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  • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    I've seen a lot of threads 20 thou under, but 1.5 is pretty fine. So I won't disagree with your judgement call there. But I think you mean major diameter instead of minor diameter. FWIW, I'd go ahead and thread it in the future even with the chuck marks. Most should go away, and what's left should file off trivially. A few low spots is no big deal. What chuck were you using that left such indentations?
    Yep you're right, I should have said major dia. I'm probably being too fussy on this job, but I want to make sure it isn't me

    I thought about going with it, but the idea of losing half a MM didn't sit well with me after looking up the thread spec. Especially knowing that I could do better.

    Using the Pratt-Burnerd 3-jaw that came with it -- I normally give it a good solid torque on all 3 key holes. It has a pretty fine gear ratio, takes about a million turns and gives you carpal tunnel syndrome. The jaws are a bit dull where they grip the work, so I tend to reap down on it.
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 08-27-2020, 02:40 AM.

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    • My Sheldon/Vernon horizontal mill had this makeshift drawbar:



      It was especially limited when trying to tighten a collet on an endmill. Also there wasn't much room to swing a hammer to loosen it. And I don't like whanging on bearings with hammers. So I made a captive nut for the drawbar. Being captive it both tightens and loosens the arbor or collet or tool holder.

      The inner & outer pieces of the nut sandwich the end of a cap that goes over the end of the spindle.

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      Assembled by silver soldering the nut together:

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      The hole in the cap was intended for a split pin, but the spindle was too hard to drill. So the cap is soft (!) soldered on. The knob on the end is for threading the draw bar into/out of the arbor.

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      • Some kind of fittings, .62" thru, 1 3/8-12 thread, after the lathe work they go to a mill for wrench flats, material is HRS.
        80 parts

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        • 1-3/8 x 12TPI fairly screams "hydraulic gland nut" to me. 12 TPI does weird things lie that, especially under a full moon....

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          • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
            1-3/8 x 12TPI fairly screams "hydraulic gland nut" to me. 12 TPI does weird things lie that, especially under a full moon....
            They gave us an undamaged sample several years ago, the sample OD was actually 1.360", I made the ring gauge pictured to fit the sample and have been making several hundred per year without problem since then.
            This company manufactures gas powered infrared process heaters, I suspect that they are an interface between the normally crude commercial plumbing and their machinery.
            Last edited by Bented; 09-03-2020, 06:45 PM.

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            • What I started with this morning

              Where I'm at right now. I Just hit go on the overnight cavity ball program, and one to cut the locks. Should have a nice finished mold half waiting for me on Tuesday morning. Will have to fit test the side I just cut to this, but hopefully I won't have to do much tweaking. This is the 3rd set I've fit, so I'm pretty sure of my clearances this time, but that split parting line (and IMO over constrained locks) might throw a loop into things. Only 2 more cavity sides to finish, then I'm done with these molds and back to fixture work. I'm going golfing tomorrow and it's along weekend.

              I've shoveled a lot of chips the past few weeks


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              • Turned down the end of the wiper motor shaft to 10mm (from 12mm knurled and tapered) so I can re purpose it for a yarn winder for the wife. Had to make a bushing/collet to hold it as the gear is molded on. Took longer to make the bushing than to machine the shaft, but it's done. Now to make a pulley, then cut off the original housing and tig on some new mounts and get this project finished as it's been kicking around for almost a year....
                .
                Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 09-09-2020, 08:15 PM.

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                • Set up a lathe for a young guy to polish 1/2" od X 1/8" wall steel tubes 48" long.

                  This is a tail stock, this is a live center, insert the center like so. Chuck a couple of inches of one end and run the center into the end of the tube, clamp the TS using this lever and turn this hand wheel snug. Turn spindle on and polish, flip the part 180 Deg. and polish the end that was in the chuck.

                  Do not turn the chuck on without the center snugly in the end.of the tube, then showed him this video .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8ZJa2HSkYE
                  He was very careful after that (-:

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                  • Today for a friend I shortened a7/16" wheel stud to 1 1/8" length and I made him a shoulder bolt from a 7/16" bolt. The shoulder is 1/2" long and then 5/8" of it is threaded 3/8-16.
                    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                    • Made a set of bearing extraction and insertion tools so I could replace the 8 bearings in my mountain bike's rear suspension.

                      I'm not sure why it took me 7 years to do, but I'm going to service them alot more frequently from now on... Man were they beat.

                      So much nicer now!


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                      • Click image for larger version

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ID:	1901155 Cut a keyway in a crankshaft. 1/16” x 1/4”
                        solid carbide endmill @4400 rpm. Click image for larger version

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                        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                        Oregon, USA

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                        • CAM is pissing me off trying to get the tool paths to do what I want, but I'm getting there! Click image for larger version

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                          • Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                            CAM is pissing me off trying to get the tool paths to do what I want, but I'm getting there! Click image for larger version

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                            Not criticism merely a question.
                            Why did you not use minimum thickness material, finish the flat center section then hold them there in a fixture or vice and finish the ends, you would not then have to face mill a good deal of material off the back?

                            Also, the feeds are to high for the spindle speed and you may be milling in the conventional direction. Lots of flood coolant will vastly improve the finish

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                            • Today's part was just a rather small part made on the Logan. A small spacer, 0.375 OD, and 0.218 ID, by 0.185 thick.

                              Used to fill the hole to adapt a modern control potentiometer (made by Alpha) to the hole in the panel for the old control on a P.A. amplifier I repaired for a friend.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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                              • Originally posted by C_M_H View Post
                                Made a set of bearing extraction and insertion tools so I could replace the 8 bearings in my mountain bike's rear suspension.

                                I'm not sure why it took me 7 years to do, but I'm going to service them alot more frequently from now on... Man were they beat.

                                So much nicer now!
                                yeah, that's where it's at Machine tools make bike maintenance so much easier and cheaper. I've made similar tools for my hubs and bottom bracket amongst other things. What bike?

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