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  • I think I started drinking coffee as a teen in college in the late '60s, and I was satisfied with instant coffee, especially more or less premium kinds such as Folger's Crystals or Medaglia d'Oro.


    When I got into hiking and backpacking in the mid-70s I found that it did not add too much extra weight to carry a small aluminum percolator and use it on an alcohol or gas stove to brew some great-smelling and tasty coffee, much better than instant. There was one weird guy who carried a container of instant, which he shoveled dry into his mouth and washed it down with water!

    Later I discovered the advantages of drip coffee with a paper filter, and also the improvement when using fine ground coffee. I also had a plastic funnel which weighed almost nothing that I sometimes used on backpacks, but the percolator still seemed nice because of the sound and aroma. I don't know when I got my first bean grinder, but that soon became part of my morning ritual. I found a good variety of whole bean coffees at Trader Joe's for reasonable prices, and that became my standard for a long time.

    Maybe 15-20 years ago I got a free coffee maker from Gevalia along with a subscription to their shipped coffees, and I found them pretty good, but not really worth the extra cost. After awhile it stopped working, and I got a Hamilton-Beach Flex-Brew as a Christmas gift. It has lasted about four years, but started having problems where it would fail to supply hot water into the grounds, sometimes only half of what was in the reservoir, and needed to be restarted. Now it usually works but the blue operating LED faded and stopped working. It's a single serve machine that is great for me as a single person, but sometimes I like the idea of having a carafe with several cups worth of the hot elixir ready for additional "fixes" of caffeine.

    I haven't used the grinder for quite some time. My go-to store, Food Lion, has regular promos for $2 off Seattle's Best, and they have their own fine ground premium coffee in small bags, which I find very good. I keep it sealed tightly in the fridge to preserve flavor. My sister an BIL just gave me a Specialty Coffee Ninja machine that can brew individual cups or a carafe, and also can make foamed ice coffee and Cappuccino and other varieties. But I haven't tried it yet.


    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
    USA Maryland 21030

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    • I cut back on drinking coffee when I retired in 2009 and only just this past week drank the first cup of coffee I've had in several years. I don't miss it.

      However, I was wondering if any of you make "egg coffee"?
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • There is good money to be made in high-end coffee accessories. This is the grinder du jour, a Monolith Flat Max. $3,250 USD, and new batches sell out in minutes.

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        Here's my latest creation. Not off-topic because I used a machine to make it

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        • Originally posted by pinstripe View Post
          There is good money to be made in high-end coffee accessories. This is the grinder du jour, a Monolith Flat Max. $3,250 USD, and new batches sell out in minutes.

          Click image for larger version

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          Here's my latest creation. Not off-topic because I used a machine to make it

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          For that price it should tuck you into bed!

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          • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post

            For that price it should tuck you into bed!
            The old saying "A fool and his money are soon parted" comes to mind.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • Finished making something that I'm feeling pleasantly smug about today. Can you tell what it is yet?



              How 'bout now?




              This should give it away:



              The plastic adapter with a taper on each end snapped. This is the second one now so I suspect it's not liking cutting oils or something. This is my overkill solution that also improves on the jubilee clip with an 8mm pin loctited into it. That didn't work well because the clamp just span round the pin. This has an 8mm pin to clamp onto and a 4.3mm that sits nicely in the clamp's relief and stops it spinning. Should hopefully keep things a little cleaner when flycutting and help with evacuating chips when slotting.
              The end is tapered so it'll take tools like a brush or a crevice tool - for those odd occasions I actually get round to cleaning up!

              Comment


              • That's a neat project Cenedd. However the best way I've found of keeping the area around the mill tidy with minimal effort is a set of table covers and shields to go around the vise. When I was using a 50mm facemill to surface some alu stock the chips on the guards sounded like rain on a tin roof. Couple of minutes later all the chips (bar a few escapees) were in the alu recycling bag.

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                • mattthemuppet I think I still have work to do. I started listing out all the things I'm either working on or plan to do. Just added shields to that list. I need to sort out proper vise hold-down clamps before I can look at table covers - still ye-haw'ing it at the moment as you can see. I needed a new nozzle in order to be able to clean the floor/bench/table anyway and I still think it'll come in useful for chip evacuation and/or in combo with the shields when I get that far. Incidently, these were the pins that I was pleased about being only 0.005mm over and under target dimension - because obviously, that sort of tolerance is important for this application

                  Comment


                  • well, good job on hitting dimension, especially on a part that small. I made my chip trays from cheap oven trays from the $ store (Poundland equivalent) and the shields from whatever suitable sized scrap sheet I had to hand and some hard drive magnets. Handy plus is that the shields keep the chip trays in place

                    Finally finished my mill vise speed handle. Way more complicated than it needs to be but it looks pretty and I'll use it alot! Made from various bits of scrap (including some lab stand bracket for the main body) and two 12mm sockets turned down a la Tundra Twin Track. Works very nicely and doesn't foul the Y axis handle which was a design goal. The aim was to have it somewhat balanced which didn't happen, but it's not too far off.

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                    anodised it because I could and I need the practice. Still more to learn!

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                    • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                      well, good job on hitting dimension, especially on a part that small. I made my chip trays from cheap oven trays from the $ store (Poundland equivalent) and the shields from whatever suitable sized scrap sheet I had to hand and some hard drive magnets. Handy plus is that the shields keep the chip trays in place
                      Cheers. Would be interesting to see a picture of your shield and tray setup. A picture tells a thousand words and all that.
                      I was thinking polycarbonate or lexan or something clear.

                      Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                      anodised it because I could and I need the practice. Still more to learn!
                      I was going to say that your cold bluing looked good but that explains it!

                      Comment


                      • busy busy busy

                        ran conduit and wire (220v) to my bport CNC, mounted a VFD in the cabinet. A few ticks closer to completion on this long drawn out project

                        More work on the tube bender - spindle shaft below. Its fairly large, bearing diameter is 1.75, top head is 2" thick x 3.125" diameter. Going with what I had about I decided to do a weldment. Braces and a belt as I did a shrink fit and then will weld the ends then final turn. As the profile is so thin on the cut side I didn't want to rely on a the shrink fit alone

                        ...and i finally managed to get the 10ee's gearbox back together. I can strip service and reassembly a watch but this just about did me in. Far more difficult. It took several tedious attempts before I managed to get all the parts in that hole and working properly, there are sequencing and placement aspects that make it a real 3d jigsaw puzzle. Every bearing replaced on it (there's a lot) as well as a damage gear.

                        oh yeah, made bourbon butterscotch pudding for desert today with salted cayenne maple sponge toffee pieces on top......wife's doing roast beast with Yorksire's .....but I didn't dare resurrect the "what did you cook" thead

                        shaft for bender







                        frame for bender



                        Lathe - a lot of parts to go in that hole



                        Eureka!







                        Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-12-2020, 04:36 PM.
                        .

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                          ...and i finally managed to get the 10ee's gearbox back together. I can strip service and reassembly a watch but this just about did me in. Far more difficult. It took several tedious attempts before I managed to get all the parts in that hole and working properly, there are sequencing and placement aspects that make it a real 3d jigsaw puzzle. Every bearing replaced on it (there's a lot) as well as a damage gear.
                          It will never cease to amaze me that a talented fellow (or group of talented fellows) sat down at some point and designed and drew all those components and assembly by hand. No computers, slide rules and pencils. The RR Merlin engines are another one that will always make me pause in admiration for the same reason.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                            well, good job on hitting dimension, especially on a part that small. I made my chip trays from cheap oven trays from the $ store (Poundland equivalent) and the shields from whatever suitable sized scrap sheet I had to hand and some hard drive magnets. Handy plus is that the shields keep the chip trays in place

                            Finally finished my mill vise speed handle. Way more complicated than it needs to be but it looks pretty and I'll use it alot! Made from various bits of scrap (including some lab stand bracket for the main body) and two 12mm sockets turned down a la Tundra Twin Track. Works very nicely and doesn't foul the Y axis handle which was a design goal. The aim was to have it somewhat balanced which didn't happen, but it's not too far off.

                            Click image for larger version

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                            anodised it because I could and I need the practice. Still more to learn!
                            Looks Great Matt,the anodized looks sharp.I've collected a bunch of Sockets over the years found a bunch of 8 point and sqaure ones that I never seen before at Dump.

                            Comment


                            • My friend made a drilling jig from wood to make it easier to assemble some furniture that he was making. On the very first hole the furniture was harder than the jig and it opened up the drill guide holes to the point of being useless. He showed on my doorstep with a chunk of 1x1.4x5 aluminum of unknown alloy. He had cut it on his table saw, and was wondering if I could true up the sides for him.

                              Half an hour later he left with 4 holes placed with .005 tolerance and 6 parallel sides.

                              Dan

                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                                busy busy busy

                                ran conduit and wire (220v) to my bport CNC, mounted a VFD in the cabinet. A few ticks closer to completion on this long drawn out project

                                More work on the tube bender - spindle shaft below. Its fairly large, bearing diameter is 1.75, top head is 2" thick x 3.125" diameter. Going with what I had about I decided to do a weldment. Braces and a belt as I did a shrink fit and then will weld the ends then final turn. As the profile is so thin on the cut side I didn't want to rely on a the shrink fit alone

                                ...and i finally managed to get the 10ee's gearbox back together. I can strip service and reassembly a watch but this just about did me in. Far more difficult. It took several tedious attempts before I managed to get all the parts in that hole and working properly, there are sequencing and placement aspects that make it a real 3d jigsaw puzzle. Every bearing replaced on it (there's a lot) as well as a damage gear.

                                oh yeah, made bourbon butterscotch pudding for desert today with salted cayenne maple sponge toffee pieces on top......wife's doing roast beast with Yorksire's .....but I didn't dare resurrect the "what did you cook" thead

                                shaft for bender







                                frame for bender



                                Lathe - a lot of parts to go in that hole



                                Eureka!






                                Is that a Rapidue Tool Post on your Lathe?

                                Bender Frame looking good,all those gears look like Jig Saw Puzzle.How many Lathes do you have?

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