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  • Very pretty!
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
      How small an arbor press can you broach with? Are those 1-2 ton presses worth having? They do seem kinda too small to get the broach to fit
      it's not the tonnage alone, the "daylight" under the ram is the main thing, you cannot broach what you cannot get under the press. I have a 1 ton, and I cannot get most of the broaches under it. There are presses that have more daylight without necessarily having more depth, and that type would be good.

      The leverage is also not great with some of the one ton units, either. Maybe just barely OK for the smallest broaches, but definitely lacking. Does not make broaching a routine easy part of the day.

      I know hydraulic presses give little if any feedback, potentially risking broken broaches, but I am still tempted, since I have a frame and "Portapower" type system. Frame has lots more daylight, and the pumping should be less stressful on everything (other than the broach) than hanging on the handle of the one ton press..
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        I know hydraulic presses give little if any feedback, potentially risking broken broaches, but I am still tempted, since I have a frame and "Portapower" type system. Frame has lots more daylight, and the pumping should be less stressful on everything (other than the broach) than hanging on the handle of the one ton press..
        Works fine. You might make some bits to help with maintaining alignments so your life is made easier. Have at it.

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        • Flat parts held in 12" full radius soft jaws bolted to an 8" chuck, .060" deep pocket turned into the jaws. Stock was plasma cut A36 steel, this is an excellent way to hold thin parts that have a length to diameter ratio above 1:25.
          This is only the first side of 20 parts.



          This is not my idea of fun.
          Last edited by Bented; 12-24-2019, 04:18 PM.

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          • Finished my barrel vise today. I'll bore and split the wood block, wrap the barrel with friction tape and hope for the best. Shotgun barrels shouldn't be as tight as rifles, no?
            I cut it off twice; it's still too short
            Oregon, USA

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            • Modified some T nuts to fit my Taig mill, and ran a CNC program that resulted in chip welding and snapping a carbide endmill. However, before it snapped, it produced a beautiful fountain of aluminum chips doing an adaptive clearing.

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              • I made a start on building Ian Hunt's tube bender. I made a tube bender years ago I thought was pretty slick...but this is better. Mine had a stationary tube where as this lets the tube move and pulls it around the former...and has an inside bullet mandrel. Based on photo it gets a much tighter radius while maintaining the right profile. Aesthetics on tight bends are important - mostly its for model work

                Cut is 1/2" wide, 1.75" deep, single pass





                .

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                • Ah, the advantages of having a BIG horizontal mill.

                  But watch out about showing the C-clamps. We have a few folks here that will jump all over that as poor practice, or worse. Personally, it seems practical, and the way you have it there is the best way to do it, the angle plate takes all the force.. Looks like you have bolted clamps as well as the C- clamps.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • There's a bolt through the angle plate to the T slot and 2 strap clamps. Better would be more bolts to the table but I didn't want to take the time to drill the angle plate to suit the tables T slot spacing. There's a lot of lift on the work when the cut starts, just held by two C clamps. I eased in a bit before engaging the feed. That was my main concern, I could make a more solid set up and it would be worth it if you had 100 to do. But for one, a quick setup and easing into the cut seemed the way to go. end of the day, I win any debate on it because it worked
                    .

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                    • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                      There's a bolt through the angle plate to the T slot and 2 strap clamps. Better would be more bolts to the table but I didn't want to take the time to drill the angle plate to suit the tables T slot spacing. There's a lot of lift on the work when the cut starts, just held by two C clamps. I eased in a bit before engaging the feed. That was my main concern, I could make a more solid set up and it would be worth it if you had 100 to do. But for one, a quick setup and easing into the cut seemed the way to go. end of the day, I win any debate on it because it worked
                      Looking forward to see more of this.

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                      • My buddy does woodworking and uses 5 or 6 routers at a time. Each is set for a specific task so repetitive work goes quickly. His most favored router broke when he tried to adjust it without loosening the pinch bolt that locked the base from moving. You can see it in this drawing. The pinch mechanism is simply two tabs connected by a bolt that doubles as the pinion that drives the rack to adjust the base. The tab broke off cleanly at the point where it attached to the base, right where you'd expect it to crack.

                        My fix was simply to make sure that it was not magnesium, and then TIG weld it with 4043, which was the only aluminum filler I had in hand. I built up the area to about twice the original thickness since 4043 is not very ductile and I did not want the pinch mechanism to bend where I mended it. It might last, it might not. As my buddy said, it was broken before he gave it to me so any extra use is a win.
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                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                        Location: SF East Bay.

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                        • made a 3/4" shank to get drill chuck into my mill

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                          • 8 1/4 diameter steel tube 60" long. It finishes at 7.934" before .003" per side of hard chrome. This is not a fun part by any possible definition of "fun".

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                            • different end of the scale to the above, but arguably of far greater importance - I needed to fix my coffee grinder before tomorrow morning so my daily coffee schedule remains uninterrupted.

                              Center plastic bit of the cutter broke, so I made a replacement out of a 5/16-24 bolt, a washer and a nut. Recut the coarse threads on the motor shaft with a 6-32 die (didn't look too bad) to match the 6-32 hole I tapped in the bolt. Assembled everything with a splodge of 5min epoxy and a dash of loctite. Seems to work, though the proof in the pudding will be at 10.30am tomorrow..
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                              • mattthemuppet Disaster averted hopefully. Otherwise you'd have had to buy some "universal grind" beans from the supermarket - you know, the kind that manages to be wrong for all machines/methods simultaneously and is made out of beans that probably would have made quite nice coffee about six months ago!

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