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  • I am in the midst of rebuilding the works fo a street clock. After many (close to 100) years all the shaft bearings are some oddball diameter. The solution has been to make what Guy Lautard calls a toolmakers reamer. (Page 53 of The Machinist's Bedside Reader, Book 1)
    I am using drill rod, turning to desired diameter and milling the 20 degree angle. A little love with a diamond hone ant they are ready to go. No real reason to heat treat as they only have to do 1 or 2 bores in Brass.

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    • Pictures of two bushings before the mount holes are drilled and the reamer. Also a picture of the front of the clock to show where the bushings are located.

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      • Finish lathe operation on bronze split bearings, I rough them leaving .075" on the ID and OD then the slot is milled. They then sit for several days afterwards in order to settle in and stop moving about. Bolt them to this fixture and finish bore and turn, it is a laborious process as you can imagine, the last OP is a lubricant groove in the ID that stops just short of each side of the slot and is done in a mill using a different fixture.
        Last edited by Bented; 04-01-2020, 05:22 PM.

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        • Probably qualifies under the heading of "stupid stuff not worth mentioning", as commented on elsewhere a few days ago..... But it's all good, and even the stupid stuff is something that requires a shop to do.

          Spent some time checking out and calibrating my herd of "Amprobe" AC clamp-on ammeters. (It's always nice to have a high current source available). In the process, I had to take the backs off a couple to re-adjust the trim controls.

          I noticed that one of them was missing the two screws that hold the back on. It was only held by the snap-feature of the back. The screws are plastic screws, 8-32 ends and 0.187 shank. I had some PVC rod of about the right size, so I decided to replace those while I was at it.

          The PVC is extremely flexible, so getting everything sufficiently concentric was a chore, and even then it was not perfect when I was done. But the screws, however ugly they are, worked.

          The originals for some of the meters were slotted, for others they are hex, apparently as a means to discourage opening the meter up, since the hex is down inside a close-fitting round recess. I opted for the slotted type.

          Pics of some of the "herd" and the new and OEM screws. The black original screws are hex type, on the cover of the disassembled meter at the right.







          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • Made a shifter rod for a friend's pickup truck restomod. The shifter that came with the Mustang GT engine/ transmission was down by his ankles, so I made this out of 5/8" stainless for the rod and alu for the backing bracket. The shifter knob will be a later project.
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            • .195" Diameter holes drilled 8.250" deep in 303 SS, 6 parts total.

              750 RPM's, .003 IPR feed and .025 pecks

              The utter beauty of the Peck Drill Cycle, this is an old machine (1996) and has painfully slow rapids but anything is better than cranking handles for hours.
              Start it and go and do something useful until it is finished.

              Last edited by Bented; 04-09-2020, 05:55 PM.

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              • Originally posted by Bented View Post
                .195" Diameter holes drilled 8.250" deep in 303 SS, 6 parts total.

                750 RPM's, .003 IPR feed and .025 pecks
                42D eh? I think that officially counts as "deep"!

                Originally posted by Bented View Post
                The utter beauty of the Peck Drill Cycle, this is an old machine (1996) and has painfully slow rapids but anything is better than cranking handles for hours.
                Agreed.What's the G code for install some servos and grow a controller?!

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                • A custom 90 degree elbow for the FP2 mill. The drain hole in the vertical table for draining cutting fluid is in a very tight spot, the elbow coupling I bought did not fit so I made my own with an integral hose barb, that allowe me to get size down. I had brass to make this from, but brass is expensive and I was afraid of screwing up.






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                  • Was asked to have a look at salvaging a worn out thread on a nice three-in-one pen ... ended up with more fun than anticipated and he with a nicer pen than handed over. 304 stainless mostly. Ouch.

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                    Last edited by Boats69; 04-19-2020, 03:29 PM.

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                    • My $5 garage sale Millers Falls bench grinder had really clunky adjustments for the tool rest: multiple bolts in awkward locations. Adjust the up & down, then the angle, back to up & down, PITA. My KISS solution - easy to use, easy to make, sturdy:

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                      • I need to copy that for my grinder.
                        “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                        Lewis Grizzard

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                        • I made these motorcycle axle locators from a piece of 2” all-thread that came off a big heat exchanger. I got it back when we were locally owned and had bosses you could hit up for a couple pieces of scrap metal.
                          Not sure of the alloy but it work hardens pretty easily, has a very fine slightly orange spark and eats up Chinese drill bits if you’re not paying attention.

                          I then did an O/A torch heat treat with “Cherry Red” case hardening compound. Quenched in oil and then put in water to dissolve the residue. Next I put a wire wheel on the bench grinder to clean up and leave the surface a dull grey. After that was tempering on a digital hot plate at 475f for 2 hours, cool and repeat. I wasn’t looking for color case but it seems like I got a a pretty good fake.



                          Now I have to decide whether to leave them this way or do a black oxide as planned.
                          Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                          9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                          • Tim, if your studs came out of a heat exchanger in a refinery they are either B-7 or B- 16. B-16 if if it was a high temp exchanger . B-7 is similar to 4104 or 4143 pre hard. B-16 is similar with a little vanadium to withstand the heat. John b.
                            John b. SW Chicago burbs.

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                            • Turned, drilled and tapped a new motor lock nut to replace the damaged one on my Bridgeport. Still need to drill and tap for the lever. Started work on the lever to replace the missing one. I used the lever from the other side to set the taper angle. A round file cleaned up the radius.
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                              Last edited by flathead4; 04-19-2020, 07:28 AM.
                              Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                              • Thanks John b ! It’s from a Feed/Effluent Exchanger in a Hydro Treater so 430/720 f . I’m guessing B-16.

                                I used your info to find the Vulcan Steel Products site where I found the alloy make up. 👍
                                Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                                9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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