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  • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    I needed to fix my coffee grinder before tomorrow morning so my daily coffee schedule remains uninterrupted.
    Good save, but if you like coffee, then get yourself a burr grinder. The cheapest burr grinder (even a manual one) is more consistent than a blade grinder. You can improve the results from a blade grinder by sifting out the boulders, then rubbing the remaining grounds into a paper towel to pick up the fines. If you taste an improvement, then a burr grinder should be in your future.

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    • I have a cheap coffee grinder like that, but I use it for mixing spices instead.

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      • Made a couple of pins with a threaded end. One 8mm diameter and the other 4.3mm. Mic'd them the next day (cool down) and I've got 8.005mm and 4.295mm. I'll take that
        Was hogging off 6's and 9's for a change too.

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        • I know you lot like feedback about completed projects, so I'm happy to say the grinder rescue was a complete success
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          thanks Cenedd, I was panicking a bit last night. Yesterdays afternoon coffee was a mix of half ground beans and some manky old ground coffee.

          Pinstripe, I'm sure you're right, I just haven't found much of a difference in my experience (I have a manual grinder that we got as a wedding present 17 years ago). Good beans, ideally freshly roasted is what floats my boat

          Once I've finished this cup I need to tear down the washing machine to figure out why the fabric softener isn't dispensing. Fun.

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          • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post

            Pinstripe, I'm sure you're right, I just haven't found much of a difference in my experience (I have a manual grinder that we got as a wedding present 17 years ago). Good beans, ideally freshly roasted is what floats my boat

            Once I've finished this cup I need to tear down the washing machine to figure out why the fabric softener isn't dispensing. Fun.
            Coffee-making machinery is like metal-working machinery: no matter what your budget is, you can spend it and more and still be made to feel like you've not spent enough. As long as you're enjoying the coffee, it's all good.
            Like machining, it's when you're pushing the envelope that you need the better stuff. Me, I like my triple ristretto with cold milk in the morning before I function Try ordering one out and see the looks of confusion and/or disgust that you get!

            I have a friend who is (nearly) as anal about coffee as I am and yet I don't rate the coffee he makes and raves about. I suspect he probably thinks the same of mine, but perhaps is too polite to say. The only thing I would say regarding coffee machinery is either make it cheap and easily replaceable or invest in something that's repairable - especially since you hang out here! Both have their place - just avoid expensive and not repairable....what you might call the Apple of the coffee world!

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            • you have to grind the beans ???

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              • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                Coffee-making machinery is like metal-working machinery:
                Then we should be able to come with the ultimate home shop coffee grinder. I agree conical burr is far better than blade, but they are expensive. Had one that broke after a couple of years (double , hate paying a lot and not getting quality). Currently have to get it ground at the store, (also double ) Those conical burrs would be a tricky thing to make, is there a better or comparable way to grind with an easier to manufacture business end?
                .

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                • I just buy the cheapest coffee nowadays. I used to be into stuff like that... when I lived in the city in an apartment. Obsessing over high end coffee, beer and all that stuff.... I think it's the mental stress of the urban lifestyle and it was a kind of coping mechanism.

                  Now that I live in the countryside I drink the cheap pre-ground coffee and cheap beer and it's just as good to me I've become the anti-hipster.

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                  • C'mon, we're machinists...... Conical shaped grinding burr, held in a collet on the bridgeport. Plunging down into a steel block with a suitable recess to hold the beans. Set the depth stop on the quill a bit higher than bottom, lest you like some roughage with your brew (who hasn't drank a chip or two anyway?).

                    Can't remember the brand of our burr grinder, but it's been going strong for about 10 years now. Cuisinart maybe? Got a hand one two my FIL made for us from a lee valley kit. Works great for those mornings the power is out, and coffee needs to be made the cowboy way on the woodstove.

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                    • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                      Then we should be able to come with the ultimate home shop coffee grinder. I agree conical burr is far better than blade, but they are expensive. Had one that broke after a couple of years (double , hate paying a lot and not getting quality). Currently have to get it ground at the store, (also double ) Those conical burrs would be a tricky thing to make, is there a better or comparable way to grind with an easier to manufacture business end?
                      At the risk of muddying the waters, the argument currently goes that flat burrs are better - and conveniently, they seem to be cheaper. The challenges are likely to be the same as machining: rigidity to keep the burrs uniformly spaced but adjustable in very small but repeatable amounts. Add in the fact that nobody wants a coffee grinder the size and weight of a bridgeport in their kitchen or to need hearing protection to make coffee and the challenges do add up. Also, it's the higher-end improvements that cost the money. You'll get 80% of the quality for 20% of the price (or whatever similar number but you get the point) but if you want that 95%+ it's going to cost you unreasonable money.

                      Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                      Obsessing over high end coffee, beer and all that stuff.... I think it's the mental stress of the urban lifestyle and it was a kind of coping mechanism.
                      Now that I live in the countryside I drink the cheap pre-ground coffee and cheap beer and it's just as good to me I've become the anti-hipster.
                      You sir, are an inspiration! I'm not sure I'd go the whole hog and go for the cheapest of either but there's definitely mileage in 'good enough' is good enough. I've had some really nice beers that were something like $10 each....but it's just not sustainable for something that, let's be honest, is an addictive product.

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                      • We've got the Cuisinart Supreme Coffee Mill, which is an inexpensive flat burr grinder with great reviews. Going on strong after 4+ years of use, not a single issue. It's on the noisy side even for a burr grinder, but it's solidly built and produces a good consistent grind. Big step up from the Folgers everyone is drinking (or Timmies... if you call that crap coffee).

                        Life is to short for bad brews of either coffee or beer. The thing is, I'm usually satisfied after one or two good beers, with cheap beer you just keep drinking. Try doing that with an Imperial Stout....

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                        • Originally posted by Tom S View Post
                          Wif you call that crap coffee).
                          I do not.

                          On your and Cenedd's recommendation I think I'll try the Cuisinart flat burr mill. Very reasonably priced. irrc the BS one that broke was many hundreds.
                          .

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                          • "life is too short for bad coffee" is a T-shirt I'd love to have I'm not a coffee snob by any means (see piloried blade grinder above), but I didn't drink coffee until I was 19 simply because my parents drank the most disgusting crap coffee imaginable. I then went to live in Colombia, which has pretty decent coffee. The rest they say, is history..

                            I'll see what the wife thinks about having a BP in the kitchen. She should be cool with that, right?

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                            • Coffee snobs... Glad I am not one, simply so I can enjoy the coffee on the airplane. Some guys have it so bad that they can't drink any while at work. Not a good thing on a 24+ hour duty day.

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                              • I drink coffee that tastes good to me. I like a rich dark roast with nothing added to it. I thought Starbucks was pretty good, but got tired of their politics and won't buy from them again. I found a brand called Seattle's Best, and was grinding beans, but now I buy the preground coffee. I brew it in a Bunn drip brewer and pretty strong, but there is NOTHING as good and relaxing that that good first cup.

                                By the way, coffee changes after about a half hour after brewed. If you need more after that, dump it and brew a fresh pot.

                                Like everything else here, this is just an opinion. I really hope that all are enjoying whatever they brew, that is the true bottom line.
                                S E Michigan

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