose radious?
        In practice one may turn part holding features inside other part holding features on the same jaws which I often do, however once the flat backing of the original pocket becomes undercut it is no longer effective for this work. This is only the simple facing and OD turning as there are chamfers and very shallow counter bores involved that require a nice finish.

        This particular part finishes with a 5.636" bore through then a 5.986" counter bore .015" +.000 -.002" deep, the other side has a chamfer of 45 Deg. X .078"

        Then they go in a milling machine and many holes and slots are milled in them, if the first operations are done well the following mill operations are far easier. The estimated time for 4 of these parts finished is 22 hours.

        My employer can easily afford several sets of $200.00 soft jaws per year if needed (-:

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        • I didn't think about the flex from the sub pocket. You're right. That's sone very accurate work there it sounds like.
          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration

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          • Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
            Today was a continuation of the last month or so. We continued making more of the various gears and splines for a customer. Nothing really special, there. What makes it exciting for us, is that we are continuing to make and use our own Gear Shaper Cutters to do so. So far, these are the coarsest Pitch yet. But we have a job to do next week that will require making a cutter that is even coarser, so I am looking forward to making that one and seeing how it performs. We also started manufacturing the 13" and 16" SouthBend Twin Gear Sets this week. But specifically, today I finally got around to organizing and making the storage for all the change gears for the Fellows. That made me happy.







            What model Fellows gear shaper is that. I cut my teeth on one in my first shop. Eaton had a bunch of hydro strokes they used for years. Just neat machines. The only thing neater is a bevel gear cutter


            Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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            • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
              I love those wheels, they work great. Nice job.

              Today I finished the stubby (for loading purposes) cat-40 internal tapered mandrels to hold extrusions for a 4th axis production production job I'm getting ready to run. The inverted steel pyramid in the middle spreads out both the diameter and the little protrusions to lock onto the part not only axially, but radially also (the part is a keyhole type shape). The set screw on the side locks it onto the spindle drive dog as the rotational datum. I also made a plug for the tailstock end with a 60* center on the other side. Hopefully with 3 mandrels in rotation I can get speedy part changeovers. I've got 3 stations (face/bore both ends on another fixture/angle plate) to swap with every button push, and target time is 30 minutes/finished part. Gonna be close..... I hate production stuff.

              They mount into the cat-40 spindle nose I made for the Haas rotary table. Had to make the t nuts too.


              Which was machined with another boring bar that I made....



              Seemed like I had to make everything to get to this point in the process....

              Finally ready to machine some parts on Monday (after I program them this weekend). Never used a 4th axis before. Bit of a challenge so far figuring out how to program it with our software (edgecam) but I figured out some workarounds today that will at least makes some chips until I can rework the post processor, and use the program the "proper" way. I really hate manually editing code for mill work. I finger cam all my lathe programs but when it comes to the mill I want it to come out of CAM ready for the green button especially for longer running production stuff.

              Looks great Zahnrad. Pretty great feeling when you can make whatever tooling you need, to make whatever it is you need to make lol. Albeit it a pain in the ass sometimes when you HAVE to.
              Is that a lead weight on the back of the boring bar? If so neat idea to reduce chatter


              Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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              • Originally posted by Bented View Post
                My employer can easily afford several sets of $200.00 soft jaws per year if needed (-:
                Wish I could convince mine of that. I had to make these pie jaws a couple years ago (so long ago I was still using photobucket) because buying them was "too expensive". To be fair, they are an oddball size, and jaws are hard to find for it.




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                • Originally posted by jdedmon91 View Post
                  Is that a lead weight on the back of the boring bar? If so neat idea to reduce chatter


                  Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                  Yes, it's a lead hammer face I made a couple years ago to fit my Armstrong dead blow.

                  Comment


                  • [QUOTE=Dan Dubeau;1251840]Wish I could convince mine of that. I had to make these pie jaws a couple years ago (so long ago I was still using photobucket) because buying them was "too expensive". To be fair, they are an oddball size, and jaws are hard to find for it.

                    We often make dozens of sets of soft jaws at a time when there is no work for a VMC, better that it runs then sits idle. Have never made any pie jaws however. The boss has hinted at producing some 24" pie jaws for a large lathe that we have, this has yet to happen.
                    I am still doing this.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Bented View Post
                      We often make dozens of sets of soft jaws at a time when there is no work for a VMC, better that it runs then sits idle. Have never made any pie jaws however. The boss has hinted at producing some 24" pie jaws for a large lathe that we have, this has yet to happen.
                      I am still doing this.
                      I always make mill soft jaws out of scrap when I have time. Some parts we run out of mic6 tooling plate (they're all different 1 offs) have large wasted areas in the middle that instead of turning to chips I'll mill some jaws out of. Those pie jaw were the first I'd made for the lathe. Would like to make more just normal soft jaws, but can just never find the time. I need to make a hob type cutter to do the serrations quicker. I cut those ones with a single lip cutter and it was slooooow.

                      Facing that plate? I bet that one sings pretty good

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                        To be fair, they are an oddball size, and jaws are hard to find for it.
                        Why? We purchase those fairly frequently. They're not even expensive.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                          Pretty great feeling when you can make whatever tooling you need, to make whatever it is you need to make lol. Albeit it a pain in the ass sometimes when you HAVE to.
                          Yes, it CAN be! The hardest part is balancing doing so AND getting the customer's parts out the door in timely fashion. I freely admit to still riding the high of figuring out the specifics of making the Gear Shaper Cutters. I cannot even begin to convey how nice it is to be relieved of the dependence upon the five manufacturers of Shaper Cutters. Mostly, it is the independence from their 12 - 24 week wait times for cutter needs. We pushed a job out the door in two weeks that we were given a 16 - 20 week lead time for cutters on. THAT is a GREAT feeling. And knowing that we can make ANY tooth form, ANY Pitch, ANY Pressure Angle, and any combination of them in as little as a day ( if necessary ) is really a game changer for the shop. ( as well as my personal pride )

                          [QUOTE=jdedmon91;1251832]What model Fellows gear shaper is that. I cut my teeth on one in my first shop. Eaton had a bunch of hydro strokes they used for years. Just neat machines. The only thing neater is a bevel gear cutter

                          It's a 7125A Special. It began life as a Sector Gear Shaper for the Navy. Most of the Sector Gear bits have been removed or replaced with standard bits. Was a complete and utter piece of ****e when it got here. If I had known it's true and actual condition, I would never had let it be delivered. But our back was against the wall with commitments, so we paid the piper and performed a complete re-manufacture upon it. I don't ever want to go through that again.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
                            Why? We purchase those fairly frequently. They're not even expensive.
                            My memory is a bit hazy on the specific details (it's been a couple years) but I recall it's an oddball Japanese chuck with non standard size serration and pitch. I'm sure one could find cheap jaws for it but I was under a time crunch, and being new to the CNC lathe world (still am) my google fu wasn't coming up with anything. Being in Canada wasn't helping the timeline any either. From memory I think it's an 8" chuck with an 11mm tslot groove and 1.5mmx60* serrations and M8 bolts. I'll check on tomorrow when I'm back. It think it was the 11mm slot with m8 bolts that was the hard to find part. Lathe is a Nakamura Tome tw-20.

                            Side note while we're on the subject.... How much jaw movement is acceptable? When you clamp/unclamp these jaws they rock back and forth what seems to me an very large amount (~0.05"+). I'll try and get a video tomorrow. I would have thought the moving jaws would be tighter and more restrained than that. But so far the 2 jobs I've used the chuck for over the last couple years have turned out ok lol. Most of what I use it for is bar work on the left spindle every couple of months. It doesn't get used much, and nobody else in the shop is interested in learning how to use it, so it's kind of my baby.

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                            • What did you machine today?

                              This is a replacement shifter linkage for a Honda dirt track car. The rubber one busted


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                              • Began a gang tool holder that will fit in a QCTP tool block. I would not do this if the parts were steel or aluminum but they are POM (Delrin is a brand name).

                                Estimated time for 500 parts is 316 hours using a 1998 CNC lathe without a tool changer simply a QCTP, this will require 2500 manual tool changes just for the first operation. The part looks roughly like so without the bearing bores shown which are part of the first operation.


                                Each end has a bore on the drawing of .500" +0.000 -0.002 X .563" +-0.005" deep on each end, there is a 3/8" through hole for the shaft that passes through the bearings pressed into each end when assembled.

                                Each of the 3 OD (for lack of a better term) features have a radius of .114" and as an added bonus are different diameters of 1.344" +0.002-0.000. 1.321" +0.000-.002 and 1.280" +0.002-0.000. There is a radius of .0.200" at the bottom of each feature which are the same diameter of 1.105".

                                Milled an aluminum block to fit the tool post holders.


                                Put it in the tool post and drilled and reamed holes for the tools to be held by set screws from the chuck, gave each hole a tool number. The hole for the 1/4" boring bar has not been drilled yet it needs a holder to fit in the holder (-:


                                80 roughed parts, this took 2 days already including setup.


                                I do not like doing repetitive work such as this job, normally I would set up and program a part that does not require any manual tool changes on these machines, then a 20 something year old part changer can run thousands of them with little problem. 5 manual tool changes per part would be chaos for a part changer, my goal is to have zero tool changes so that someone else can run the parts.
                                I may be dreaming with this machine however.

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